Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 107974 times)

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #600 on: July 29, 2021, 04:36:42 PM »
here my winters 20222 tree that made its first crop this year.  this is the variety that a lot of CA nurseries are popogating because it grows well here.  The mangos turn purple when ripe and look really nice.  I havent tried it yet but its supposed to be decent. 


This one is a super julie seedling from 2018, it hasnt fruited yet and grows really fast and upright.  I started more of these seeds this year.

« Last Edit: July 29, 2021, 04:51:46 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

mangoba

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #601 on: July 29, 2021, 04:57:11 PM »
They look amazing! Brad, do you give them any special treatment as far as fertilizers?

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #602 on: July 29, 2021, 05:42:29 PM »
not really, mangos dont like a lot of fertilizer.  maybe thry need more potassium once they start producing but I have been using avocado fertilizer on the winters and hot chicken poop on the super julie, just small amounts a couple times a year.  and tree trimmer mulch. 
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #603 on: July 29, 2021, 08:37:31 PM »
Wow, those look great!

John B

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #604 on: July 31, 2021, 02:04:53 AM »
here my winters 20222 tree that made its first crop this year.  this is the variety that a lot of CA nurseries are popogating because it grows well here.  The mangos turn purple when ripe and look really nice.  I havent tried it yet but its supposed to be decent. 


This one is a super julie seedling from 2018, it hasnt fruited yet and grows really fast and upright.  I started more of these seeds this year.


Great looking trees, Brad. Is the winters variety a seedling or was it grafted? I really like the growth of that tree.

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #605 on: July 31, 2021, 12:54:20 PM »
Yeah the winters tree is grafted.  They sell it as "20222" oe "winters" some places.  Bonita creek has it and he just says its purple mango or something.  Exotica had them in the past, thats where i got mine around 5 years ago. 
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #606 on: August 04, 2021, 03:26:31 AM »
Yeah the winters tree is grafted.  They sell it as "20222" oe "winters" some places.  Bonita creek has it and he just says its purple mango or something.  Exotica had them in the past, thats where i got mine around 5 years ago.

Thanks, Brad. Haven't been to Bonita Creek in some time. Please update us on a taste test even they are ripe.

mangoba

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #607 on: August 19, 2021, 08:29:58 AM »
When would you stop giving a young mango seedling nitrogen containing fertilizer? How cold does it have to get? Sandy soil very leaching here so I guess I can go as late as possible.

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #608 on: August 20, 2021, 08:48:13 AM »
I had a sweet tart mango that was accidentally picked at a non optimal time. I tried to ripen it. The mango started wrinkling so i decided to cut it open and try it. It was very tart with a sour belt candy quality. I thought the sugar level would be low possibly under 10 brix. To my surprise the sugar level was 25 brix. My guess is the fruit was just so start that it masked the sweetness. I wanted to plant the seed, however, there was no seed inside the husk.

Has anyone experienced a husk with no seed inside?

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #609 on: August 20, 2021, 12:06:01 PM »
Yes, many of my mangos have no seed. I usually call these nubbins. Nubbins are usually smaller than normal, can have a more rounded shape and most have a significantly higher number of lenticils. The nubbins are also usually much higher in Brix. My Lemon Zest and Sweet Tart nubbins are usually above 32% Brix.


I am guessing that the nubbins are caused by cold weather during pollination which may cause incomplete pollination. The pollination is enough to set the fruit but not enough to create the embryo. Fungus may also be a factor.

In many cases, the nubbins or the fruit without a seed are more likely to crack while sizing up.

Simon

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #610 on: August 20, 2021, 12:19:22 PM »
This year, my sweet-tart Mango Tree had over (40) fruit on the tree but one by one they cracked open on the tree with no seed. Looks like a total loss this year on my Sweet Tart.  Most of the fruit started to split heavily at about eight ounces in weight. Interestingly my Nam Doc Mai tree located nine feet away had no such issues. As Simon said likely a pollination issue or perhaps the tree is still too immature at this stage.

