Author Topic: tree labeling  (Read 21181 times)

Future

  • The Future
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2025
    • View Profile
Re: tree labeling
« Reply #50 on: November 21, 2013, 07:19:35 PM »
After years of trying several materials and system, I use now only stainless steel labels. Size 75 x 35 mm. Ordered some 500 to a metalworkshop with a laser cutting machine. Welding wire of diameter 1mm or 0.6mm to fix. Also some left overs from stainless cables can do the job, when split into reasonable thickness.
The text is stamped with a set of ABC letters from 3 mm height and nowadays also sometimes 4mm to highlight capitals. I have also 3 and 4 mm numbers.

With small trees I hang simple with a loop the label on a branch or stake (also for bushes) That the wood grows over the wire is no problem as long as it is stainless.
When trees are older I drive the u hook into the bark with an old screwdriver. Later on it overgrows nicely and the wire sticks beautifully out, with the hanging label.
Hereby some just made new ones:

Leo


This looks great.  How much did you pay per label?

mangaba

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
    • Brazil,Pernambuco,Recife
    • View Profile
Re: tree labeling
« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2013, 07:52:08 AM »

This Dymo labelwriter can do metal labels.
    I have a Dymo labelwriter quite similar to the one pictured. It does not do a good job on strips of aluminium cans. The plastic embossing wheel does not emboss well on aluminium.
    I am looking for a metal embossing system or metal letter punch. Any suggestions on models and aprox price ?
                                                       
                                                          mangaba   

Oceanus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • Central FL, 9B (25 to 30 F)
    • View Profile
Re: tree labeling
« Reply #52 on: August 25, 2023, 05:19:29 PM »
No association, just thought these looked good and thought may would like to know of this new option.

https://signsfortropicals.com/

Daintree

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1133
    • Boise, Idaho - zone 6, with a zone 12 greenhouse...
    • View Profile
Re: tree labeling
« Reply #53 on: August 25, 2023, 11:09:22 PM »
I just use white plastic "T stake" plant markers and write on them with a paint pen. On one side I print the common name, on the other I put the botanical name. 

Each plant also has an aluminum tag with a code that includes year, plant #, material type (seed, plant, cutting etc), source (collected in the wild, fruit stand, nursery etc), and its assigned acession number. Abbreviations, of course, and those soft tags you engrave with a ballpoint pen.

I have about 150 trees.

Carolyn

W.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 636
    • United States, Alabama, 7b
    • View Profile
Re: tree labeling
« Reply #54 on: August 26, 2023, 08:18:07 PM »
My caveat to this thread is that all my plants are container plants, though the majority of the year, those plants (and their associated plant labels) are outside in the weather.

I use aluminum from drink cans for my plant labels. It is not so thick that it cannot be embossed into but is thick enough that it will withstand wear. I cut the top and bottom off the can, then unroll and flatten the side. I use an empty ballpoint pen (empty because I do not want ink getting all over the place) and place the aluminum on a surface with some give, not a hard surface. On my labels, I write the scientific name, common name or names, date I acquired the plant or seed, and who I acquired it from. I engrave this information lightly with my first pass, then do a second pass to engrave everything more forcefully. It takes a little bit of time and hand strength to do this, but not as much of either as you might think.

Here is what one of those labels looks like. Note that I cut off the corners to make them safer to handle.


I place them in my plants in a variety of ways. The most common and easiest is to use a thick piece of aluminum wire. I make a loop at the top for the label to go on and then stick it down into the pot. The wire needs to be long enough to anchor itself down in the pot and of a thick enough gauge not to bend too easily. I always use aluminum wire for my aluminum tags to prevent any galvanic corrosion, which would reduce the lifespan of the tags.


Sometimes, I make small cedar posts for the tags to go on. Cedar is very rot resistant, but it will rot eventually, so this is not the most permanent post material.


Other times, I use other forms of aluminum. This post was made out of an aluminum storm window.


This shows what my plant labels and posts look like after several years of use. This is one of the first of these I made, back in 2020. I was still figuring things out, so it is not the best label. Although I did not photograph the back of the label, after a couple of years, whatever drink advertising that is on the reverse will fade away in the sun and become pretty much unnoticeable.

Jagmanjoe

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
    • USA, Florida, Lakeland, 9A
    • View Profile
Re: tree labeling
« Reply #55 on: August 27, 2023, 06:24:48 AM »
No association, just thought these looked good and thought may would like to know of this new option.

https://signsfortropicals.com/

Thanks for posting the link, Oceanus.  I am the one doing these engraved signs and they are engraved on a marine grade material that has been used in the marine and other industries for over 20 years.  It is also thicker than many, being 1/4" thick material.  While I had been concentrating on the larger staked signs, I have also started engraving smaller oval hanging identification signs that can have one or two holes for attachment purposes.

If anyone from Tropical Fruit Forum is interested in any of my signs, just contact me for special pricing letting me know you are a member of the forum. 

Here are a few pics of the oval signs.








 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk