Author Topic: Linda macadamia nut  (Read 5736 times)

wslau

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Linda macadamia nut
« on: April 05, 2014, 01:28:24 AM »
Anybody have more information on the Linda macadamia nut (heritage, taste, size, hard-shelled?) or have one of these trees?
I saw these trees at my local Home Depot ($24), but I know they can also be directly purchased from Clausen's Nursery in Vista, CA (I think they are the propagator...so maybe a Vista creation?).  I could not find any literature on the Linda variety, unlike the established Cates and Beaumonts that have been sold in Southern California for decades. 

I believe Linda's are a hard-shelled variety based on its spiny leaves.  I also think these Linda's sold are seedlings or air layered, as I could not see a graft line on the trees. 
« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 02:42:11 AM by wslau »
Warren

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2014, 01:38:30 AM »
I bought my Cate seedling from HD a few years ago for about the same price at 5-6ft and it's flowering for the first time this year. Not sure if it'll set fruit yet.

They're likely to be seedlings since it's easier than airlayer.

Jack, Nipomo

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2014, 10:11:09 AM »
Problem with a seedling, of course, is that it will not be true to type.  One of the nurseries sells macadamia trees thru HD that carry a label identifying the tree as a "Cate".  On the reverse of the tag it is identified as a seedling.  I thought we were past this selling seedlings as a specific identifiable, predictable genetic type.  Given 10 years looking at a "Cate" seedling production and that of a true grafted or airlayered CATE, would lead to inevitable differences.  Growers need predictable outcomes, especially after an investment of time and $.  Ten years from planting the seedling's crop could just be junk.  Difficult enough differences caused by climate, soil, water quality, etc.  A seedling is a seedling, nothing more.  May be better, may be worse than parent(s).  To expect a specific outcome from a seedling's variability is unreasonable, and most people know that. So do the nurseries.

Of the 50 or so macadamias I raise, about a half are seedlings of unknown parentage.  Many, if not most, produce excellent nuts.  Some, not.  Of the 14 named varieties, grafted, nut quality corresponds with known standards. I don't think we should expect anything less.

Seedling trees graft easily as long as the scionwood is girdled about 3-4 months before cutting.  Results are close to 100%.

Josh-Los-Angeles

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2014, 10:14:45 AM »
I've had decent luck just calling the nursery and asking for info. They usually like pitching their products. If you do talk to them, please report back, Linda sounds interesting :)

wslau

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2014, 11:44:42 AM »
I've had decent luck just calling the nursery and asking for info. They usually like pitching their products. If you do talk to them, please report back, Linda sounds interesting :)

Josh,
That was a good idea....

I called Clausen this morning and they acknowledged that they have the mother tree...its been around for decades ...so its probably only propagated by them.
Linda is a cross between Beaumont and Jordan (sp?).
Like Beaumont, it produces fruit all year....unlike Cate which produces in a shorter time period.
Fruiting year-around has its advantages and disadvantages according to Clausen.
Since macadamias have a long shelf life, I'm thinking short season or all year-around fruiting doesn't really matter to the home grower.  For year-around varieties, Clausen mentioned that you will have to deal with pests (birds, squirrels, tree rats, etc) year-around.
Linda trees that are sold at HD are seedlings, but Clausen says they are very close to the parent.  They will fruit in 3-4 years from purchase, as they are already a few years old before they get to HD.
Linda can be grown in coastal or inland areas..
Linda produces medium-sized hard-shelled nuts.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 06:53:48 PM by wslau »
Warren

Josh-Los-Angeles

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2014, 12:18:10 PM »
Thanks for making the call Warren, that's awesome :) Sounds like Linda is an alternative (maybe an improved version) of Beaumont. Did they mention anything about nuts dropping or needing to pick them off the tree? My understanding is Beaumont needs to be picked while most other macs drop the nuts.

wslau

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2014, 12:45:40 PM »
Thanks for making the call Warren, that's awesome :) Sounds like Linda is an alternative (maybe an improved version) of Beaumont. Did they mention anything about nuts dropping or needing to pick them off the tree? My understanding is Beaumont needs to be picked while most other macs drop the nuts.

I didn't ask that question, but my friend has two Beaumonts and the nuts do drop in LA county.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 01:06:52 PM by wslau »
Warren

cmichael258

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2014, 01:37:09 PM »
Thanks for making the call Warren, that's awesome :) Sounds like Linda is an alternative (maybe an improved version) of Beaumont. Did they mention anything about nuts dropping or needing to pick them off the tree? My understanding is Beaumont needs to be picked while most other macs drop the nuts.

