Author Topic: Looking for warm weather raspberries.  (Read 2607 times)

Vrod142

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Re: Looking for warm weather raspberries.
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2024, 12:12:42 AM »
Golden himalayan raspberry and atherton raspberry doing fantastic . Atherton flowering and fruiting. Golden himalayan is doing good, it got huge! But no flower yet. Imma see if I can find some indian raspberry!

Rispa

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Re: Looking for warm weather raspberries.
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2024, 12:23:04 AM »
Awesome to hear. I put some varieties in the ground from Ison's. I'm waiting to see if they even leaf out. I want that yummy raspberry taste from my yard

a_Vivaldi

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Re: Looking for warm weather raspberries.
« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2024, 12:58:41 PM »
Spring is in full swing so I can start seeing some results.

Mysore raspberry, at least the one I have, died to the ground but is coming back strong. This winter low was 17 F. It took full sun like a champ and showed none of the disease and heat intolerance issues that are affecting my European raspberry plants. I'll try laying some canes down and covering them with straw the coming winter, and will probably pot up a few canes so I can move a few indoors when it gets really cold. I wanna taste these things next year...

My bababerry was actually a wineberry. Willis nursery. Awful experience with every single order I placed with them. Never again. Wineberry does fine in the heat, but it's a pain to manage, sprawls a lot, tip roots if it so much as brushes up against the ground for a few seconds, and has really mediocre berries.

Tayberry has very long, sprawling canes. The blackberry genetics made a big difference during the summer heat. Surprisingly, I had a fair bit of winter dieback. The plant should be blooming soon though, looking forward to trying it.

Vrod142

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Re: Looking for warm weather raspberries.
« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2024, 09:01:30 AM »
Here the Atherton raspberry that fruited for me here in FL. Flavor is ok, not bad not great just ok. Its very mild, sweet, barely any tartness. Im ok with it so Im definitely keeping it. Plant is super healthy and thriving. It is the first time it fruits, I got from someone who grew it from seed so maybe thats why the fruit taste the way is tasted but lets see.





Rhythm

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Re: Looking for warm weather raspberries.
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2024, 11:15:50 AM »
Here's part of my list of berries to try
[ ] Sherbert berry
[ ] Rubus ‘ItSaul Summer’ Everbearing Raspberry
[ ] Indian summer rasberry (Rubus idaeus) (Willis)
[ ] Dewberry
[ ] Mysore rasberry
[ ] Dorman red rasberry
[ ] Rubus phoenicolaseus (Japanese wine berry)
[ ] Rubus spectabillis (salmon berry)
[ ] Rubus indicus (Indian rasberry)
[ ] Rubus Californica (California blackberry)

I spent most of my life in the Pacific Northwest, and I doubt you would be happy with the Salmonberry. It tends to grow prolifically on the coast - in the margins - roadsides, ditches, clearcuts, etc. It's fruit is light orange in the limited light conditions you often find it, and gets that redish burnishing you see in some pics only when out in full sun all day, where it tends to struggle. While I definitely ate plenty of them when I stumbled across ripe ones, I never set out to pick them as they were almost always too bland to really enjoy, the best ones were still not nearly as flavorful as blackberries, thimbleberries, wild strawberries, raspberries or blackcaps. They generally had a very low amount of sugar and not a very distinct flavor. Also being from the PNW coast, where they get LOTS of rain and very moderate temps, I would imagine they would have a difficult time growing in TX.

While the later comments about growth apply to thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) as well, they actually do have a very nice flavor similar to raspberry with reasonable sweetness (and no thorns). The main issue with them, is that the fruit is incredibly soft. They always went straight into the mouth. Picking into a container virtually guarantees having a pile of red goo. Perhaps if you could cultivate, and pick them cleanly enough that you could dump the goo into a juicer without needing to sort or clean, you could get a very tasty juice for jelly etc.

Rispa

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Re: Looking for warm weather raspberries.
« Reply #30 on: April 24, 2024, 12:44:01 AM »
Here's part of my list of berries to try
[ ] Sherbert berry
[ ] Rubus ‘ItSaul Summer’ Everbearing Raspberry
[ ] Indian summer rasberry (Rubus idaeus) (Willis)
[ ] Dewberry
[ ] Mysore rasberry
[ ] Dorman red rasberry
[ ] Rubus phoenicolaseus (Japanese wine berry)
[ ] Rubus spectabillis (salmon berry)
[ ] Rubus indicus (Indian rasberry)
[ ] Rubus Californica (California blackberry)

I spent most of my life in the Pacific Northwest, and I doubt you would be happy with the Salmonberry. It tends to grow prolifically on the coast - in the margins - roadsides, ditches, clearcuts, etc. It's fruit is light orange in the limited light conditions you often find it, and gets that redish burnishing you see in some pics only when out in full sun all day, where it tends to struggle. While I definitely ate plenty of them when I stumbled across ripe ones, I never set out to pick them as they were almost always too bland to really enjoy, the best ones were still not nearly as flavorful as blackberries, thimbleberries, wild strawberries, raspberries or blackcaps. They generally had a very low amount of sugar and not a very distinct flavor. Also being from the PNW coast, where they get LOTS of rain and very moderate temps, I would imagine they would have a difficult time growing in TX.

While the later comments about growth apply to thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) as well, they actually do have a very nice flavor similar to raspberry with reasonable sweetness (and no thorns). The main issue with them, is that the fruit is incredibly soft. They always went straight into the mouth. Picking into a container virtually guarantees having a pile of red goo. Perhaps if you could cultivate, and pick them cleanly enough that you could dump the goo into a juicer without needing to sort or clean, you could get a very tasty juice for jelly etc.
Thank you for all the great info! I've got some trialing in ground now. Though I'm not sure if it'll work out. I'm thinking of I get dormant plants I need to get them during winter, not spring because by then it's already too warm

 

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