Enclosed are a few photos to illustrate.

Johnny

 

Sweet Tart Split 8-14-2021


Sweet Tart With No Seed 8-14-2021

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #611 on: August 20, 2021, 02:59:59 PM »
Thanks for the replies. Hopefully the one still on the tree gets to size up without cracking

mangoba

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #612 on: August 20, 2021, 03:33:03 PM »
Yes, many of my mangos have no seed. I usually call these nubbins. Nubbins are usually smaller than normal, can have a more rounded shape and most have a significantly higher number of lenticils. The nubbins are also usually much higher in Brix. My Lemon Zest and Sweet Tart nubbins are usually above 32% Brix.


I am guessing that the nubbins are caused by cold weather during pollination which may cause incomplete pollination. The pollination is enough to set the fruit but not enough to create the embryo. Fungus may also be a factor.

In many cases, the nubbins or the fruit without a seed are more likely to crack while sizing up.

Simon

In Egypt those sell for twice the price as consumers enjoy their sweetness.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #613 on: August 20, 2021, 05:25:13 PM »
This year, my sweet-tart Mango Tree had over (40) fruit on the tree but one by one they cracked open on the tree with no seed. Looks like a total loss this year on my Sweet Tart.  Most of the fruit started to split heavily at about eight ounces in weight. Interestingly my Nam Doc Mai tree located nine feet away had no such issues. As Simon said likely a pollination issue or perhaps the tree is still too immature at this stage.

Enclosed are a few photos to illustrate.

Johnny

 

Sweet Tart Split 8-14-2021


Sweet Tart With No Seed 8-14-2021

One thing members can experiment with is to remove the early blooms or the early fruit set. You just have to ensure there is enough time and cold weather so that there will be a second or third bloom. You can tell ahead of time if the fruit are nubbins or not because of the more rounded shape and increased lenticils.

Simon

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #614 on: August 20, 2021, 06:14:15 PM »
Thanks for the info, Simon. I will try to remove some from the first bloom set and see what the results are compared to the later blooms witch will certainly come with our relatively cold winter/spring.

I will also likely apply Phyton 35 (Copper Sulfate) to most of my mango trees during early and mid-bloom with two applications spaced three weeks apart to hopefully prevent Powdery Mildew (PM). I noticed my Sweet Tart tree had some mildew on the early growth and I suspect it likely had it during flowering as well. I had fruit split on this tree last year as well but there were only a few mangos that had formed in 2020. Just trying to theorize and come up with some potential solutions. Just another obstacle in growing mango trees in SoCal. Looks like I am going to lose 100% of my sweet-tart crop this year at my coastal location. In 2022 I am going to let all of my older more established mango trees fruit to capacity for the first time. I feel the mango trees I planted in the Ground in 2016/2017 are large enough to hold a decent crop. I am optimistic about Val-Carrie as It had a very heavy fruit set this year but I removed the small pea size fruit to focus on vegetative tree growth, I will not do that in 2022.   

As an Interesting side the 2019 Sweet Tart graft I did to a Manila Mango tree in the ground, in Alhambra at my Brother in Laws house, is holding half a dozen fruit when I was over there in late July. I did not see any fruit split issues on that tree. This location is much further inland with considerably more heat and thus far it appears to have performed better. I will be going over there in September to get the fruit. At least I will have some sweet-tart to eat.

Johnny 
« Last Edit: August 20, 2021, 06:30:03 PM by Johnny Eat Fruit »

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #615 on: August 20, 2021, 09:49:23 PM »
Sweet tart seems to get droopy here, Im not happy with the way it grows.  I've got a tree thats grafted and also a sweet tart seedling that both get droopy.   The seedling tree made some fruit this year.

This is the sweettart seedling




This one was labeled peach cobler, I think maybe its one you grafted Simon but not sure where this tree came from.


This one is cotton candy, I got this tree from plantogram, it made 1 fruit.


This one is a taralay also from florida, its growing nicely, this tree grows nice and strong and erect


This ones the winters tree, the fruit look like they sre getting close.



