Author Topic: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?  (Read 6057 times)

Miguel.pt

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Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« on: October 12, 2016, 04:02:49 PM »
Hi folks
 
Here is another rare Psidium sp. that I never saw discussed on TFF before.
Scientific name is Psidium striatulum an is known in Brazil as “Goiaba de folha estreita do Cerrado” that translates to “Narrow leaf Guava from Cerrado”.
 
Back in 2014 I received one small seedling from a rare fruit collector friend and it first fruited for me last year.
This Psidium sp. seems to be very precocious in fruiting… I believe it fruited for me with less than 3 years of age even if it was a litle negleted.
From those few fruits of 2015 I’ve posted some seeds worldwide and I have already one friend reporting first flowers on a less than one year old plant.
 
This year my plant is loaded with fruits… indeed it seems to have more fruits than leaves and the fruits are very good and tasty… just like small “bite-size” guavas, with a much similar taste and smell, and with small seeds that makes this fruit easier to eat when compared to regular guavas IMHO.
 
Here’s some pics to document what I’m saying:

Photo of the distinctive narrow leaves:



Here the leaves side by side with regular guava leaves:



And finally the tree and fruits:







These fruits are red inside:



Fruits are in season now so I will offer these seeds on the trade section of TFF
« Last Edit: October 12, 2016, 04:20:30 PM by Miguel.pt »

Solko

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2016, 04:30:55 PM »
Very nice, I had never heard of this species. The fruits look great.
You keep coming up with these amazing finds. Incredible. Enjoy the harvest!


nelesedulis

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2016, 07:56:08 PM »
Hi Miguel,

I'm growing a seedling in a pot, I'll plant in situ, I believe that it is bigger, I ate the fruit last year and found it very tasty when my tree bear fruit, I intend to make new seedlings and increase planting.

Thank you







Hi folks
 
Here is another rare Psidium sp. that I never saw discussed on TFF before.
Scientific name is Psidium striatulum an is known in Brazil as “Goiaba de folha estreita do Cerrado” that translates to “Narrow leaf Guava from Cerrado”.
 
Back in 2014 I received one small seedling from a rare fruit collector friend and it first fruited for me last year.
This Psidium sp. seems to be very precocious in fruiting… I believe it fruited for me with less than 3 years of age even if it was a litle negleted.
From those few fruits of 2015 I’ve posted some seeds worldwide and I have already one friend reporting first flowers on a less than one year old plant.
 
This year my plant is loaded with fruits… indeed it seems to have more fruits than leaves and the fruits are very good and tasty… just like small “bite-size” guavas, with a much similar taste and smell, and with small seeds that makes this fruit easier to eat when compared to regular guavas IMHO.
 
Here’s some pics to document what I’m saying:

Photo of the distinctive narrow leaves:



Here the leaves side by side with regular guava leaves:



And finally the tree and fruits:







These fruits are red inside:



Fruits are in season now so I will offer these seeds on the trade section of TFF
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Don

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2016, 08:44:38 PM »
Will put a photo up of mine when I get home .

huertasurbanas

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2016, 07:45:28 AM »
Amazing species, thanks Miguel, I wonder if is it even hardier than psidium guajava and if could it be crossed with it.

ScottR

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2016, 11:14:53 AM »
Nice little guava Miguel, thanks for sharing 8)

Luisport

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2016, 11:24:44 AM »
They are very nice guavas! Congratulations Miguel!  ;)

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2016, 04:04:11 PM »
Amazing species, thanks Miguel, I wonder if is it even hardier than psidium guajava and if could it be crossed with it.
============================

i saved info on this  i had found
i never did buy seeds (available on Ebay right now)
becuase it seemed it may be less cold tolerant than P Guayava

=============================

: Although adapted to dry and arid environments as the Savannas, can be easily grown in other regions of the country.

Source: Cerrado regions in the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais.

