Author Topic: Young tree pruning  (Read 567 times)

Olivier

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Young tree pruning
« on: March 17, 2022, 10:34:29 AM »
I have this very young Meiwa Kumquat tree and I'd like to have some input from you citrus enthusiast veterans.

I read in another thread that it is rather pointless to shape young trees, however I also read that it should be avoided to have a Y embranchment on a tree. So I'm not sure what's the best course of action here.

My tree seems to be currently set to grow with that Y shape at the base, where one branch is growing vigorously and the other one is less vigorous and quite elongated. Should I cut the long branch so the tree can focus its growth on the vertical branch or just let it do its own thing?

See picture attached.



Millet

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Re: Young tree pruning
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2022, 11:57:29 AM »
I would leave the tree alone,.  However if you do wish to prune I would cut about 1/2 way up the branch immediately above where the new growth on the branch has started.  Where the two lines of the X cross in your picture.

poncirsguy

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Re: Young tree pruning
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2022, 02:42:11 PM »
Meiwa kumquats should not be trimmed.  They often have a hard time or die after limb removal.  Her is a link to how Meiwa kumquat tree grows.

https://www.houzz.com/discussions/6244256/seedling-meiwa-kumquat#n=2

Olivier

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Re: Young tree pruning
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2022, 09:44:35 AM »
Thank you for your input.

I'll just leave it as is for now and let it grow as it pleases.

Walt

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Re: Young tree pruning
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2022, 12:04:23 PM »
you might tie the left  branch down.  That would reduce the apical dominance now shared by both branches, and make the one higher dominant, and encourage the lower on to branch.
I haven't done this with citrus but it works with most tree genera used as bonsai. 

 

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