Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 107287 times)

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #625 on: August 24, 2021, 12:21:40 PM »
I usually remove the entire old panicles and there is usually an intercalation there where there are multiple buds. I just cut right below the old bloom spikes, often cutting some buds, but itís perfectly fine.

Sometimes my second blooms open in the rains or the weather is still very cold and I sometimes remove the second blooms early on to induce a later third bloom.

For Lemon Zest which is highly susceptible to Powdery Mildew, the first blooms are definitely no good for me at my location so I always remove them. The second blooms will sometimes set fruit but the third blooms set the most full sized fruit.

Simon

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #626 on: August 24, 2021, 12:28:04 PM »
I donít want to over complicate things but I do want to mention that sometimes letting nature take its course will work out. For LZ, if you let the first blooms naturally dry up and fall off, it takes longer for the second bloom to initiate so the time frame for these naturally occurring second blooms without gardener intervention will closely match the timeline of the third blooms if the gardener clipped the first and second blooms.

You just have to look at the weather forecast, the health of your tree and keeps close eye on rains, cold weather and the fungal pressures around the time BEFORE the blooms open.

If youíre using any fungicide, you should treat the trees and neighboring trees prior to the blooms opening.

Simon

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #627 on: August 24, 2021, 02:47:50 PM »
In addition to what Simon said, one can pick the timing based on other more reliable varieties, such as Peach Cobbler and Lancetilla. These trees tend to have late flowering, in April or so, but LZ flower too early. So next year, I will wait until PC and Lancetilla have flowers then let LZ holding its own flowers.

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #628 on: September 14, 2021, 07:13:50 PM »
Just a quick update on my Sweet Tart Mango Tree. Only (3) fruit made it without major cracking issues in 2021. I picked one fruit three days ago and let it ripened off the tree. Just ate it today. Fantastic tasting mango even if it was slightly on the overripe side. Deep orange color with a rich and complex taste, juicy. I did not detect any tartness likely due to the overripeness but never the less it was a great tasting mango. I could eat these all day. This and the Indian Grown Alphonso tie as the best tasting mangos I have had. Now I can see why this cultivar is hyped and mine was not even likely at peak flavor. A great mango indeed. I hope for a better crop in 2022. I applied some calcium to the root system of my tree and hopefully, this will help next year.

Johnny
« Last Edit: September 14, 2021, 07:21:10 PM by Johnny Eat Fruit »

Victoria Ave

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #629 on: September 14, 2021, 09:10:56 PM »
Awesome to hear Johnny! You propogsting those seeds or could you send them my way? Haha

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #630 on: September 15, 2021, 10:58:31 AM »
Hey Victoria,

Unfortunately, the Sweet Tart seeds are not viable. Underdeveloped embryo. Actually, I was lucky to get any fruit this year considering the poor pollination in early spring. Changing my micronutrient application for all of my mango trees and as previously mentioned pulling early flowers off my ST next year. If I can ever get this tree to consistently produce this tree would be worth its weight in gold for me.

If I was growing from seed good candidates are Cac, Seacrest, and Guava. All three grow fast at my coastal location and would even do better in your area. I would contact some of our Florida mango munching friends in June-July next year to see if you can get some seeds. I would get at least 6-8 of each and select the best one or two for planting in the ground.

Johnny

Victoria Ave

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #631 on: September 15, 2021, 01:35:27 PM »
Thanks for the in depth reply, I will give it a go next year and hope your new scheduling makes a better crop!

Madridje

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #632 on: September 15, 2021, 02:53:10 PM »
When would planting in the ground be best for seedling grown mangoes?

Would you prep the soil with anything or just go ahead an plant?

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #633 on: September 15, 2021, 06:01:58 PM »
If i manage to get a seed from the few mangoes that produced this year, should i plant it in ground right away, even though winter is just around the corner?

Mugenia

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #634 on: September 15, 2021, 07:02:35 PM »
👍 I am curious too. I just planted some sweet tart seeds in the ground and they are starting to sprout now. I am planning to cover them in the winter. Thanks.

If i manage to get a seed from the few mangoes that produced this year, should i plant it in ground right away, even though winter is just around the corner?

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #635 on: September 15, 2021, 09:01:20 PM »
The best time to start growing Mango Seedlings is April-June in SoCal based on my experience. I usually start them in 5-gallon pots. Move them up to seven-gallon containers a year later. Never tried to start mango seeds this late in the season. We are heading into the cool months soon and growth will stop by late November. Not sure how they will work for you. Pots are easier as you can move the small plants inside if necessary to keep them warm during the coldest periods. Greenhouses are better yet. Let us know how they work out. Hopefully, you will have some survivors. 

