Author Topic: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's  (Read 24743 times)

Luisport

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #50 on: August 19, 2013, 01:12:21 PM »
Hello Luisport   It sounds like your are right next door to our Spanish friends. We will see it we can suggest to them to make you one of our field test locations.

To our other Tropical fruit loving friends.  We are looking for some field trial sites in the Southern Hemisphere.  We would like to make some new friends with people to work with on our cold hardy mangoes in Australia, Peru, Chile, Argentina and maybe a few other countries.  The only limitation we are placing on a site is they need to be in a Country that respects patent rights.  Any suggestions from our friends will be greatly appreciated.
WOW!!!! This would be just great! Thank's!  ;D

anaxel

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #51 on: August 19, 2013, 01:36:46 PM »
luisport,
you have your reply.
anaxel.

JF

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #52 on: August 19, 2013, 01:52:22 PM »
Hi all,

Dear JF,
I'm not a woman but a man aged 45 years, yes I live in France in zone 9a and also a house in the south of portugal of my parents (zone10a, setubal) place of my origins.

thank you.

HI TIM
thank you for answering me ,for your sharing ,of your experience ,your knowledge and your kindeness (it is good to read.).

Friendship.

anaxel

Anaxel, I apologize. Good luck with your mango in Portugal.

anaxel

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #53 on: August 19, 2013, 02:48:06 PM »
Hi jf,

nothing wrong.
friendship

anaxel.

Luisport

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #54 on: August 20, 2013, 06:41:00 AM »
luisport,
you have your reply.
anaxel.
;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Luisport

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #55 on: August 20, 2013, 07:04:24 AM »
JF - I had an afterthought regarding your nice Timotayo tree full of beautiful mango fruit.  When I have a lot of mangoes on my trees, I sometimes get bored just eating them plain so I decided to include a recipe section on my website with a large variety of different ways to include mangoes in various dishes.  I think you might find something you could use to utilize some of your mangoes.  Try my favorite:  mango coconut meringue pie.  The link is: http://www.socalplantbreeders.com/#!recipes/crd8

Anaxel - You asked what the low temperature limits of our new cold hardy mangoes is.  Our location is in city of Camarillo in Southern California.  We use two recording thermometers to monitor the temperatures where we grow the mangoes, unprotected, outdoors.  During the last 25 years we recorded three occasions where the temperature hit the mid 20 degree Fahrenheit range.  All of our new mango varieties survived while two large manilla mango trees died.  Most of our new varieties suffered some frost damage but recovered.  We had one variety that had no apparent damage and in Spring bloomed normally.  It also produced a nice crop of mangoes.  For that variety, we don't actually know what the lower temperature limit really is.
This recipes are great! :P

mangoprofessor

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #56 on: August 20, 2013, 10:56:46 AM »
to JF  From my visits to Florida, I know that Cubans are great cooks and even better bartenders.  We would love to have some of your Cuban mango recipes or drinks on the recipe page.  I just noticed we desperately need a good recipe for a mango margarita.  Do you have one?

The old guy

anaxel

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #57 on: August 20, 2013, 05:35:31 PM »
Hi all,
Recipe, cooked dish, bartender in all it's more recipe:
it smells good side of this, hummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, I like that.

HiTim,

I have three questions for you:
The seeds of your mangoes are polyembrionic?
Currently, you are in the project, a dwarf mango tree or is he already realized?
Currently, How much have you mango tree, resistant to cold? I mean, that resists higher temperatures 30F


anaxel.

JF

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #58 on: August 20, 2013, 09:21:12 PM »
Mango dry run was held today at my house. Top three were Edward, Glenn and Spirit of 76. LZ disappointed but I think it wasn't quite ready we'll try it again in the Sept. tasting. Timotayo held its own and came in the middle of the pack. Here is a pic how they looked yesterday.


ScottR

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #59 on: August 20, 2013, 10:45:02 PM »
Nice little cache of fruit there Joe, thanks for report!

Tim

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #60 on: August 20, 2013, 10:52:38 PM »
There's a JF mango?
Tim

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #61 on: August 21, 2013, 10:47:18 AM »
Anaxel   In answer to your questions, virtually all of our mango breeding is with mono-embryonic mango varieties.  As you probably know those do not come true to the parent if you plant mango seeds.  Each offspring is unique.  That is how we were able to get the variants we were looking for when it comes to low temperature tolerance.  Our mangoes do not seem to be effected by the higher end of the temperature scale.  I think that is because of their root system and leaf structure.  For example, Avocados have most of their root system in the top 5 feet of the soil they are growing in; Citrus are in the top 6 or 7 feet of the soil and a mature mango tree's roots may reach down to 20 feet.  In Southern California, when the Santa Ana winds start to blow, they are hot and dry.  Those winds will literally dry out a big avocado orchard if the farmers don't turn on their irrigation system so they use about 25 percent more water.  The leaf structure is also another factor when it comes to water consumption and high wind damage.  Of the three, the avocado leaf is the most fragile, citrus next and the mature mango leaf is tough and leathery.  The tougher leaves are the less vulnerable when it comes to wind damage.  When the Santa Ana winds blow strong here they may hit hurricane strength or 70 miles per hour.  The East side of my poor big Haas avocado tree is stripped of its leaves.  My mangoes just laugh at the wind.  After all mangoes evolved where they have hurricanes and typhoons.  I hope that helps you.  I don't know if you have those severe weather conditions in the part of France where you are located.  From what I am told, the French Rivera has a Mediterranean climate which should be more like our climate here in Southern California.

Luisport

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #62 on: August 21, 2013, 10:54:44 AM »
Anaxel   In answer to your questions, virtually all of our mango breeding is with mono-embryonic mango varieties.  As you probably know those do not come true to the parent if you plant mango seeds.  Each offspring is unique.  That is how we were able to get the variants we were looking for when it comes to low temperature tolerance.  Our mangoes do not seem to be effected by the higher end of the temperature scale.  I think that is because of their root system and leaf structure.  For example, Avocados have most of their root system in the top 5 feet of the soil they are growing in; Citrus are in the top 6 or 7 feet of the soil and a mature mango tree's roots may reach down to 20 feet.  In Southern California, when the Santa Ana winds start to blow, they are hot and dry.  Those winds will literally dry out a big avocado orchard if the farmers don't turn on their irrigation system so they use about 25 percent more water.  The leaf structure is also another factor when it comes to water consumption and high wind damage.  Of the three, the avocado leaf is the most fragile, citrus next and the mature mango leaf is tough and leathery.  The tougher leaves are the less vulnerable when it comes to wind damage.  When the Santa Ana winds blow strong here they may hit hurricane strength or 70 miles per hour.  The East side of my poor big Haas avocado tree is stripped of its leaves.  My mangoes just laugh at the wind.  After all mangoes evolved where they have hurricanes and typhoons.  I hope that helps you.  I don't know if you have those severe weather conditions in the part of France where you are located.  From what I am told, the French Rivera has a Mediterranean climate which should be more like our climate here in Southern California.
This is just great! When i start to buy and plant mango trees, everyone say i'm crazy... and i plant them with an inner feeling of loosing them in winter, but now you give me a real hope of have good quality mangos here in Portugal! Just for that i want to thank you so much!  ;D ;D ;D

JF

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #63 on: August 21, 2013, 01:11:36 PM »
Anaxel   In answer to your questions, virtually all of our mango breeding is with mono-embryonic mango varieties.  As you probably know those do not come true to the parent if you plant mango seeds.  Each offspring is unique.  That is how we were able to get the variants we were looking for when it comes to low temperature tolerance.  Our mangoes do not seem to be effected by the higher end of the temperature scale.  I think that is because of their root system and leaf structure.  For example, Avocados have most of their root system in the top 5 feet of the soil they are growing in; Citrus are in the top 6 or 7 feet of the soil and a mature mango tree's roots may reach down to 20 feet.  In Southern California, when the Santa Ana winds start to blow, they are hot and dry.  Those winds will literally dry out a big avocado orchard if the farmers don't turn on their irrigation system so they use about 25 percent more water.  The leaf structure is also another factor when it comes to water consumption and high wind damage.  Of the three, the avocado leaf is the most fragile, citrus next and the mature mango leaf is tough and leathery.  The tougher leaves are the less vulnerable when it comes to wind damage.  When the Santa Ana winds blow strong here they may hit hurricane strength or 70 miles per hour.  The East side of my poor big Haas avocado tree is stripped of its leaves.  My mangoes just laugh at the wind.  After all mangoes evolved where they have hurricanes and typhoons.  I hope that helps you.  I don't know if you have those severe weather conditions in the part of France where you are located.  From what I am told, the French Rivera has a Mediterranean climate which should be more like our climate here in Southern California.

