Author Topic: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees  (Read 425 times)

TheORKINMan

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Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« on: November 17, 2022, 02:05:04 PM »
So I have a lot of citrus and they love pine bark mulch in the mix I use. I always have extra on hand. I've recently started getting into mangos (M4 and Mallika), an avocado (Wurtz), and the various sapotes (right now have green, Ross, mamey, and a sapodilla nispero). None of them are currently mulched as they are in large nursery pots. Do these trees also like pine bark mulch? Obviously it makes the soil acidic which is my concern here. Thoughts?
« Last Edit: November 17, 2022, 07:47:10 PM by TheORKINMan »

spaugh

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2022, 02:55:16 PM »
Yes, they like.  I used tons of pine mulch over the years on every kind of fruit tree and it definitely is good for trees.  Although it is soft and does not last long.  I think it doesnt really acidify much if any either if you are top dressing it.  The acid thing seems to be way overstated and parroted on the internet.
Brad Spaugh

roblack

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2022, 07:41:45 PM »
Pine bark mulch is mostly what I use. Love it.

EddieF

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2022, 08:21:01 PM »
Careful- i used the natural nuggets from big box store.
Long story short, i raked up all i could & yard is loaded with termites.  Everywhere.
I'll never ever buy them again.  Was used for top dressing all my mango trees.  Disaster.

Ed

roblack

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2022, 09:53:31 PM »
Termites eat plant material. Not pine bark nuggets fault termites are around and are always hungry. Most other mulch is termite fodder as well. If it's not, might not be good for your plants (if toxic to termites). 

Tropheus76

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2022, 10:42:31 AM »
This is Florida, we have more termites than ants. They are a vitally important part of building soil by breaking down fibrous material. They do not touch live wood. If they are not up against your house then it shouldnt be a problem since they spread by flight and its a craps shoot on where they go. Plus if your house is treated then it wont be a problem anyway.

TheORKINMan

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2022, 10:57:12 AM »
Thanks for the advice everyone. I've never seen termites in potted trees before here in N FL.almost always just sugar ants whenever I see them

EddieF

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2022, 11:14:16 AM »
Let us know how it works out.  I loved it at first, low pH & look was nice.
Might've been my fault, i let a few bags sit outside before use for a couple months.
When i dumped them, they were loaded with 1,000's of termites.  Bags i used within a few days of buying, didn't.

Since then, i removed all from new tree planters & added couple inches of sandy yard soil i dug.
Trees are much happier, roots might've been rotting from the pine bark.

Just telling ya'll my experience, best of luck, let us know.

Ed

pagnr

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Re: Pine Bark Mulch and Tropical Fruit Trees
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2022, 03:16:59 PM »
Termites in Australia have been a big problem in invading live grape vines on farms in Inland Australia.
And of course they are responsible for the formation of the hollow in a live Eucalypt  used to make a Yidaki or Didgeridoo.
I haven't heard much about them being a problem with fruit trees in tropical areas, and these are different termite species to above.
On an Sub tropical Avocado farm I worked on, tress were heavily mulched with wood chips as a Phytophora prevention.
The breakdown of the mulch producing beneficial microbes etc.

 

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