Johnny

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #636 on: September 16, 2021, 03:43:17 PM »
When would planting in the ground be best for seedling grown mangoes?

Would you prep the soil with anything or just go ahead an plant?

My favorite time is June to mid September when night temp is 60F and above.  Favorite location for SoCal: Eastern side of the structure that will provide shade in the hot afternoon.
I planted the seeds directly on ground without even bending my back: place the seed (not de-hushed) on top of soil, cover it with 3" layer of leaves to keep the seed from drying out and the sun (in nature the falling seeds grow in the bush or thick much of leaves). Water the pile every day until 4" shoot appeared, then cut down to once per week. This direct in ground way save me from dealing with transplanting the long tap root seedlings, and I'm lazy.

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #637 on: September 16, 2021, 04:27:14 PM »
When would planting in the ground be best for seedling grown mangoes?

Would you prep the soil with anything or just go ahead an plant?

My favorite time is June to mid September when night temp is 60F and above.  Favorite location for SoCal: Eastern side of the structure that will provide shade in the hot afternoon.
I planted the seeds directly on ground without even bending my back: place the seed (not de-hushed) on top of soil, cover it with 3" layer of leaves to keep the seed from drying out and the sun (in nature the falling seeds grow in the bush or thick much of leaves). Water the pile every day until 4" shoot appeared, then cut down to once per week. This direct in ground way save me from dealing with transplanting the long tap root seedlings, and I'm lazy.
The best time to start growing Mango Seedlings is April-June in SoCal based on my experience. I usually start them in 5-gallon pots. Move them up to seven-gallon containers a year later. Never tried to start mango seeds this late in the season. We are heading into the cool months soon and growth will stop by late November. Not sure how they will work for you. Pots are easier as you can move the small plants inside if necessary to keep them warm during the coldest periods. Greenhouses are better yet. Let us know how they work out. Hopefully, you will have some survivors. 

Johnny

Would a seed taken from a ripe fruit at the end of september be viable until june or should i just risk planting it as soon as possible and baby it through winter?

Madridje

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #638 on: September 16, 2021, 05:28:39 PM »
All the one's I have are in 1 gallon right now. I have only one in a 5 gallon.

How sensitive are mangoes when it comes to transplanting them from container to soil?


UplanderCA

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #639 on: September 17, 2021, 09:25:33 PM »
All the one's I have are in 1 gallon right now. I have only one in a 5 gallon.

How sensitive are mangoes when it comes to transplanting them from container to soil?

Madridje
In my opinion, mangos are easily transferred from containers to ground.   If you read thru this thread, you'll read up on some of the common issues with growing mangos in Southern California.  Simon has posted some instructions for planting mango trees.  The common issue is that some grafted trees (this will depend on the variety) from Florida don't do as well in California.  The growth will be extremely slow for the first couple of years (maybe a foot of growth) or unsatisfactory growth (such as droopy growth).  I have replaced three such trees after harvesting the scions (those were expensive scions!).   

I'm planting mango seeds and going the seedling route.  The seedlings have vigorous roots, don't forget to upsize the containers after a month (especially the 1 gallon pots).  You don't want the roots to be circling the bottom of the pots.

Cheers,
Tony

Victoria Ave

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #640 on: September 18, 2021, 08:07:59 PM »
Hey guys, I'm curious if Valencia Pride is usually this late in the season for SoCal. My tree didn't set fruit the first two flowerings this year due to what seems like bad water management on my part. A little cold snap later in the season cause a little bit of flowering and it hung on to one fruit with my revised watering schedule.

But this fruit is on the tree and no hint of yellow to it this far. I'm not complaining just wondering if it is typical.




Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #641 on: September 19, 2021, 03:36:00 PM »
Hey guys, I'm curious if Valencia Pride is usually this late in the season for SoCal. My tree didn't set fruit the first two flowerings this year due to what seems like bad water management on my part. A little cold snap later in the season cause a little bit of flowering and it hung on to one fruit with my revised watering schedule.

But this fruit is on the tree and no hint of yellow to it this far. I'm not complaining just wondering if it is typical.



I think I start seeing them in markets around now, but those are the ones grown in coachella valley.

