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Messages - Epicatt2

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit Trees with high ornamental value
« on: November 27, 2022, 11:36:44 AM »
Just to chime in . . .

I find that I'm quite partial to how my Biribá (Rollinia deliciosa aka Annona mucosa) looks, very tropical, as well as my several ilamas (Annona macroprophyllata).  I find them graceful. 

Also my white sapote (Casimiroa edulis) is nice to look at with its palmately compound leaves.  Hoping that mine will give me some fruit soon.

Paul M.
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2
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: 2022 PayPal taxes
« on: November 25, 2022, 08:51:52 PM »
If a hobbyist is selling tropical fruits, fruit or veggie seeds, or fruit trees there is no tax on items considered as foodstuffs for personal consumption. 

I know it's true, at least in Florida, but one may have tp provide an affidavit to verify that what you are buying (or selling) is to be used to produce food for personal consumption.

I'm no expert, but I learned this from the State of Florida department that oversees sales taxes in our State.  They have a detailed document that includes food plants and seeds, showing them as being exempt from sales tax.

This may be useful information for other buyers and sellers in Florida, but of course as mentioned elsewhere in this thread, different States may have different rules.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Grumichama
« on: November 23, 2022, 01:34:39 PM »
Suggest that you plant them together in pairs for better pollination.  It will be less stressful, too, since pulling or cutting them apart will stress or shock the roots.

Once they are old enough to bloom and set fruit you can evaluate the fruit and its flavor and if not so good or not productive you could prune one of the two away from each pair as necessary (or no)t and just leave the better tasting one(s).

That is what I would do in a situation similar to yours.

Paul M.
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4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Abiu seedling tips needed
« on: November 12, 2022, 01:46:50 PM »
I had a similar problem with abiu....  I got six fresh seeds from a member in Bradenton, FL area and planted them upon receipt in a 12-inch community pot.  Four germinated immediately  but two never did. 

The four that germinated grew like gangbusters and eventually I potted them into one gallon pots where they kept growing and soon needed to go into threes.  Then some months later three of them got big enough that they needed to go into five gallons. The fourth one had stopped growing and eventually died.

The three remaining ones grew well in the fives for a few months then just stopped growing when the weather cooled off in November.  After some below forty degree weather two of those stopped growing and dropped some of their leaves.  The last one held its leaves but also did not grow and gradually after the cold months passed and warm weather returned it just sat there losing a leaf now and then.

Now that last one sometimes tries to make a few small leaves but is not growing any more and I cannot figure out if it is still sulking from the past cold weather or there is something else cultural that it is lacking.

Any suggestions would be welcomed.

Paul M.
Tampa - Zone 9b
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5
After reading that kwai muk is apparently cold tolerant enough to survive here in Florida 9b that convinced me to try growing it. 

This species, from the descriptions of the fruit and its flavor that I've read about, sounds clearly underrated.

Paul M.
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6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Your absolute favorite FL fruit tree
« on: November 06, 2022, 04:46:41 PM »
My favorite citrus is the 'Duncan' grapefruit for its taste which makes its seediness a no brainer. 

That is followed by the mandarin, 'Clementine'.  I have a 'Nules Clementine' and it is also really tasty.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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7
Is anyone on the TFF here growing this batwing leafed, yellow flowered passion vine?

My vine grew well all summer and I was hoping to get it to set some fruit because I am curious to taste it since I can find no reports on the flavor of the smallish fruits.  So far no fruit set.

But now the leaves are getting a yellowish cast to them and I'm not sure why exactly.  It may be a deficiency or possibly it wants more fertilizer.  It gets watered regullarly and receives half a day's sun, then shade in the afternoon.

I'm hoping that one of our TTF members maybe can offer me some suggestions for how they are succeeding with this fairly recently discovered species.

Any & all suggestions welcomed....

TIA

Paul M.
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8
Wow Harley, what great-looking seedlings those Quararibea cordata pics you posted show; it's good to see such healthy seedlings of this species! 

But I'm also with 'hammer', though because I had problems growing this species out-of-doors once the weather turned cooler here in Florida zone 9b.  They proved to be cold intolerant for me.

I don't know if this species maybe ranges into any higher elevations in Colombia than Cali, or whether it is strictly a lowland, warmth-loving species.  It might be nice to try this species again if there were some that were sourced from a higher elevation in its habitat, should such an option exist.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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9
I am curious too.  My Geffner has its first significant crop.  Last year it made two tiny fruits that fell off early so I don't really count that. 

Mine did pretty much the same last year, Brian.

