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Messages - pineislander

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Thief Caught
« on: September 13, 2023, 01:15:48 PM »
Canít wait to retire ! , buying  mountain top hone in PR off the grid , no neighbors, HOA, nothing but nature Ö.

Fruit thievery happens in Puerto Rico and throughout the Caribbean.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pineapple growing vertically?
« on: July 25, 2023, 08:31:35 PM »
He describes use of bangsite for flower induction. However, it is carbide and doesnt produce ethylene gas as he says, it produces acetylene which does the same thing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIkV7XRSv1U

3
I like the idea of RFID tags as I want to move towards an agritourism system. The idea would be so that self guided tour guests could get as much info as they want. But someone mentioned the QR code which doesnt require a RFID reader.

Does anyone know if high quality weather resistant QR tags might be available?

This could link to a website or video about the item and be read by anyone with a now ubiquitous cell phone camera.

4
Can nobody help me with further information?

5
I'm scheduled to give a workshop explaining how to judge mango maturity on the tree.
I have some references already and a good video by JFP films out of Africa but am wondering if anyone on the forum might know of some other specific references I could use? I understand the basic rising shoulders, lenticels changing from white to yellow finally brown, and stem/peduncle drying out. Id like to go fairly deep, beyond what a homeowner might want to know.

Can anybody add some references to help me go deeper?
It doesn't matter if it gets technical chemically or metabolic processes, I will try to adapt the information to a less informed audience. Thanks to anyone for help!

Here is the best video reference in case you'd like to know. Excellent explanation,animation, etc.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4qSHrepLL8

6

I am growing in south Florida. Maybe you folks got something different. I got the World's best direct from Bryce Garling and they are comparable to Thai Dwarf.
Not sour.
It's also possible that the variety performs differently in Florida compared to California. In our springtime we regularly get temps into the 80's or approaching 90's and around 70 at night. How does that compare with the temps you folks are seeing when yours fruit?

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Finding Land in South FL
« on: May 30, 2023, 09:37:55 AM »
For me, I like the idea of putting an RV on it, getting a management company and throwing it on Airbnb. Then it isn't sitting vacant most of time, deterring squatters and (some) theft. Yes there's strangers on it, but a different clientele, so should be a worthy trade off. Plus the added income opens up your price ceiling a bit.
It's such a hard time to buy here right now.
Note to other natives: yes, I realize that encouraging someone to move here from out of state is against The Code, but I would like to argue leniency in the case of growers. I would trade my newest neighbor for Jabo in a heartbeat. ... Maybe we should institute a draft!
There may be some areas you could put an RV but other areas that isn't allowed. Don't count on it but they did get lenient in my area but only temporary because of hurricane recovery. The regulations in Florida are ridiculous not at all like Tennessee or other rural states.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Finding Land in South FL
« on: May 30, 2023, 09:35:09 AM »
Ok, so thank you for the advice everyone.
I talked with my parents and we came to the conclusion that my 1/4 acre in the middle of Florida isn't a good idea lol. First off, I'm worried about frosts (couldn't do coconuts). and second, there is nothing to do within a 1.5 hour drive. lodging would be a pain too.
They'd rather buy a land themselves in a better location with things to do.
I'm eyeing Pine Island now. It's a beautiful place with a great microclimate too. Can grow basically whatever I want.
Now, the main problems are going to be my absence from the land if it ended up happening.
I was thinking of doing a salak hedge or something to keep intruders out.
And I thought I could just plant the trees and leave...but looks like they need to be watered regularly for the first few years.
I was hoping to just spam down a bunch of bananas and coconuts. Top tier fruits and coconuts are always producing. Coconuts seem like it's just plant and forget.
I guess the others may be tougher like mango. Also would have to plant away from the street too.
But still, if I'm only at the land 6 or so times max a year, something could always happen.
That's more than I thought I had to think about :P

Im on Pine Island so anything you are looking at just get in touch. Regarding absentee I do know a fellow who planted 1/4 acre mango plot and set up a wireless camera system so he could watch his trees. They are only just planted not bearing yet but he got pleasure sitting in Atlanta admiring his trees on the screen. He eventually sold the lot. It was 13820 Stringfellow Road, you can see it on Google Maps.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sea weed
« on: May 24, 2023, 04:57:56 PM »
There is some evidence that iron from Saharan dust is part of the reason for proliferation. In the ocean, iron is often a limiting nutrient.
http://railsback.org/Fundamentals/SFMGFeasnutrient02.pdf

Back in the 90's some were proposing a scheme to use the great Southern Ocean where hardly anybody goes as a giant carbon sink to absorb CO2 just by spreading iron in the sea down there. It might make more sense than many proposals currently in vogue. You could turn it off very quickly by stopping if negative concerns came about.

10
The only tree I gave up on was Muntingia calabura. It grew into a huge beast in just a few years and made some Ok small fruit.
The problem came when it started throwing out dozens of root suckers up to 50 feet away by year 4. It had to go.

11
So it seems mexicola can be egg shaped as well. According to UCR:

Yup, based on the Miami Fruit box photo alone, I'd say shape is unreliable for ID. New flush color might be better, Mexicola has more red than many Mexican types, Joey has almost no red.
Not all avocados are the same shape. Much commercial fruit is culled out so that you don't see the variation in shape.

