Author Topic: Mango tree for central florida  (Read 453 times)

Flgarden

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Mango tree for central florida
« on: July 16, 2022, 12:53:42 PM »
Hi all,
Please help me to pick a mango variety that:
Small to medium size tree,
Great bacterial/fungal resistance
Taste great when firm
Fiberless
Taste wise classic is fine
Have greater chance to survive in winters (will protect it to some point)

So far looks like i narrowed it fown to:
Pickering
Cogshall
Edgar
Glenn

I appreciate your professional opinion!!

Ana

johnb51

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Re: Mango tree for central florida
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2022, 02:52:33 PM »
I'm definitely not a professional, but I'd say NOT Cogshall, very middle-of-the-road mango.  I've only tasted Edgar once years ago (good).  Glenn is good when the flavor isn't washed out.  That leaves Pickering, which I had success with and enjoyed at a previous house.  Mahachanok and Angie were also very good although not exactly "classic" in flavor, but I think you can control their size pretty well.
John

TonyinCC

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Re: Mango tree for central florida
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2022, 04:27:10 PM »
Edgar has many good points but I think it would be a dirty looking tree unless it is in a windy spot with good air circulation around it in your yard. I am close to the coast and every year I am on the fence about top working it because it gets some sooty mold and BBS. It bears heavy at an early age, has a long season,stays small,and is just below top tier quality. I can start harvesting some mature green fruit in late April as soon as the top of the fruit gets just a hint of yellowish tan. Those ripen decently in 7-14 days. Unlike a lot of other varieties,it holds well on the tree and I usually eat the last fruit in early August. Last year I lost about 20 percent of remaining fruit to BBS starting the first week of July. As long as you harvest tree by then BBS shouldn't be a big issue.If you don't mind spraying for the sooty mold/BBS it should be a contender as an only tree.
Pickering is one of my latest blooming trees if frost is an issue at normal mango bloom time. Not a good mango to pick mature green, best when they are about to drop and then wait a couple days before eating. Great productivity,tree health and  compact tree footprint, good sized fruit with a broadly appealing flavor. Fruit after harvest can last longer than most without developing off flavors. Another fruit that is just below elite status when properly picked and ripened , but overall a favorite of many and one of the best choices for a single tree. Pickering's harvest window is it's only shortcoming. Average season for this mango for me is about 6 weeks,but they start to drop as they get ripe so they won't hold on the tree.
  Little Gem is another to consider.Small tree, very precocious and productive, with a potential harvest window from June to mid September. Fruit accidentally knocked off ripen decently as early as mid June,but I start picking July 15th. A few fruit hold as late as mid September. Fruit hold well on tree and on the table for a long time without developing off flavors. Later season fruit can be very coconutty. It is our family favorite but is a rich Indian/West Indies flavor which not everyone  prefers. Depending on harvest time, it can be very similar to Dwarf Hawaiian, Carrie, Julie,and Graham. It is like having a cocktail tree of those varieties. Fruit and tree seem spotless and free of disease. If I could only have one tree it would even

TonyinCC

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Re: Mango tree for central florida
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2022, 04:30:18 PM »
Edgar has many good points but I think it would be a dirty looking tree unless it is in a windy spot with good air circulation around it in your yard. I am close to the coast and every year I am on the fence about top working it because it gets some sooty mold and BBS. It bears heavy at an early age, has a long season,stays small,and is just below top tier quality. I can start harvesting some mature green fruit in late April as soon as the top of the fruit gets just a hint of yellowish tan. Those ripen decently in 7-14 days. Unlike a lot of other varieties,it holds well on the tree and I usually eat the last fruit in early August. Last year I lost about 20 percent of remaining fruit to BBS starting the first week of July. As long as you harvest tree by then BBS shouldn't be a big issue.If you don't mind spraying for the sooty mold/BBS it should be a contender as an only tree.
Pickering is one of my latest blooming trees if frost is an issue at normal mango bloom time. Not a good mango to pick mature green, best when they are about to drop and then wait a couple days before eating. Great productivity,tree health and  compact tree footprint, good sized fruit with a broadly appealing flavor. Fruit after harvest can last longer than most without developing off flavors. Another fruit that is just below elite status when properly picked and ripened , but overall a favorite of many and one of the best choices for a single tree. Pickering's harvest window is it's only shortcoming. Average season for this mango for me is about 6 weeks,but they start to drop as they get ripe so they won't hold on the tree.
  Little Gem is another to consider.Small tree, very precocious and productive, with a potential harvest window from June to mid September. Fruit accidentally knocked off ripen decently as early as mid June,but I start picking July 15th. A few fruit hold as late as mid September. Fruit hold well on tree and on the table for a long time without developing off flavors. Later season fruit can be very coconutty. It is our family favorite but is a rich Indian/West Indies flavor which not everyone  prefers. Depending on harvest time, it can be very similar to Dwarf Hawaiian, Carrie, Julie,and Graham. It is like having a cocktail tree of those varieties. Fruit and tree seem spotless and free of disease. If I could only have one tree it would even edge out Pickering for the spot.

Flgarden

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Re: Mango tree for central florida
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2022, 02:32:59 PM »
Adam from FFF  is a little north from me and he likes his cogshall ... So hard to pick...looking into little gem.

johnb51

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Re: Mango tree for central florida
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2022, 06:00:54 PM »
Adam from FFF  is a little north from me and he likes his cogshall ... So hard to pick...looking into little gem.
For what it's worth, I planted Little Gem earlier this year, based on all the good things I've heard, including flavor description.  I figured I needed something in that flavor group.  I had classic, citrus, pineapple/coconut, and SE Asian covered.  But you might really like Cogshall.  You should try it, but too late for this mango season.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2022, 06:03:37 PM by johnb51 »
John

Kiko

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Re: Mango tree for central florida
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2022, 12:10:18 PM »
The Glenn and Pickering are semi dwarf, good fruit.

 

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