Author Topic: Linda macadamia nut  (Read 5618 times)

nanewnanew

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #25 on: May 20, 2021, 10:34:40 PM »
I am not surprised by the poor growth of that macadamia seedling tree. I had the same issue with my Beaumont tree over 10 years ago. I suspect the native soil is heavier clay type. At my location, I replaced over 1.5 yards of my heavy clay with sandy soil and after I did this my tree took off.  It is not a good idea to plant seedling macadamia trees because even in ideal conditions it will take 8-10 to start to produce nuts and since the tree is Not true to type you never know what you're going to get. It's a big risk and a long wait with seedling trees. Both of my trees are grafted. The Beaumont is 10 years old and the Alba is seven years, about the same age as your seedling. Both grafted trees started to produce at four years of age. Also, macadamia trees like water and grow best with heavy applications of water. I also make several light applications of sulfer twice a year to lower the ph of the soil. They do poorly if the PH is too high.

Enclosed are a few recent pictures of my two trees. The nuts I got last year were excellent.

Johnny



 

Alba Macadamia Tree (7 years old)


Beaumont Mac Tree

Thanks Johnny, beautiful trees.

How do you add sulfur (can you link to a product)?

A few more specific questions:

Do both trees produce continuously throughout the year?
Which tree has the better tasting nut? If you could only choose one, which would it be?
Will you prune it to keep it smaller?

Apart from the question of maintaining a lowered pH, my understanding is that Phosphorous is not a native component of Australian soil, so I tend to tread lightly there - Alaska Fish Emulsion 5-1-1 seems to fit the bill pretty well. It's kind of my go - to anyway for a lot of new/tender stuff -since it's not going to burn anything. When I think to collect it, I also toss a couple handfuls of seaweed into the mix - for Iodine and trace elements. Seems to be getting a little scarce on my local beaches these days, though.
When you say both trees started to produce at 4 years of age, does that mean 4 years after planting a tree that was already 2-3 years old (and grafted, in a container), or one to two years after planting that same tree?
Also, can you prune these trees to stay at, say 15 feet tall and still be good producers?
« Last Edit: May 21, 2021, 12:27:31 AM by nanewnanew »

Jack, Nipomo

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #26 on: May 21, 2021, 10:33:13 AM »
Nothing wrong with seedling trees if you are willing to wait 10-12 years to determine nut production and quality.  Then again, the seedling tree can be grafted with a known variety with known characteristics, and shorten the time to nut production considerably. I have a number of seedling trees that produce well.  I would not wait the years to find out if I had just a few trees.  Macadamias graft easily when the scionwood is girdled a few months before grafting.  Seeds germinate easily and can provide lots of rootstock to graft to.  Questions sometime show up about the use of hybrid (m. integrifolia X m. tetraphylla as rootstock.  I have used straight m. tetraphylla for my rootstock over the years without issues.  m tetraphylla does like our 300 ft of dune sand soil and cooler climate and tend to be more robust than M. integrifolia.  Hybrids (like Beaumont) also do well (beautiful dark leaved tree, red veins, pink flowers).  Then, there is the continuing issue of "roof rats, palm rats, attic rats, etc"(all the same rat) that really enjoy the nuts.  Continuous trappng keeps the numbers down.

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #27 on: May 21, 2021, 11:37:10 AM »
My two Mac trees started to produce nuts four years after I planted them in the ground. They were in 15-gallon containers when I purchased them at Atkins Nursery years ago.  Excessive trimming will reduce nut production.

Jack is right about seedling trees I just did not want to wait 10+ years. If your patent and have good sandy soil go for it.

The original Linda mother tree at Clausen's Nursery does seem to produce well but the trees that are being sold now are all seedlings of the Linda. Clausen does not graft Macadamia trees but Atkins does.

Enclosed are a few photos of the original Linda Macadamia tree taken in 2019.  The tree is quite large.