Quote
Not sure when to pick them, they don't have far to fall so waiting until they drop is a possibility.  Not sure what typical fruit size is for these, I assumed the current ones I have are still undersized

The one surviving fruit on my 'Gefner' looks to be about the same size as yours in the photo that you posted above, and appears about as spiky, too.

Don't know if mine will get any/much larger before it ripens –if it ripens at all. Some of my tree's leaves are beginnng to yellow and some have dropped but the fruit still looks okay.  I'm guessing the leaf-fall is due to the week of cool overnight temps that we had here in west central Florida about ten days ago.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
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10
As I recall our Gefner blooms mostly in March/April and most of the fruit comes ripe in September/October.

Thanks, Galatians.  I guess that I'd better start keeping an closer eye on it.

Paul M.
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11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pruning/tipping Canistel
« on: October 28, 2022, 01:36:16 AM »
One that I potted two years ago (a 'Trompo') grew slightly taller than yours you described and then branched of its own accord.  It's in a 7 gallon pot and about 6-ft tall and well branched.  It has a nice, balanced shape to it and probably will go into the ground next season.

A second one that I potted into a 3 gallon pot last year is about a meter tall and hasn't branched yet.  But I'm going to leave it alone and expect that it will branch of it own accord like the older one very soon.  This second canistel is an unnamed seedling.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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12
The fruit will lighten up and you will see yellow between the sections

Okay, good...Thanks for the reply  That's like what my sugar apple does when it's fruit is about ready to pick.

Quote
The fruit also softens up but it can seem rock hard in the morning and
be soft the same night

Interesting.  Sounds like it is important to watch for the yellowing between the fruit sections (carpels).

Quote
Most of my annona tree's early fruit don't size up and are not the best tasting.
The second year the fruit should improve.

Form what you say here, this early fruit on my 'Gefner' will stay somewhat small and retain a spiky exterior.

And I guess I should have asked originally what sort of schedule 'Gefner' has for blooming, setting fruit, and ripening (in what month, usually)?

Again TIA,

Paul M.
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13
Gentle TFF Members,

I have one fruit hanging on my 'Gefner' right now in late October.  It had two fruits eariler this season but, sadly, my neighbor broke one off while asking me about it.

The remaining one is approximately 3-inches+ in diameter and I am wondering when it should be ripe.

What is the best way to tell?  I'm unsure what to look for to be able to know since this is the first time this tree has set any fruit.  It's in a 5-gallon pot; does that make any difference?

Any/all suggestions would be appreciated.

TIA

Paul M.
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14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hilo Farmer's Market shopping trip
« on: October 21, 2022, 11:07:16 AM »
...for some reason the picture is being cropped weird for me as well but I can see a corner of the rollinia,

FYI, there's a gray slide bar below the photo & bottom message which you can drag to view the right hand side of the photo.

And yes, that is indeed a nice haul.  I'm still hoping to get to try some biribá (Rollinia) here in Florida before too long.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Growing passion fruit up a tree
« on: October 21, 2022, 01:32:11 AM »
I had a P. edulis v. flavicarpa in a five gallon bail bucket which was placed under a grapefruit tree.  That vine soon managed to latch onto the lower branches of the grapefruit and climb up through the tree's canopy and eventually spread over the whole crown of the grapefruit tree.

I didn't get much fruit off that passion vine since there was only the single vine and P. edulis v. flavicarpa needs a second passion vine nearby to set fruit.

But the main problem was that the vine nearly killed the grapefruit tree by heavily shading the whole top of the tree.  After a year I cut the vine off near the bottom (the stem two feet above the ground was by then very woody and about 1-1/2 inches in diameter) to let the top of the vine die.  It still took the rest of the season for the dead leaves of the vine to fall away.  And it took the grapefruit tree two years before it recovered from having been deprived of sunlight by the passion vine.

So if you are contemplating growing a Passiflora up a tree please choose carefully because the tree many not survive the shading that the vine creates.

Just FWIW . . .

Paul M.
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16
Looks like the haabitat of Sapranthus campechianus is the drier, low elevation area of Quintana Roo. 

If Sapranthus campechianus will even hybridize with Asimina triloba, is questionable in my mind, but if it will it would likely make for an interesting cross.

I cannot find what this newly collected species' fruit tastes like.  Does Raul know?

Cheers!

Paul M.
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17
I would call the company and ask to get an answer that wont puzzle you .The research i did showed these wernt legal in english countries until they re-wrote the trapping laws. Being an avid hunter/trapper what i was reading made sense and sounded like thats more than likely the reason we cant get them. Truly puzzling is the ignorance of your response.

Good suggestion to call the business.

Don't understand though your remark about my 'ignorant response.'  I just don't consider squirrels as food for me, especially the ones found in dense urban areas where they are surely exposed to god-knows-what in the city's environment.  Makes squirrels seem pretty unapetizing to me.

