Author Topic: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?  (Read 8565 times)

NewGen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
  • Zone 10a, Central Valley, CA, USA
    • View Profile
Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« on: April 17, 2014, 12:35:43 PM »
My Haas has been in the ground for over a year. The last few weeks have seen some new growth flush, even flowers. But overall, there are still a bunch of sick-looking leaves, and the whole tree just doesn't look as green as expected. I water it with drip irrigation about 3 times a week, for 8 minutes each time. Can it also be nutrient deficient? I sprinkled some Citrus & Avocado fertilizers around the canopy a month ago, and flooded the soil around it (there are bananas next to the avocado as well). What can you tell from the photo?
Thanks,
 
« Last Edit: April 17, 2014, 08:51:33 PM by NewGen »

mikesid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 740
    • Zone 10B Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2014, 12:42:02 PM »
My Nishikawa is still small, a 3 gallon planted last year, but I've ceased watering mine at all and pulled back all the mulch about 3 feet off the tree. It would get brown spots on the leaves like yours even if I watered it once. The rain seems to have no effect on it even if it rains days in a row. Maybe it was something in my water that was causing it, but it seems to do fine without my help. But if your climate is very dry I guess you may need to supplement once in a while...
« Last Edit: April 17, 2014, 12:45:13 PM by mikesid »

Josh-Los-Angeles

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 137
    • Zone 10B, Sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2014, 01:21:49 PM »
Avocados lose their old leaves. When they do, the leaves look really ill, all brown and sickly. They're replaced by new growth every season.

That said, 8 minutes for drip irrigation is barely anything unless you're just blasting it with water. If you have 1 gal emitters, you're basically putting 2 cups of water around the tree, that's barely enough to get the mulch wet, let alone get the water to the deep roots. Also, I found I was underfeeding my avocados. I use an organic Dr. Earth mix and do the full recommended strength.

NewGen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
  • Zone 10a, Central Valley, CA, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2014, 01:54:34 PM »
thanks a lot, I will make some changes.

bangkok

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2823
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2014, 02:57:34 PM »
Well i don't have much avocado experience but my tree got leggy like yours. I think i also overwatered mine and it was in to much shade.

My avocadotree also can't keep it's branches up, they are drooping. I pruned it 2 times now and it grew many sidebranches. I also will give it less water this time. It is in full sun.

If this tree is fruiting then it will break without support. I think i would prune it and try to grow it more solid and tree-shaped.

robbyhernz

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 89
    • Tubac, AZ
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2014, 03:25:50 PM »
Will an avocado grown from a pit give fruit? I've read mixed opinions...

SWRancher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 608
  • Merritt Island, FL Zone 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2014, 04:14:27 PM »
Will an avocado grown from a pit give fruit? I've read mixed opinions...

Generally not for many years if ever. When/if it does bear fruit there is no guarantee on the quality of that fruit. Buying a grafted tree for 30-40 bucks is likely one of the the best investments you'll ever see for time saved and fruit quality.   

NewGen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
  • Zone 10a, Central Valley, CA, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2014, 08:31:21 PM »
Please let me know what you guys think of these black areas on a few branches of the tree.  Thanks,
« Last Edit: April 17, 2014, 08:50:41 PM by NewGen »

Mr. Clean

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1184
  • MangosByMail.com
    • US, FL, West Palm Beach, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2014, 08:38:26 PM »
Will an avocado grown from a pit give fruit? I've read mixed opinions...

Generally not for many years if ever. When/if it does bear fruit there is no guarantee on the quality of that fruit. Buying a grafted tree for 30-40 bucks is likely one of the the best investments you'll ever see for time saved and fruit quality.

I think this is good advice.
www.MangosByMail.com

110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

Mr. Clean

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1184
  • MangosByMail.com
    • US, FL, West Palm Beach, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2014, 08:42:16 PM »
It also depends on your soil type.  Avocados should never be flooded.  They say too little water is better than too much water.  That being said, my micro irrigation goes on for about 50 minutes daily; I have sandy soil, so the water drains away rapidly.  I am in south Florida with different types of avocados. 
www.MangosByMail.com

110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

ScottR

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1898
    • USA,Arroyo Grande,Calif. 93420,zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2014, 10:23:38 PM »
NewGen, last pic of your avocado looks like freeze damage! Did you have below freezing temps this last winter?

NewGen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
  • Zone 10a, Central Valley, CA, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2014, 10:41:18 PM »
Not freezing, but during the artic freeze weeks, it did get down to low 30s, which is somewhat unusual. I lost 2 soursops, some jackfruit, and a papaya. I was glad the avo made it. Are you thinking that the black marks are leftovers from the cold period?

ScottR

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1898
    • USA,Arroyo Grande,Calif. 93420,zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2014, 11:14:08 AM »
Yes, or sun burn?

Ed of Somis

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 76
    • Ventura Co, Ca
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2014, 08:36:35 PM »
Some excellent advice from some here regarding watering avos. Avos love water. That being said....know what type of soil you have. If it is sand...water VERY often. With clay (I have it) you do the dance of drowning or underwatering. You must probe, dig, and feel around the rootzone. Roots do not go deep (24-36 inches) with avos. Keep in mind...small/young tree have a limited root ball. Keep the water on target.

raymondetc

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 20
    • Malaysia, Sabah, Keningau.
    • View Profile
    • Experimental Farming
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2014, 08:53:59 AM »
Please let me know what you guys think of these black areas on a few branches of the tree.  Thanks,
Am in Borneo where there is no winter (tropics), I get lots of plants( grafted) with these black spot and they eventually dies off. I think it's due to the heat wave, too hot and that area got dehydrated too fast. If it's at the top, I usually prune it off and seal with tress dressing.

raymondetc

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 20
    • Malaysia, Sabah, Keningau.
    • View Profile
    • Experimental Farming
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2014, 08:56:34 AM »
Some excellent advice from some here regarding watering avos. Avos love water. That being said....know what type of soil you have. If it is sand...water VERY often. With clay (I have it) you do the dance of drowning or underwatering. You must probe, dig, and feel around the rootzone. Roots do not go deep (24-36 inches) with avos. Keep in mind...small/young tree have a limited root ball. Keep the water on target.
Yes, I agree (tropics). When its' raining, we get root rot, when dry season the soil (clay) gets harden.

Mr. Clean

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1184
  • MangosByMail.com
    • US, FL, West Palm Beach, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2014, 09:13:29 AM »
Some excellent advice from some here regarding watering avos. Avos love water. That being said....know what type of soil you have. If it is sand...water VERY often. With clay (I have it) you do the dance of drowning or underwatering. You must probe, dig, and feel around the rootzone. Roots do not go deep (24-36 inches) with avos. Keep in mind...small/young tree have a limited root ball. Keep the water on target.
Yes, I agree (tropics). When its' raining, we get root rot, when dry season the soil (clay) gets harden.

Perhaps put it on a mound.
www.MangosByMail.com

110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

zands

  • wango_tango_mango_zango
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4376
    • Zone 10b, Florida, USA, 33321
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2014, 11:45:28 AM »
I mulch all trees but not for avocados. I just removed the mulch I had there. From now on it only gets a little compost and cow manure on top of the soil and some 8 3 9 ground fertilizer. Some foliars too
« Last Edit: April 19, 2014, 11:47:53 AM by zands »

Cool_man

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
    • USA, CA Bay Area, zone 8
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2014, 12:23:44 AM »
Since avocado does not like standing in water, When I planted my avocado 3 years ago,  I just put the tree at the spot I want to grow then build up compost around the root ball to the trunk level, water it well everyday, just add more compost when it settled down, my tree grow much faster than expected, almost triple in size especially the trunk size, full of fruit in the third year. Avocado loves water but does not like to be water logged, just make sure the soil drain fast then yours should grow like crazy, btw I used strictly pine needle compost from the neighborhood, just gather them up and let them compost for about a year before using them, no fert needed. The old leaves tend to get brown spots the drop, as long as the new growth look good I would not worry about it.
Hope this help
What ever I can grow

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4187
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #19 on: April 20, 2014, 08:27:04 AM »
btw I used strictly pine needle compost from the neighborhood, just gather them up and let them compost for about a year before using them, no fert needed. The old leaves tend to get brown spots the drop, as long as the new growth look good I would not worry about it.
Hope this help

I mulch with about 4" of fresh pine needles both outside and inside of my greenhouse.  Veggies love it.  You'll build up needed humus over time and moderate moisture levels.  You're trying to replicate a forest floor littered with compost, leaves, etc.

You guys that are in clay (like I am) need to go with raised beds using the RootBuilder system!  You can start with a 24" diameter pot and add panels like I do or go with enough length to make whatever size you need from the get-go.  Here's my thread FWIW:
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=7511.msg96609#msg96609

NewGen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
  • Zone 10a, Central Valley, CA, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2014, 02:26:31 PM »
Thanks all for your advice. Much appreciated.

Mark,
Do the roots of your avo penetrate the soil underneath the rootbuilder pot, or are they confined within the pot?

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4187
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2014, 03:47:35 PM »
Thanks all for your advice. Much appreciated.

Mark,
Do the roots of your avo penetrate the soil underneath the rootbuilder pot, or are they confined within the pot?

Haven't tunneled under to find out but I'm sure they've dug deep.  That assumption being based on the incredible vigor on top.

NewGen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
  • Zone 10a, Central Valley, CA, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2014, 04:39:23 PM »
Do avos need sun protection? I've read conflicting reports. Summer here is hot and dry. My lone avo tree is in partial shade. I'd like to plant a couple more. Not sure if I should do full sun. Thanks,
Thanks all for your advice. Much appreciated.

Mark,
Do the roots of your avo penetrate the soil underneath the rootbuilder pot, or are they confined within the pot?

Haven't tunneled under to find out but I'm sure they've dug deep.  That assumption being based on the incredible vigor on top.

Cool_man

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
    • USA, CA Bay Area, zone 8
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado: what are the signs of overwatering?
« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2014, 10:32:07 PM »
Mine is grown in the middle of the yard where there is no shade at all, you should paint the expose lateral branch with white wate base paint to protect it from sunburn, after a year or two the canopy should be enough to protect the branch from sunburn, also I'd noticed that trimming the tree do that it can have a wide canopy is much better then let it grow tall and leggy, at least the canopy can protect the tree from the summer heat and winter frost. The freeze last year in NorCal only burn the top leaves but everything else underneath was well protected and flourished once the weather warmup.
What ever I can grow

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk