Author Topic: Citrus glauca  (Read 1021 times)

Kamado

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Citrus glauca
« on: February 23, 2023, 11:49:40 AM »
I was going my teacher of Citrus grafted.

My teacher have many trees of Citrus glauca.

I donít have look C.glaucaís fruits.

THis year,I hope to look fruits of it!



pagnr

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2023, 06:15:16 AM »
Are these trees at a University or Botanical Garden ?

Ilya11

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2023, 11:02:41 AM »
I always thought that pure glauca is 100% zygotic.
Are these plant some sort of  hybrids? They look amazingly uniform in appearance. 
Best regards,
                       Ilya

caladri

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2023, 11:34:13 AM »
They appear to be grafted trees, don't they?

pagnr

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2023, 01:44:09 PM »
I always thought that pure glauca is 100% zygotic.
Are these plant some sort of  hybrids? They look amazingly uniform in appearance.

With other species, ie Eucalypt, Acacia, Syzygium, etc grown for environmental replanting, the bulk seedlings are highly uniform, more so from one seed tree.
Between seed trees there can be visible differences in the seedlings.
For forestry, some selected seed trees give highly uniform seedlings and reliable final tall straight timber trees.
I would guess most of the above would be zygotic.

Kamado

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2023, 02:32:22 PM »
Are these trees at a University or Botanical Garden ?
No,my business office.

Kamado

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2023, 02:33:25 PM »
They appear to be grafted trees, don't they?
yes.the trees had grafted.

Kamado

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2023, 02:39:13 PM »
I always thought that pure glauca is 100% zygotic.
Are these plant some sort of  hybrids? They look amazingly uniform in appearance.
There is a grafting professional in Japan.They are called "Tsugikishi."(that means "graftmans")
When they graft, they produce surprisingly uniform seedlings in thousands to tens of thousands.

I am currently here to see them.Actually, we were supposed to meet from today, but they had urgent business, so it's tomorrow.
They welcomed me as a disciple.I am learning grafting from them.

I don't know the details.However, I think there are several types of Citrus glauca in Japan.

pagnr

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2023, 08:45:48 PM »
The way of grafting Citrus in Japan, and the tools used are different to the West. ( Kogatana knife ?). Also different tape ?


Epiphyte

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2023, 09:40:35 PM »
I always thought that pure glauca is 100% zygotic.
Are these plant some sort of  hybrids? They look amazingly uniform in appearance.
There is a grafting professional in Japan.They are called "Tsugikishi."(that means "graftmans")
When they graft, they produce surprisingly uniform seedlings in thousands to tens of thousands.

I am currently here to see them.Actually, we were supposed to meet from today, but they had urgent business, so it's tomorrow.
They welcomed me as a disciple.I am learning grafting from them.

I don't know the details.However, I think there are several types of Citrus glauca in Japan.
this sounds like the beginning of an awesome anime...  Kamado:the mightiest disciple

why so many glaucas though?  does japan have any deserts?  i think that the main benefit of glauca would be to develop more drought tolerant varieties of citrus.  is there another benefit?

based on the few threads i've read here it seems like the priority is improving citrus cold tolerance.  i guess more people live in colder areas than drier areas?

bussone

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2023, 10:27:57 PM »
why so many glaucas though?  does japan have any deserts?  i think that the main benefit of glauca would be to develop more drought tolerant varieties of citrus.  is there another benefit?

based on the few threads i've read here it seems like the priority is improving citrus cold tolerance.  i guess more people live in colder areas than drier areas?

The Australian/PNG citrus often show useful disease resistance, too.

pagnr

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2023, 12:54:22 AM »
why so many glaucas though?  does japan have any deserts?  i think that the main benefit of glauca would be to develop more drought tolerant varieties of citrus.  is there another benefit?

based on the few threads i've read here it seems like the priority is improving citrus cold tolerance.  i guess more people live in colder areas than drier areas?

The Australian/PNG citrus often show useful disease resistance, too.

Maybe it is for the ornamental home garden trade, fruit trees are pretty popular in home yards, even one or two. Pot plants are also popular for balconies and courtyards.

Kamado

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2023, 03:39:51 AM »
I always thought that pure glauca is 100% zygotic.
Are these plant some sort of  hybrids? They look amazingly uniform in appearance.
There is a grafting professional in Japan.They are called "Tsugikishi."(that means "graftmans")
When they graft, they produce surprisingly uniform seedlings in thousands to tens of thousands.

I am currently here to see them.Actually, we were supposed to meet from today, but they had urgent business, so it's tomorrow.
They welcomed me as a disciple.I am learning grafting from them.

I don't know the details.However, I think there are several types of Citrus glauca in Japan.
this sounds like the beginning of an awesome anime...  Kamado:the mightiest disciple

why so many glaucas though?  does japan have any deserts?  i think that the main benefit of glauca would be to develop more drought tolerant varieties of citrus.  is there another benefit?

based on the few threads i've read here it seems like the priority is improving citrus cold tolerance.  i guess more people live in colder areas than drier areas?

I am only 4 years apart from the animation Kamado.I want to make an effort to be the strongest like him.

I agree with what other members have mentioned.I think that Japanese appreciate Citrus glauca trees as beautiful.It is also popular among people who want to grow citrus trees in their gardens because it is resistant to disease.

David Kipps

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #13 on: March 07, 2023, 02:45:32 PM »
Does Citrus Glauca require a different soil, or PH, than other citrus?  I have a 4 year old seedling that is only 5 inches tall, when all my other citrus grow very well.  I've wondered since it is native to dessert soils, then maybe it needs something different?

pagnr

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2023, 05:24:39 PM »
I think Citrus glauca grown in a big reverse L shape from Western QLD down to Broken Hill / Menindee near the Victorian NSW border.
Then across South Australia toward the Nullarbor.
Some Australian plants are Phosphorous sensitive, and Citrus are somewhat P sensitive, in that excess can cause Iron deficiency.
The area they grow in is pretty hot, possibly more arid woodland or Chenopod shrubland than desert. It would vary from summer rain in the Nth to winter rain in the south.
Winter temperatures can drop low, but overall they would be pretty mild.
Many Australian Citrus seedlings can be slow growers.
David, does your location get hot enough to match the wild conditions. Maybe a glasshouse etc might help ?

PDXIan

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2023, 06:57:51 PM »
My Glauca has also grown really slowly. I've had it for 3 years, and get less than one foot per year. It's in the same soil mix as much other 200 citrus, and in a greenhouse in Portland, OR. My Coachella grows three times as fast.

Kamado

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2023, 06:49:10 PM »
In japan, Glauca was grafted on Flying Dragon.
I donít know if thatís the reason, but I think it grows relatively fast in Japan.

David Kipps

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2023, 12:29:51 AM »
Pagnr, I'm in North-Central Virginia.  We have hot and humid summers.  Many 90F days.  My small glauca is indoors during our winter, but in a 60F room, so don't expect any growth during winter.  I've been hoping to get enough growth so I can graft onto a Poncirus to see if I get better growth.

Till

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Re: Citrus glauca
« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2023, 02:30:03 PM »
I am impressed, Kamado, how well your C. glauca seems to grow. Mine stand inground in a glashouse but grows very slowly. Last year I had the first flowers but not fruits. So there did not happen very much within three years in terms of growth. Maybe I should regraft it to Flying Dragon. I had some plants that did not grow until I changed the rootstock. C. glauca seems to be the next candidate.

 

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