Author Topic: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California  (Read 317 times)

Victoria Ave

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Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« on: October 02, 2021, 09:13:38 PM »
Hi all, today I broke up concrete adjacent to my home as it was not really functional, and I would prefer less concrete and more trees.

This results in a planter bed 3.5' wide and 17' long (I will remove the the rest once gas company verifies line). The area is on the north east side of my home so trees recieve morning sun and afternoon shade in summer, until they grow into the sun. I think this will work well based on mango in trees around here (and that mango trees I planted in the full inland sun require shade cloth to grow well.)

I have seen several very mature mango trees planted right next to homes and walls with no structural damage and feel comfortable planting this close to my raised foundation, is this something I should second guess?

Plants are spaced 8' on center  in photo, from left to right 7' tall manilla seedling, 4' tall grafted Mallika, 5' tall multi branch espada seedling. Does this seem appropriate for socal?

Soil is clay/sand and will remain so with top few inches removed from the concrete replaced with amended soil, and then several inches of mulch to bring level with driveway. Iron/ sulfur and gypsum will be showed to soak in over our (hopefully) rainy season.

Anything I am overlooking? Thanks






spaugh

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Re: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2021, 09:48:32 PM »
Is all the south facing real estate taken?  North east is the worst side to plant a heat loving tree on.  Mangos thrive on that intense heat.  I dont think they will need any protection in full exposure even in riverside. 
Brad Spaugh

Victoria Ave

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Re: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2021, 09:58:15 PM »
On south side of the house I have a 4.5' wide concrete walk between the house and a cinder block wall which I could cut 3x3 tree wells into. I'm just worried about them getting roasted during our window of intense summers.

That said, I see many trees with southern exposure doing well.

If I were to flip, suggestions on fruit trees for north exposure? Was thinking cherimoya and coffee

yimnvs

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Re: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2021, 10:16:49 PM »
On south side of the house I have a 4.5' wide concrete walk between the house and a cinder block wall which I could cut 3x3 tree wells into. I'm just worried about them getting roasted during our window of intense summers.

That said, I see many trees with southern exposure doing well.

If I were to flip, suggestions on fruit trees for north exposure? Was thinking cherimoya and coffee

Mango loves to be roasted. Lol. I have a southeast wall which is painted brown and that area gets so steamy in summer, but my container mangoes love it.

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2021, 10:43:41 PM »
The Mango feeder roots have a limited amount of oxygen and available nutrients due to close proximity of concrete.

Not something I would do but let us know how it works out in 3-5 years. Will be interesting. The health of the mango root system determines, to a large extent, the health of the tree.

Johnny

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Re: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2021, 10:57:24 PM »
There is definitely a difference in a bay area roasting and inland empire roasting.

Johnny, that is a good point about the feeder roots. I have seen healthy large trees in small areas but perhaps they are not as productive. However, I have to work with what I've got

spaugh

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Re: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2021, 11:55:09 PM »
roasting is ok if its 105 or under, beyond that for many days in a row is going to be excessive. 

i think having the house shading the tree most of the day is worse for a mango than getting roasted.

its not quite as hot here at my location but its still a hot area of SD county and all my stuff gets full south facing exposure and no shades ever.  Mangos love the heat and full day sun. 
Brad Spaugh

sapote

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Re: Mango placement opinion, Riverside California
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2021, 03:14:25 PM »
trees recieve morning sun and afternoon shade in summer, until they grow into the sun. I think this will work well based on mango in trees around here (and that mango trees I planted in the full inland sun require shade cloth to grow well.)
Plants are spaced 8' on center  in photo, from left to right 7' tall manilla seedling, 4' tall grafted Mallika, 5' tall multi branch espada seedling. Does this seem appropriate for socal?
Soil is clay/sand and will remain so with top few inches removed from the concrete replaced with amended soil, and then several inches of mulch to bring level with driveway.

Your plan sounds good. North East side next to the house is perfect for Riverside. Even my place in Burbank is cooler, four mango seedlings I planted on the North East, 2.5' from the wall, are growing very well. One is holding fruits at 3 years old, and the others are over 5 feet tall with multiple top branches spreading which indicates they will also have flower next year. I prefer to planting mangoes on this cooler side than facing the hot sun on West, SW, or NW. I have 7 mango trees planted on the West side, one feet to 2 feet from the house wall, and they shade the wall for a cooler house during hot summer. I had to shade the trees in hot day above 95F, or the leaves, fruits,  and trunks would be damaged.  No damage to house or foundation at all, as mango has deep tap root as compare to citric, avocado, or Sapote which are destructive if planted near the wall.

8 feet between trees is too wide. I would prefer to have 4 feet between trees, then you will have 5 instead of just 3 trees.
I know every book and experts are talking about mango loving sun and hot ground, including the famed CRFG.org. But my 15 years experience in growing mango in SoCal, young mangoes prefer North East side of the house for protection. This is why in hot tropic places, we only see young seedlings grow in the bush and not wide open space with no protection from the hot sun. 

As about the soil level, to avoid root rotted during cold winter rain, I would bring the new soil level up to the surrounding concrete top level for drainage, then add wood chips on top if you like.

 

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