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=pt&u=http://www.colecionandofrutas.org/psidiumstriatulum.htm&prev=search

========================
region map
http://hasbrouck.asu.edu/neotrop/plantae/taxa/index.php?taxon=Psidium%20striatulum

================

 It is easy to grow and very rustic, adapting to different types of climate and soil. It can be grown from sea level to 1,500m   altitude. Rain rates can vary 900 2,500 mm   annual, with humidity ranging from 45 to 95%. Soils that this species prefers are: cambisols (sandy and rich in organic matter, Planosols (land plains), latosol (red earth and yellow earth) or any land that have the characteristics of being well-drained, deep and well natural fertility and have pH ranging from 5.5 to   6.2.

 It is resistant to the minimum - 4 degrees and 5 or 6 month drought,
waterlogging also supporting a brief period or flooding.

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=pt&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.e-jardim.com%2Fproduto_completo.asp%3FIDProduto%3D300




SH

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2016, 12:29:35 AM »
Its shape reminds me that of Acca sellowiana. I've never seen of Psidiums with elongated shaped fruit, this one is really interesting.

Don

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2016, 07:51:48 AM »






My striatulums from Miguel about 12 months old with first flowers.

Don

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2016, 08:01:23 AM »





nana7b

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2019, 09:12:27 PM »
I was very happy to see the single fruit on my plant ripened. It flowered over last winter in an enclosure but I lost all the blooms.

Finally while outside in the spring it put out 2 flowers one of which bore.

I was surprised by the color of the flesh as the pictures I have seen before were all a light pink. The fruit was juicy and fragrant, however, it was disappointing in the flavor department.
It was only mildly sweet at best with no sub-acidity at all.

I am hoping it will improve with age. I am happy to grow it for the interior color alone.







linsecte

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2023, 03:08:02 AM »
Amazing species, thanks Miguel, I wonder if is it even hardier than psidium guajava and if could it be crossed with it.
i also would like to know, is P. striatulum as frost resistant as P. cattleyana? more or less? ^^

K-Rimes

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2023, 01:47:01 PM »
Amazing species, thanks Miguel, I wonder if is it even hardier than psidium guajava and if could it be crossed with it.
i also would like to know, is P. striatulum as frost resistant as P. cattleyana? more or less? ^^

It is not frost resistant. I lost about 1' of growth this year and didn't go much below 0C. I will protect mine this year. It is about the same frost resistance as guajava (not much).

Daintree

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2023, 08:19:41 PM »
I have grown these for years in my greenhouse, and even sold some seeds here on the forum a few years ago.  I forget where I got the original seeds - I should keep better records!
I love them, and you are right, they fruit quite young.  I have several seedlings goong right now in addition to my mother plant.

Cheers, Carolyn

W.

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2023, 10:18:35 PM »
My Psidium striatulums flowered and fruited this summer for the first time. I probably could have induced fruiting earlier, but I tend not to be as diligent in up-potting plants as I should be. Still, fruiting at three years of age is not too bad considering the shorter growing season I have in north Alabama than in south Florida or their native Brazil. Also, they do not live outside year-round; they only spend Summer (and parts of Spring and Fall) outside since my winter temperatures would certainly kill them.



Their fruits have taken a little while to develop. The above photographs were taken in late August. The fruits had started forming in July. The fruit in the first photograph fully ripened yesterday. The rest are getting close. They spent quite a while small, green, and rock-hard. All told, it was between three to four months from flowering to fruit.



My first fruit was 2.5" long. It did not develop a rich yellow color like some other ripe striatulum fruits I have seen photos of. I think this can be ascribed to the relatively cool late summer and early fall temperatures in my area; I have already had to move my plants indoors, two weeks earlier than usual. Still, the fruit had softened, developed a nice scent, and came right off the plant, so it was ripe. It's flesh did not develop the bright red coloration of nana7b's fruits; it looked like the fruits in Miguel's photos at the beginning of this topic, a nice pink color.

The taste was that of a good guava. It was sweet, though not overtly so. It had very little sourness. There was no bitterness or off-notes or strange aftertaste. The seeds, though still hard, were smaller than in commercial guavas (Psidium guajava) and did not seem to have guava's teeth-breaking quality.

I am quite happy with striatulum fruit and the plant itself. Considering that the fruit of most plants improves with age, I think I will be even happier with them in, say, five years. The plant is also more manageable as a container plant than guajava. My Columbian Red Guava of the same age has not only not produced any fruit, despite being in a much larger pot than my striatulums, but it also requires regular pruning to keep it a manageable size. The only pruning I have done with my two striatulums was on a few branches to give them a better shape. They are much better behaved container plants. Certainly ones that will stay in my collection permanently.