Johnny

Lina Macadamia Tree at Clausens


Linda Mac Tree
« Last Edit: May 21, 2021, 11:51:05 AM by Johnny Eat Fruit »

nanewnanew

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #28 on: May 22, 2021, 12:12:32 AM »
Problem with a seedling, of course, is that it will not be true to type.  One of the nurseries sells macadamia trees thru HD that carry a label identifying the tree as a "Cate".  On the reverse of the tag it is identified as a seedling.  I thought we were past this selling seedlings as a specific identifiable, predictable genetic type.  Given 10 years looking at a "Cate" seedling production and that of a true grafted or airlayered CATE, would lead to inevitable differences.  Growers need predictable outcomes, especially after an investment of time and $.  Ten years from planting the seedling's crop could just be junk.  Difficult enough differences caused by climate, soil, water quality, etc.  A seedling is a seedling, nothing more.  May be better, may be worse than parent(s).  To expect a specific outcome from a seedling's variability is unreasonable, and most people know that. So do the nurseries.

Of the 50 or so macadamias I raise, about a half are seedlings of unknown parentage.  Many, if not most, produce excellent nuts.  Some, not.  Of the 14 named varieties, grafted, nut quality corresponds with known standards. I don't think we should expect anything less.

Seedling trees graft easily as long as the scionwood is girdled about 3-4 months before cutting.  Results are close to 100%.
I only have room for a few trees so y'all have convinced me to go for grafted varieties, thanks for the advice.

Out of curiosity Jack, because you grow a lot of seedlings, is it your experience that most seedlings don't produce for 10-12 years after planting the seed? And what percentage of the seedlings would you say never produce at all?

I'm asking because nurseries tell you that seedlings are generally close to being true to seed, and I just don't see how they get that.

Also, what do Cate nuts taste like, and are their shells significantly thinner?

Jack, Nipomo

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #29 on: May 22, 2021, 02:34:58 PM »
Seedlings I have grown start producing a very limited quantity of nuts 10-15 years after planting.  The quantity increases each year.  My climate is a cool coastal one with day temps in the mid 70s, nights in low 40s during our summers.   Many do produce good nuts (they are macadamias!), just a few have nuts with an opening in the shell, or a deformity of some type.  Still, most seedlings produce good nuts, just takes a long time.  Grafted ones are quicker and nut quality is predictable.  All my trees produce, eventually.  I have Cate, since it is a commercial variety, but for me, it is a poor producer, average sized, nothing special.  Again, our climate is very different from the San Diego area where Cate is commonly grown.  I only have one Cate for comparisons.  Here, there are far better varieties. I have 12 grafted producing trees (some duplicates) and 26 seedlings, most producing various quantities based upon age.  Seedlings were planted after grafted ones.  Many of the macadamias have approx 12 in trunk caliper and are on drip irrigation, fertilized yearly with rainfall.

If I were to pick a variety to grow here, it would be Beumont. HAES 752, and HAES 747 are good.  Z-3 has the sweetest nuts and the largest (that may not be crackout size).  Several seedlings also have large nuts.

In our climate the trees grow like weeds, only pests are the tree rats.  Not bothered by frost now, newly planted trees were killed by frosts (no freezes happening in recent years).

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2021, 08:53:07 PM »
I love my Beaumont Macadamia Nut tree. Beautiful growth and excellent nut quality. Probably the best nut tree for SoCal growing in our mild climate.

It is ironic in that I spend much time and effort on trying to grow mango trees and thus far have little to show for it. I spend little time on my Beaumont Mac tree and have much worthwhile. 

The photo was just taken to illustrate. The tree is 10 years old.

Johnny



Grafted Beaumont Macadamia Nut Tree (8-20-2021)
« Last Edit: August 21, 2021, 09:13:06 PM by Johnny Eat Fruit »

Sam

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Re: Linda macadamia nut
« Reply #31 on: August 22, 2021, 07:33:29 AM »
Which variety, if any at all, would do best in tropical conditions?

 

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