But the squirrels clearly have been devastating my fruit crops, so I'd just as well prefer to be shed of them.  And before there are any moans about it it's not as if I were intending to destroy the entire species; just those in my immediate area.

Paul M.
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18
I would guess since its marketed for squirrels and a kill trap it will be hard to get in the usa possibly some laws broken? Squirrels are game animals in the usa so in every state you would need a license to harvest game. Now that its targeting game this would be sold to trappers in the usa and that doesnt look like it would pass the dec's eye lol just another thing against it . If it were marketed for rats i bet you could prime that thing and have it in 2days!

Frankly I don't conceive of squirrels as game –at least not in Florida and surely not in the middle of a large urban city Llike Tampa.

And as far as I'm concerned squirrels are little more than fluffy rats, anyway.  So since they are essentially vermin, I still don't get why these humane but effctive kill traps for squirrels are not available in the US.

Truly puzzling . . .

Paul M.
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19
I'm having a serious problem with squirrels, and likely rats too, with them ravaging my avocados, mangoes, and other fruit even before they ripen, such that I have not gotten any of my crop for myself these last two seasons.

I have seen how effective the Goodnature A18 squirrel destroyer is, but only their model A24 (mouse & rat traps) are available in the US.  (I know this because I've checked online everywhere I can think of without success.)

Can any of our TFF members explain why this A18 squirrel destroyer is not allowed into the US. It seems like an effective, humane control for these ravaging rodents.

Or maybe someone has found a way of getting the A18 into the US –short of traveling to the UK or Australia and bringing one back in their personal luggage.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
Tampa – Zone 9b
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20
[snip] the squirrels really did a number on my labels in 2021

Just a side note, directpeat...

If you are growing out-of-doors (as most of us are) try using yellow vinyl labels.

The birds and squirrels tend to leave them alone thinking that a yellow label is a
dying leaf –and who wants to put a dying leaf that is likely to mold into your nest.

Using yellow labels on my orchid and fern collection which I grow outside in my
yard has worked well for me for many years, now.  I lose next to no labels.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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21
I’ve seen Pete Kanaris recommend growing them in Florida so I assume they can grow there.  Are you having challenges actually getting the plant to grow or getting them to flower and set fruit?  They grow easily in containers if you are having challenges with soil conditions.

The ones I tried, all unnamed varities, just sat there and never grew much or bloomed, finally up and died.  Yet guavas, citrus, and an avocado, all in the ground, all grow well for me.  So it may just have been the individual feijoas that I got that weren't happy here for whatever reason.

Good to know that there are some NZ cultivars available.  I'll check.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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22
I so far have not had any luck growing feijoa in Florida 9b and cannot figure out why.

Would like to try a cultivar like 'Mammoth' or 'Triumph' mentioned elsewhere in this thread but all I could ever find that was available around here were unnamed seedlings (or clones of same) and they did poorly for me.

Don't know if it's the Florida climate, our sandy soil or what . . .

Thoughts...  Suggestions...  All welcomed.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Greenhouse vanilla growing
« on: October 08, 2022, 12:51:38 PM »
Since vanilla is very tropical, loving heat and humidity to succeed, then growing it in your zone it will require, as your topic suggests, a greenhouse.

The flowers, each of which lasts only one day need to be hand pollinated and there is a trick to that.

The vines won't flower though until they reach the top of what they are climbing on, can climb no higher, and the vine ends 'fall over'.  That triggers flowering if all other conditions are right.

Once the flowers have been pollinated (a daily ritual while the vine is in bloom) it takes a while for the vanilla 'beans' (seed pods) to mature and then they must be carefully processed and allowed fo slowly ferment.  There is information about that whole fermentation process online.

Good luck!

Paul M.
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24

 What better selections are you having success with in FL? I am looking for a variety
that my parents can grow in Wellington.

I am presuming that is Wellington, Florida (and not New Zealand).

Well, maybe how about Parfianka?  It is reported to be good in zones 6 thru 10 and has first quality fruit.

HTH

Paul M.
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25
Tried Ugni twice: Once from a popular Calif. nursery and the second time from a nursery in N. Carolina.

Out of 5 plants I got from Cal. and the 3 from N. Carolina none of them survived very long here in Tampa.

So now I am wondering whether there are any cultivars of Ugni molinć that exhibit any warmth tolerance.  Or if we could get this species to survive here in our hot and wet Florida summers by providing it with shade or maybe by modifying the pH of the soil it likes to grow in, or perhaps it's the type of soil it likes to grow in that's the trick to making it happy.

Any suggestions welcomed!

Paul M.
Tampa — Zone 9b
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