Author Topic: Taro ID Question  (Read 578 times)

TropicalDoc

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Taro ID Question
« on: July 13, 2022, 11:58:18 AM »
I was at the Farm Supply Cooperative in Hilo, and saw a plant labeled “Samoan Taro”. I’m a sucker for new types of tropical vegetables, and Taro especially, so I bought it. 

After I got home and planted it though, I started wondering if this is an edible plant at all. The leaves look more arrow-head shaped. My plant identifier even identified it as Green Arrow Arum (Peltandra Virginica), which it described as a poisonous plant.

Can anyone know knows Taro well look at my pics and see if they recognize it as an edible Taro? Thanks in advance!

Kevin





Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2022, 10:23:27 PM »
That looks like Xanthosoma brasilliensis--it is used for lua (cooked leaves). Maybe ask your source if it is edible. Kew says that it is easy to identify because it is one of the only aeroids with a hastate leaf (had to look that one up).

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:269304-2&ved=2ahUKEwikiJCEqPf4AhWYQzABHaGeATkQFnoECAgQAQ&usg=AOvVaw2QN71KxRldlUsVCX9G7eWf

Pictures of this species on the net seem to be mostly of X. sagitifolium that are copied and pasted. The link below shows what to my non-botanist thinking is the hastate leaf described by Kew.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.tastinghawaii.com/2016/07/tahitian-taro-leaf-for-life.html&ved=2ahUKEwiG04Pap_f4AhXJTjABHQivAAMQr4kDegQIBRAE&usg=AOvVaw3JNiPXnYfy4e1ONm_lHBSS

TropicalDoc

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2022, 11:51:53 AM »
Wow thank you this has been extremely helpful! I had no idea about Xanthosoma taro. I think you’re exactly right though. I’ll thoroughly cook and try a small amount first of course. We will see if the leaves are indeed better tasting than colocasia taro leaves, as has been reported.

Thanks again for this!

Kevin

Francis_Eric

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2022, 11:59:07 AM »
I am interested to know how long to cook these leaves?

Are these containing Calcium oxalate ?

Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2022, 06:31:35 PM »
I am interested to know how long to cook these leaves?

Are these containing Calcium oxalate ?

Yes, they contain Calcium oxalate. I cooked a small amount for 10-12 minutes and it was not "prickly". I think the link I provided recommends 20 minutes.

Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2022, 11:45:59 PM »
Here is an interesting article. Apparently what we grow in Florida as X. sagitifolium is actually a different species X. caracu. The picture of X. brasiliense matches perfectly what you have, however.

pineislander

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2022, 07:54:55 AM »
Here is an interesting article. Apparently what we grow in Florida as X. sagitifolium is actually a different species X. caracu. The picture of X. brasiliense matches perfectly what you have, however.
I don't think this is Xanthosoma caracu. That plant grows 5-6 feet and has a corm.

Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2022, 03:09:51 PM »
Here is an interesting article. Apparently what we grow in Florida as X. sagitifolium is actually a different species X. caracu. The picture of X. brasiliense matches perfectly what you have, however.
I don't think this is Xanthosoma caracu. That plant grows 5-6 feet and has a corm.

I agree. It looks like he has X. Brasiliense. I will post the link (which I forgot to do earlier) and you can read the article. Then my comment will make more sense.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://journals.flvc.org/fshs/article/download/98971/94957&ved=2ahUKEwj-zuuRtrX5AhXWmIQIHZvlDdcQFnoECA0QAQ&usg=AOvVaw1irK0xXL9YWLvDvr_3XGXV

pineislander

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2022, 09:37:19 AM »
If anyone would like to trade for the brasiliense/Belembe type I have a xanthosoma relative from Surinam for trade. It is classically eaten as a lef vegetable there. It doesn't make edible corms but does cook down very nice and tender with no oxalates.
In Surinam they call it Tajerblad/Tayerblad and it's grown on a large commercial scale there. This video is in Surinamese Dutch but you can observe the way it is being grown.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ciq2mcL1FA&t
 

spencerw

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2022, 03:18:00 PM »
Did you fully identify it as x. Brasiliense? I have that plant growing and its actually my favorite leaf vegetable. The plants are very small compared to regular xathosomas. They only get about 2.5 feet tall. They are technically edible raw, but we always cook them 10 minutes. Much better than regular kalo that can take 2 hours to cook. Bun long is much shorter at 30-45 minutes but that belembe really has them beat with cook time. Slugs love them though. They don't last long so keep fertilizing them and separating them and replanting. I plan to write up an article for my website but haven't gotten to it yet

 

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