Brad Spaugh

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #616 on: August 21, 2021, 12:34:10 AM »
This year, my sweet-tart Mango Tree had over (40) fruit on the tree but one by one they cracked open on the tree with no seed. Looks like a total loss this year on my Sweet Tart.   

Sweet Tart With No Seed 8-14-2021

These fruits were not mature and so I guess the flowers were bloomed in April or later and the weather should be not too cold. Do you have record of when did the flowers bloom? I have a 2 years old graft (on mature rootstock) and this year it hold about 4 ST fruits and all of them are big the size of the Kent in store -- not a single cracked.

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #617 on: August 21, 2021, 12:42:46 AM »
Sweet tart seems to get droopy here, Im not happy with the way it grows.  I've got a tree thats grafted and also a sweet tart seedling that both get droopy.   The seedling tree made some fruit this year.




Isn't ST fruit should start have red tint color at this development stage?

The other fruit does look like a Peach Cobbler.

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #618 on: August 21, 2021, 01:43:57 AM »
The fruit isn't ready yet, probably another month or 2.  That tree is a sweet tart seedling, its not grafted.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #619 on: August 21, 2021, 03:06:25 AM »
Sapote,

I keep a photo record of all the fruit trees. Looks like I hit peak bloom in mid to late March 2021 at my location with this grafted Sweet-Tart. Below are a few photos from early, mid, and late March. At my other more inland location I am not getting fruit crack so I believe the cooler temps and earlier blooming at my location has something to do with the fruit splits with no seed.

Johnny



Sweet Tart Early Bloom (3-3-2021)


Sweet Tart March Bloom (3-13-2021


Sweet Tart Bloom Close up 3-13-2021


Sweet Tart Bloom 3-25-2021
« Last Edit: August 21, 2021, 03:15:40 AM by Johnny Eat Fruit »

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #620 on: August 21, 2021, 01:56:34 PM »
Sapote,

I keep a photo record of all the fruit trees. Looks like I hit peak bloom in mid to late March 2021 at my location with this grafted Sweet-Tart. Below are a few photos from early, mid, and late March. At my other more inland location I am not getting fruit crack so I believe the cooler temps and earlier blooming at my location has something to do with the fruit splits with no seed.

Johnny



Sweet Tart Early Bloom (3-3-2021)


Sweet Tart March Bloom (3-13-2021


Sweet Tart Bloom Close up 3-13-2021


Sweet Tart Bloom 3-25-2021

Johnny, your trees are looking fantastic! The structure on them is ideal and they should hold more and more fruit with each passing year. They have a great foundation for prolonged health and production. Keep up the great growing!

Simon

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #621 on: August 22, 2021, 02:31:08 AM »
Sapote,

I keep a photo record of all the fruit trees. Looks like I hit peak bloom in mid to late March 2021 at my location with this grafted Sweet-Tart.

This explains the crack. I have similar problem this year, and next year I will cut off all fruits before mid April. My big LZ holds about 7 big fruits now and these are from late flowers -- could be late April or even May. All of the early fruits from March or early April flowers were cracked and fell off.

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #622 on: August 22, 2021, 05:11:28 PM »
Isn't ST fruit should start have red tint color at this development stage?

My bad, I was mixed up ST and ST Maui, and the latter do have the red tint but I don't know about sweet tart.

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #623 on: August 23, 2021, 02:20:39 PM »


 

One thing members can experiment with is to remove the early blooms or the early fruit set. You just have to ensure there is enough time and cold weather so that there will be a second or third bloom. You can tell ahead of time if the fruit are nubbins or not because of the more rounded shape and increased lenticils.

Simon
[/quote]

Where do you make the cuts for rebloom? Take off most of the panicle? Below the panicle but above the terminal bud (from where the panicle blooms? Or below the terminal bud?
Thanks.

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #624 on: August 23, 2021, 11:30:04 PM »
I just remove all of the stalks or fruits + stems.

 

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