Not to worry...the squirrels will pick them before they can drop.    >:(
Michael

huertasurbanas

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2014, 02:33:33 PM »
Thanks to Jack, Nipomo,

Learning about girdling

http://www.avocadosource.com/CAS_Yearbooks/CAS_44_1960/CAS_1960_PG_89-92.pdf

"Results of two other experiments indicated that accumulation of some material
contributes to the seasonal variation in grafting success. One of these dealt with use of
scion wood from a branch or shoot which had been girdled by removing a ring of bark at
least six weeks before the scion wood was cut.  The results (table 2) show that pregirdling of the scion wood consistently gave an increase in per cent graft take during the
summer months. This beneficial effect of pre-girdling, at certain times of year, is in
agreement with results in Hawaii with macadamia and litchi  (1, 3), in Florida with
macadamia and sapodilla (2), and in California with macadamia (5) and eucalyptus (4)."

Josh-Los-Angeles

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2014, 09:12:22 AM »
Hey Warren, did you end up buying the Linda mac tree? If so, did you get it from HD or Clausen and how'd it look?

wslau

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2014, 10:57:09 AM »
Hey Warren, did you end up buying the Linda mac tree? If so, did you get it from HD or Clausen and how'd it look?

Josh,
Yes, I did buy the Linda macadamia nut tree.  I got it for a little under $25 at Cypress HD, but the tree was grown by Clausen's.
Its pretty tall for a 5 gallon and is very healthy and branching.  Orange County-Cypress HD still had some when I stopped by last week.  I have not planted the Linda tree in the ground yet, even though my other Cate tree did bite the dust during the May heat wave.

« Last Edit: June 14, 2014, 10:58:55 AM by wslau »
Warren

Josh-Los-Angeles

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2014, 04:56:44 PM »
Thanks Warren, sorry to hear about the Cate, the tree looks good!

Mike T

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2014, 06:55:35 PM »
http://era.deedi.qld.gov.au/1964/14/mac-varieties.pdf
http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/Nuts/macadamia.htm

The number of varieties in my neck of the woods keeps increasing and people are getting confused about which is best in different situations.

ScottR

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #13 on: June 14, 2014, 09:44:32 PM »
Mike, I'm always amazed with the detailed information you guy's put into your fruit crop's much more detailed than you find in the U.S.I guess that's what happens when you put money in the right place! :o 8)

nanewnanew

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2021, 08:12:09 PM »
Hey Warren, did you end up buying the Linda mac tree? If so, did you get it from HD or Clausen and how'd it look?

Josh,
Yes, I did buy the Linda macadamia nut tree.  I got it for a little under $25 at Cypress HD, but the tree was grown by Clausen's.
Its pretty tall for a 5 gallon and is very healthy and branching.  Orange County-Cypress HD still had some when I stopped by last week.  I have not planted the Linda tree in the ground yet, even though my other Cate tree did bite the dust during the May heat wave.

It's been some time, did the Linda end up producing well?

wslau

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2021, 05:19:07 AM »
Itís at a friendís place in Glendora.  Will get a report/update soon.  I havenít seen it in years.
Warren

wslau

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2021, 09:42:21 PM »
The tree is now about 7 feet tall.
I thought it would be way bigger than that after all these years.
I was told it hasnít fruited yet, but probably should by next year... being 7 years old already.



Warren

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2021, 10:29:09 PM »
Wow, yeah I thought it'd be taller too. Thanks for the update.

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2021, 09:37:51 AM »
I am not surprised by the poor growth of that macadamia seedling tree. I had the same issue with my Beaumont tree over 10 years ago. I suspect the native soil is heavier clay type. At my location, I replaced over 1.5 yards of my heavy clay with sandy soil and after I did this my tree took off.  It is not a good idea to plant seedling macadamia trees because even in ideal conditions it will take 8-10 to start to produce nuts and since the tree is Not true to type you never know what you're going to get. It's a big risk and a long wait with seedling trees. Both of my trees are grafted. The Beaumont is 10 years old and the Alba is seven years, about the same age as your seedling. Both grafted trees started to produce at four years of age. Also, macadamia trees like water and grow best with heavy applications of water. I also make several light applications of sulfer twice a year to lower the ph of the soil. They do poorly if the PH is too high.

Enclosed are a few recent pictures of my two trees. The nuts I got last year were excellent.

Johnny



 

Alba Macadamia Tree (7 years old)


Beaumont Mac Tree

nanewnanew

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2021, 11:35:04 AM »
I am not surprised by the poor growth of that macadamia seedling tree. I had the same issue with my Beaumont tree over 10 years ago. I suspect the native soil is heavier clay type. At my location, I replaced over 1.5 yards of my heavy clay with sandy soil and after I did this my tree took off.  It is not a good idea to plant seedling macadamia trees because even in ideal conditions it will take 8-10 to start to produce nuts and since the tree is Not true to type you never know what you're going to get. It's a big risk and a long wait with seedling trees. Both of my trees are grafted. The Beaumont is 10 years old and the Alba is seven years, about the same age as your seedling. Both grafted trees started to produce at four years of age. Also, macadamia trees like water and grow best with heavy applications of water. I also make several light applications of sulfer twice a year to lower the ph of the soil. They do poorly if the PH is too high.

Enclosed are a few recent pictures of my two trees. The nuts I got last year were excellent.

Johnny



 

Alba Macadamia Tree (7 years old)


Beaumont Mac Tree

Thanks Johnny, beautiful trees.