It would be a little later riverside, and a bit later still more coastal.

shinzo

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #642 on: September 20, 2021, 03:48:05 PM »
Hey guys, I'm curious if Valencia Pride is usually this late in the season for SoCal. My tree didn't set fruit the first two flowerings this year due to what seems like bad water management on my part. A little cold snap later in the season cause a little bit of flowering and it hung on to one fruit with my revised watering schedule.

But this fruit is on the tree and no hint of yellow to it this far. I'm not complaining just wondering if it is typical.




Hi Victoria Ave,
Can you elaborate a little bit on the bad water management that led the tree not setting fruit and the revised watering schedule that resolved the problem? Thanks

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #643 on: September 21, 2021, 02:28:20 PM »
Finally got to try a sweet tart mango. It met all the expectations. I only got 2 sweet tarts this year so hoping for at least 2x next year.

Here are some pics and review.











Picked: 09/16/2021

Consumed: 9/21/21

Sweet Tart Nubbin (West Covina)

Weight: when picked 285grams. 262 grams when eaten (dont know if fruit loses weight as it ripens or if it is a scale issue

Exterior color: mostly yellow with green

Interior color : Deep orange almost apricot like color

Brix: 29 near seed. 31 near skin

Aroma: Complex smells sweet and piney.

Texture: the outside of the fruit was semi firm, not mushy nor wrinkly gave slightly to pressure. The inside very soft but not mushy or overly delicate. You could take a bite and it would hold its shape. But there is no need to chew. You can press the flesh with your tongue to the roof of your mouth and extract the syrup, then swallow the flesh.  The flesh was slippery with syrup. when cut the syrup gushed out of the mango slowly and clung to the knife. It was not watery like when cutting open a watermelon. It was similar ripe peaches only more viscous. The flesh was virtually fiberless.

Flavor: Sweet with some tartness on the back end. complex mango flavor. Flavor close to the skin more piney, resiney with cola syrup taste. Various different flavors are perceived with each bite. Goes from syrup sweet mango to pops of vegetal pineyness to tart overtones in a matter of seconds. Very hard to describe as you are thinking of one flavor another one barges in taking away your focus on the previous flavor. Makes it hard to put your finger on exactly what flavors are present. Fruit did not feel overly sweet given its very high brix. The tartness likely balanced the high sugar. Tartness was not overly strong, however, since the brix was at least 29 the fact that it was perceivable points to a strong tart flavor if brix had been lower. The tartness itself is not a citrus tartness but more of a sour candy (like the tart of sour belts). Outstanding overall fruit.

Negatives: the fruit was a nubbin and the husk had no seed.

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #644 on: September 21, 2021, 03:12:43 PM »
An excellent report on your Sweet Tart. Eating mine was an awesome experience too. I have another one ripening now on the counter and will be picking up (2) more at my Brother-in-laws house next week.

If I can solve the pollination issue in 2022 and should have over 40+ fruits on my tree next year.

Good Luck with your tree.

Johnny

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #645 on: September 21, 2021, 05:46:55 PM »
If I can solve the pollination issue in 2022 and should have over 40+ fruits on my tree next year.

I doubt the tree is large enough to hold 40+ fruits.

My 3 years old grafted scion holds 2 fruits for the first time. Not ripe yet. Burbank is hotter than Huntington Beach and so I'm surprised that your is ripening.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2021, 05:49:42 PM by sapote »

Madridje

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #646 on: September 21, 2021, 05:49:02 PM »
@Goyo626 & Johnny Eat Fruit:

Are your ST mango trees seedling grown or grafted?

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #647 on: September 21, 2021, 06:33:00 PM »
@Goyo626 & Johnny Eat Fruit:

Are your ST mango trees seedling grown or grafted?
grafted with manila rootstock. If i could start over i would try and get a sweet tart seed.

Madridje

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #648 on: September 21, 2021, 07:57:17 PM »
Why is that? Is it due to the rate at which its growing?


Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #649 on: September 21, 2021, 08:39:44 PM »
Why is that? Is it due to the rate at which its growing?

My grafted sweet tart gets droopy mid to late winter. Im hoping as the tree matures it grows out of the problem. A seedling is more likely to be more vigorous and have a tap root. Also a seedling wont flower for the first couple of years allowing for more growth flushes per year. I have had a couple of grafted trees that have flowered in their second year in ground which has slowed its growth. If i had to start over i would find members that are willing to sell polyembryonic seeds of top varieties and grow trees from seeds.

 

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