Hi Tim, I'm familiar with the temps in southern France, my father is from Barcelona, and they are more like Portland Oregon. The only place in Europe that compares to SoCal in southern Spain and Portugal......mangos can be grown but in a greenhouse in France.

anaxel

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #64 on: August 21, 2013, 04:56:47 PM »
Anaxel   In answer to your questions, virtually all of our mango breeding is with mono-embryonic mango varieties.  As you probably know those do not come true to the parent if you plant mango seeds.  Each offspring is unique.  That is how we were able to get the variants we were looking for when it comes to low temperature tolerance.  Our mangoes do not seem to be effected by the higher end of the temperature scale.  I think that is because of their root system and leaf structure.  For example, Avocados have most of their root system in the top 5 feet of the soil they are growing in; Citrus are in the top 6 or 7 feet of the soil and a mature mango tree's roots may reach down to 20 feet.  In Southern California, when the Santa Ana winds start to blow, they are hot and dry.  Those winds will literally dry out a big avocado orchard if the farmers don't turn on their irrigation system so they use about 25 percent more water.  The leaf structure is also another factor when it comes to water consumption and high wind damage.  Of the three, the avocado leaf is the most fragile, citrus next and the mature mango leaf is tough and leathery.  The tougher leaves are the less vulnerable when it comes to wind damage.  When the Santa Ana winds blow strong here they may hit hurricane strength or 70 miles per hour.  The East side of my poor big Haas avocado tree is stripped of its leaves.  My mangoes just laugh at the wind.  After all mangoes evolved where they have hurricanes and typhoons.  I hope that helps you.  I don't know if you have those severe weather conditions in the part of France where you are located.  From what I am told, the French Rivera has a Mediterranean climate which should be more like our climate here in Southern California.
Hi Tim,
Thank you for your explanation.


example:winter temperatures in Madrid(19Fat night), as well as parts of northern Spain and Portugal, are lower than in my area, probably due to the altitude of the entire geographical area.
Only the ribs are usually milder , of more, Atlantic side, we have ocean currents up areas of Central America with rain.
in my area the temperatures do not drop below 23F clear time.
On overcast days, temperatures average 40F .
[/quote]


Anaxel   In answer to your questions, virtually all of our mango breeding is with mono-embryonic mango varieties.  As you probably know those do not come true to the parent if you plant mango seeds.  Each offspring is unique.  That is how we were able to get the variants we were looking for when it comes to low temperature tolerance.  Our mangoes do not seem to be effected by the higher end of the temperature scale.  I think that is because of their root system and leaf structure.  For example, Avocados have most of their root system in the top 5 feet of the soil they are growing in; Citrus are in the top 6 or 7 feet of the soil and a mature mango tree's roots may reach down to 20 feet.  In Southern California, when the Santa Ana winds start to blow, they are hot and dry.  Those winds will literally dry out a big avocado orchard if the farmers don't turn on their irrigation system so they use about 25 percent more water.  The leaf structure is also another factor when it comes to water consumption and high wind damage.  Of the three, the avocado leaf is the most fragile, citrus next and the mature mango leaf is tough and leathery.  The tougher leaves are the less vulnerable when it comes to wind damage.  When the Santa Ana winds blow strong here they may hit hurricane strength or 70 miles per hour.  The East side of my poor big Haas avocado tree is stripped of its leaves.  My mangoes just laugh at the wind.  After all mangoes evolved where they have hurricanes and typhoons.  I hope that helps you.  I don't know if you have those severe weather conditions in the part of France where you are located.  From what I am told, the French Rivera has a Mediterranean climate which should be more like our climate here in Southern California.

Hi Tim, I'm familiar with the temps in southern France, my father is from Barcelona, and they are more like Portland Oregon. The only place in Europe that compares to SoCal in southern Spain and Portugal......mangos can be grown but in a greenhouse in France.

Hi jf,
It is true that southern Europe and North Africa is the best place to grow the mango trees.
Now, if the mango Socal can withstood temperatures as low, I do not see where is the problem to try.
I do not know anything about the climate of Portland, Oregon.
They are magnificent your mangoes hummmmmmmm!, What chance do not have this problem of frost ;D ;D ;D.







Hi all,
ol luisport,
pleasure to know you luisport.
you're right, I agree with you, we need mango tree of california highly resistant to cold (20F =-6.6c), it is very difficult to reaching in this part of southern Portugal, the lowest is 40F (maximum at night).
there are some mango trees endure it and the drought in the region, they can be put in the ground, as gommera 13-1 mango tree of spain, it resists very low temperatures with periods of drought.

anaxel.
I'm trying kent and osteen... but this will be the first winter on grownd, so i don't know how it will stand!

Hi luisport,
cuidado com as pequenas mudas de mango kent e osteen,porque o frio sem ser cobertas,abaixo de 0 C pode morrer.

anaxel.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2013, 05:40:55 PM by anaxel »

Luisport

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #65 on: August 22, 2013, 03:15:48 AM »
Yes of course, i will try everything to protect and save them... but of course i dream with this cold hardy trees!  ;D

BestDay

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #66 on: August 22, 2013, 11:04:52 AM »
Nice looking pile of mangos. I'm jeolous.

Bill

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #67 on: September 02, 2013, 01:04:54 AM »
I figured I'd let everyone see how the Tequila Sunrise mangoes are coming along...
I snapped this picture while shooting for our latest video.



LEOOEL

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #68 on: September 03, 2013, 10:34:47 PM »
I'm impressed with all the progress being made towards the production of quality, cold tolerant mango varieties. With all due respect, I really want to say, good job everybody!
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

MangoFang

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #69 on: September 03, 2013, 11:18:39 PM »
thanks, Tony, they do look delicious !!!!!!!

By the way, how do I sign up to attend Tim's mango tasting in September?


Gary

simon_grow

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #70 on: November 20, 2013, 12:57:37 PM »
Hello MangoProfessor,

I was just wondering if you have considered giving some of your mango trees multiple rootstocks to increase precocity, increase production, decrease alternate bearing and possibly increase disease resistance. I know that there are space, time and cost constraints but it would be very cool and informative to multiple rootstock several token trees to compare with traditionally planted trees in about 5-10 years.

I'm especially interested if multiple rootstock trees are more resistant to the cold and disease. Every 10 years or so, we get hard frosts here in SoCal and this type of experiment could provide lots of beneficial information. I like seeing the Ag industry think outside the box to make transformative,leap wise, advances instead of continuing the norm. The possible dwarfing affect reported by some partitioners of multiple rootstock technology may have hidden benefits such as decreasing the cost of pruning in later years.

The increased precocity may also make up for the additional up front cost of the extra rootstocks and for the labor involved with innarching the young trees together.
Simon

simon_grow

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #71 on: November 21, 2013, 11:54:28 AM »
MangoProfessor,

I was also wondering if you have tried grafting newly sprouted seedlings onto older established mango trees in hopes that you the mature rootstock would induce the young scion to flower and fruit much earlier? If it works, perhaps you can shave off a couple years before you evaluate each variety.

I tried this last year by grafting scion from one of Eunice Messners Edwards mango sprout onto my established In ground Manilla mango tree. I'll report back later this year if the graft and rootstock flower or if just the rootstock flowers. I think what you are doing with breeding cold tolerant mangoes is absolutely Awesome. Your cold tolerant rootstock will be in high demand both here in San Diego and in Florida if trials end well. Please keep us updated on your wonderful new Mango varieties!
Simon

Moorpark Guy

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #72 on: November 23, 2013, 03:38:34 AM »
Hello mango professor, and all fellow Ventura county people. I also like in VC in Moorpark and regularly  visit mr.omar/a tropical fruit grower in Camarillo,Ca. He has multiple mango trees which he has grew from seed, and fruit regularly.. He also has a huge mamey sapote tree in his house(which flowers regularly, multiple guava,dragon fruit, and other fruit trees in his backyard.

mangoprofessor

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #73 on: March 07, 2014, 10:15:40 PM »
Reply to Simon_grow's question. Nearly all fruit trees that are grown from seed go through a juvenile stage before they fruit for the first time.  Out of about 5,000 mango seedlings that I have grown to maturity, the earliest time to maturity has been about five years, most take double that time.  We fruited three mango trees last year in 2013, that were planted as seeds in 1994 and 1995.  These included the Parrot mango that we showed pictures of the fruit last year in a post on the forum.  If you graft a piece of budwood from a seedling onto a mature tree, the hormones for maturity in the adult tree will transfer to the budwood and you can induce early blooming and fruit bearing.  The big problem is the statistics are working against you.  Out of every 1,000 seeds we planted in our breeding program, only about 1 out of 100 would grow and tolerate mildew and frost.  Out of the 5,000 seeds we planted, we now have about a dozen that bear fruit in quantity and the fruit also taste good.  One of last years first time fruiting mango trees that had passed all the other tests we have for a new mango variety, failed the final test.  When our 5 person tasting panel sampled the fruit, each of our tasters had the same reaction: yuk!

Growing a mango tree from seed is like hoping to win the lottery.  You can't win the lottery if you don't buy a ticket.  If you are lucky and plant a mango seed, you might just grow a blue ribbon mango winner.  Our advice: Go for it!

Mango Professor   

shaneatwell

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Re: Atten CRFGer's New cold tolerant Mango's
« Reply #74 on: March 08, 2014, 12:02:43 AM »
From your presentation to north county CRFG I thought that about 500 survived the mildew and frost selection?
Shane

 

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