How do you add sulfur (can you link to a product)?

A few more specific questions:

Do both trees produce continuously throughout the year?
Which tree has the better tasting nut? If you could only choose one, which would it be?
Will you prune it to keep it smaller?


Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2021, 02:51:38 PM »
I use sulfur pellets applied lightly to the lawn to keep the PH below 7.0.

Here are a few tips I learned over the years on what Not to do when Planting and growing Macadamia Trees. 

1.  Do not plant macadamia Seedling Trees. Plant only Known Grafted cultivars like Beaumont, Cate, Alba exct. (Seedling trees most commonly sold at the big box stores and many nurseries should be avoided)

2.  Do not plant in Heaver clay soil. You will not have long-term success. Mac Trees love sandy soil and grow very, very poorly in clay soil.

3.  Water frequently. Mac Trees do not do well without regular watering around all the root ball. Sprinklers are often not enough.

4.  Avoid overfertilization. Mac trees are especially sensitive to Phosphate. This is the second number in (5-3-4). Use only organic fertilizers and keep the 2nd number low.


I have two trees and they both have pros and cons. My alba is the faster growing of the two, produces consistently larger nuts, and thus far seems to outproduce my Beaumont. 

The Beaumont macadamia tree is the most attractive and ornamental of the two. The nuts are smaller but the oil content is higher in the Beaumont. Most people including myself prefer the flavor and creaminess of the Beaumont nut over the Alba but to be honest both taste excellent and are way better than the store nuts by a Huge factor. If you want the highest quality nut and best-looking tree go for the Beaumont. If you want faster growth and more production go with the Alba. If you already have a seedling tree in the ground good luck as you don't know what you have. Your likely in for a long long wait to find out.   

Johnny


« Last Edit: May 18, 2021, 02:53:56 PM by Johnny Eat Fruit »

Pedroboy

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2021, 02:56:26 PM »
I am not surprised by the poor growth of that macadamia seedling tree. I had the same issue with my Beaumont tree over 10 years ago. I suspect the native soil is heavier clay type. At my location, I replaced over 1.5 yards of my heavy clay with sandy soil and after I did this my tree took off.  It is not a good idea to plant seedling macadamia trees because even in ideal conditions it will take 8-10 to start to produce nuts and since the tree is Not true to type you never know what you're going to get. It's a big risk and a long wait with seedling trees. Both of my trees are grafted. The Beaumont is 10 years old and the Alba is seven years, about the same age as your seedling. Both grafted trees started to produce at four years of age. Also, macadamia trees like water and grow best with heavy applications of water. I also make several light applications of sulfer twice a year to lower the ph of the soil. They do poorly if the PH is too high.

Enclosed are a few recent pictures of my two trees. The nuts I got last year were excellent.

Johnny



 

Alba Macadamia Tree (7 years old)


Beaumont Mac Tree

Thanks Johnny, beautiful trees.

How do you add sulfur (can you link to a product)?

A few more specific questions:

Do both trees produce continuously throughout the year?
Which tree has the better tasting nut? If you could only choose one, which would it be?
Will you prune it to keep it smaller?

Apart from the question of maintaining a lowered pH, my understanding is that Phosphorous is not a native component of Australian soil, so I tend to tread lightly there - Alaska Fish Emulsion 5-1-1 seems to fit the bill pretty well. It's kind of my go - to anyway for a lot of new/tender stuff -since it's not going to burn anything. When I think to collect it, I also toss a couple handfuls of seaweed into the mix - for Iodine and trace elements. Seems to be getting a little scarce on my local beaches these days, though.


Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2021, 03:41:03 PM »
Your 5-1-1 fish emulsion should work excellent with Macadamia nut trees.  The sulfur I bought years ago in a larger 25lb bag. It's the same stuff blueberry growers use to lower the PH. They are white pellets and should not be hard to find.

The most important lesson I learned over the years is to avoid heavier clay soils. Many areas like Pico Rivera, Alhambra, Downey, and Pasadena have beautiful sandy soil so this will but be an issue but unfortunately in my area and many parts of Orange County and Long Beach, the soil is not well suited for Mac trees.  The only viable option is to remove and replace a significant amount of the clay soil when planting if you live in an area with heavy clay soil.   

Johnny

Pedroboy

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2021, 04:42:18 PM »
Yup - that South Bay clay is no joke. As my handle might suggest, I grew up in the Port of LA and still visit family in those parts regularly. Last fall I rescued a Sharwil Avocado from my brother's neighbor in Harbor City. EVERY leaf tip on the thing was brown and crispy.  Surprised me, because that slightly inland corridor running up thru Lomita, Carson, Hawthorne and Lawndale gets blazing hot - at least compared to Palos Verdes and Redondo.
I figured you'd have to be working overtime to kill the thing by overwatering.

Fast forward 8 months, and the tree is leafing out nicely in its new, mounded up home. Jury's still out on whether Sharwil's genetics (along with its parent Greengold) are a good match for my cooler maritime setting long term though...

 

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