12
It matches my Mexicola planted by Treehouse Nursery Pine Island SWFL.



13
One thing about tasting is that individual fruits can vary. I know of one couple who came down and would go out to a vendor then taste test a different mango every day. They had no idea of the ripeness and kept hating on a variety based on their first taste of fruit which wasn't picked right or representative. I offered to let them try a better example, mentioned that they were getting a poorly picked or underripe fruit but they felt I was hating on them. Even from year to year there can be a lot of difference so besides being personally subjective it sually takes a few tries to really get to know what flavor they can have.

14
Yes, grows just like the air potato or other yams and dormant in winter. I don't have any left this season. There should be a lot next fall. This is what they looked like on the fence just before Hurricane Ian blew them all off:



15
I have had good success with Xanthosoma sagittifolium as a root crop. Common english name is Tannia, common Spanish names are malanga or Yautia. This is different from Taro which is Colocasia esculenta. The Xanthosoma is a native american plant, takes much longer than the large taro and needs far less water. It also keeps in the ground much better. You can eat the cormels like potatoes, and even the large 4 inch diameter stems are edible. They work in fairly shady spots within fruit tree areas but just outside the canopy. I got a start with grocery store cormels but within a few years I have unlimited planting material at any time.
The big advantage is they are available year round and can be dug and used whenever, versus cassava which goes bad quickly after harvest or gets hard if left too long in the ground, or yams which have limited dormancy and are unavailable mch of the year.
The second best new staple I am growing is an edible Dioscorea bulbifera yam. This came from India originally but mine was sent from Puerto Rico. This is a completely edible type of "air potato" which is the bane of Florida, except is an edible form, very smooth skin and good eating. While seasonal the same as other yams this one is perennial in the ground and you never have to dig the "mother", just pick the potatoes off the vine. I put in a 100 ft row on a fence last year.



16


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpaYcdb4bN0
Very good detailed information. I have more than 50 in the ground some are 5 years old and fruiting. Last year I planted out 30 pots in the ground. I have 50 more pots to plant out this year. They are easy and live well around tree crops. I have sold a few but agree the fruit harvest and profit is uncertain. Regardless of everything I enjoy looking at them.

17
With lots of use, the rubber on pruners tends to slip and ruin the tool. Almost all of them. For me, that is a deal-killer if the rubber isn't very well done, not something quick dipped in liquid rubber.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is aquajem on ebay legit?
« on: December 13, 2022, 09:50:18 PM »
There must be one of us in Florida Keys where the seller says is their location. If I lived nearby I'd try to make a visit just to see how they are doing business.
Back in the '60's when I was a kid I got ripped off ordering stuff from comic books with my 'hard earned' money. I got taken by the "sea monkeys" (brine shrimp eggs) then the "monster that grows green hair" (piece of cardboard with chia seeds glued on). So, at a very early age developed a distaste for scammers.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Evil weevils
« on: December 07, 2022, 06:27:44 PM »
Mango can easily overcome some leaf damage so I don't worry about weevils. Who knows what the roots look like but even with heavy weevils mangos still do fine. Leaf damage is much heavier on Lychee and Longan, still they bear.
The damage seems to be selective, not all mangos get eaten, other varieties in the same grove are unaffected. I notice that stressed trees get eaten worse.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Anybody know aquagem on ebay?
« on: December 03, 2022, 06:18:48 PM »
https://www.ebay.com/itm/394260607889?hash=item5bcbc37391:g:iN4AAOSwpDtjMlUJ

This is an 8 inch seedling avocado for $34. No way should that be described as
"Semi-Dwarf Weeping Holiday Avocado starter tree! Large Delicious Fruits!"

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Anybody know aquagem on ebay?
« on: December 03, 2022, 06:03:15 PM »

22
Very difficult to establish trees under large dominant trees, oaks, pine, whatever. They are called "dominant" for a reason. Ironically, some eucalypts are being used as nurse trees, while young, to good effect because of their extreme fast growth and coppice ability. The dominance hasn't taken place and frequent hard pruning seems to stop allelopathy.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Laurel Wilt Avocado (Stump or Remove)
« on: December 02, 2022, 08:23:02 AM »
Stump remover is supposed to work.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnL_depDcfg

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« on: November 26, 2022, 10:08:23 PM »

OK please keeps updated on that investigation.

There are also some plant species that trap nematodes in their roots.

I can report after this season that the Jack Bean I am growing does form galls on the roots from nematodes. So, I am assuming that its primary effect is from the break down of its plant chemicals.

Interesting that you mention the trapping. I just read an article claiming that radish can be used to reduce nematode levels even though it is susceptible. Apparently, radishes are typically harvested so quickly (28 days) that most nematodes do not have a chance to reproduce (typical life cycle is 3-6 weeks). Upon harvest, many nematodes are removed with the radishes since it is a root crop. It got me thinking that this could be a really fast way to rid a spot of nematodes. Just grow several fast crops of radish, solarize the harvest in bags, and then compost. This could probably be done with any number of crops as long as they were pulled up by the roots in three weeks time or so.
I hardly ever pull out jack beans because I'm seeking them as nitrogen fixers but am wondering if what you are seeing might be the nodulation rather than galls?

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What's wrong with these bananas?
« on: November 18, 2022, 03:36:52 PM »
A well grown healthy Dwarf Nam Wah will make 10 or more hands.
Here is a comparison set of photos which can help identify Nam Wah vs Blue Java. The difference is clear enough but there are many out there mixing these up. Some tissue culture plantlets can be off-type and mislabeling does happen.
 


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