K-Rimes

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2023, 01:26:22 PM »
Quote
I am quite happy with striatulum fruit and the plant itself.

Same here. I also like how compact it is, though it is actually getting really big now that it's in a 25 gallon... But not tall! Just wide. It's a bush type psidium, not a tree like guajava.

snowjunky

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2023, 05:33:31 PM »
My narrow leaf guava gets some morning and afternoon shade and grows straight up, not wide.

elouicious

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2023, 07:36:04 PM »
My Psidium striatulums flowered and fruited this summer for the first time. I probably could have induced fruiting earlier, but I tend not to be as diligent in up-potting plants as I should be. Still, fruiting at three years of age is not too bad considering the shorter growing season I have in north Alabama than in south Florida or their native Brazil. Also, they do not live outside year-round; they only spend Summer (and parts of Spring and Fall) outside since my winter temperatures would certainly kill them.



Their fruits have taken a little while to develop. The above photographs were taken in late August. The fruits had started forming in July. The fruit in the first photograph fully ripened yesterday. The rest are getting close. They spent quite a while small, green, and rock-hard. All told, it was between three to four months from flowering to fruit.



My first fruit was 2.5" long. It did not develop a rich yellow color like some other ripe striatulum fruits I have seen photos of. I think this can be ascribed to the relatively cool late summer and early fall temperatures in my area; I have already had to move my plants indoors, two weeks earlier than usual. Still, the fruit had softened, developed a nice scent, and came right off the plant, so it was ripe. It's flesh did not develop the bright red coloration of nana7b's fruits; it looked like the fruits in Miguel's photos at the beginning of this topic, a nice pink color.

The taste was that of a good guava. It was sweet, though not overtly so. It had very little sourness. There was no bitterness or off-notes or strange aftertaste. The seeds, though still hard, were smaller than in commercial guavas (Psidium guajava) and did not seem to have guava's teeth-breaking quality.

I am quite happy with striatulum fruit and the plant itself. Considering that the fruit of most plants improves with age, I think I will be even happier with them in, say, five years. The plant is also more manageable as a container plant than guajava. My Columbian Red Guava of the same age has not only not produced any fruit, despite being in a much larger pot than my striatulums, but it also requires regular pruning to keep it a manageable size. The only pruning I have done with my two striatulums was on a few branches to give them a better shape. They are much better behaved container plants. Certainly ones that will stay in my collection permanently.

I literally saw this post and thought W. is growing those haha-

Nice write-up! hoping for some fruit on the one here soon

nullzero

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2023, 08:45:26 PM »
Anyone have some seeds for sale or trade of Psidium striatulum I'm looking. I had this species in the past and lost it due to planting in a spot which got flooded for 2 weeks.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

K-Rimes

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2023, 09:22:02 PM »
Anyone have some seeds for sale or trade of Psidium striatulum I'm looking. I had this species in the past and lost it due to planting in a spot which got flooded for 2 weeks.

Give me a couple weeks and I can send some fruit.

nullzero

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #21 on: November 05, 2023, 10:07:50 PM »
Anyone have some seeds for sale or trade of Psidium striatulum I'm looking. I had this species in the past and lost it due to planting in a spot which got flooded for 2 weeks.

Give me a couple weeks and I can send some fruit.

Thanks, just keep in touch with me if there is anything you want to trade.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

snowjunky

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2023, 05:47:01 PM »
Does anyone have seeds or a seedling Narrow Leaf guava that I can buy or trade with?  My 3yr old tree died from rabbit chewing through the dripline  :'(

K-Rimes

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2023, 12:57:46 PM »
Fruits are sizing up and plant is still putting on a lot of vegetative growth for this time of year





snowjunky

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Re: Psidium striatulum... anyone growing this rare Psidium?
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2023, 02:30:15 PM »
Very nice, my plant set some fruits early summer for the first time, but dropped them by late summer.  Maybe it was the record breaking heat.

 

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