Author Topic: Growing oranges in FL  (Read 2664 times)

Maria in Brevard

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 36
    • USA, Florida 10A
    • View Profile
Growing oranges in FL
« on: March 31, 2024, 09:15:54 AM »
Morning! I used to think I live in citrus capital of US and citruses are easy here but no.... I love red navel, planted tree several years ago but it just did not grow no matter what I did and looked sick all the time so I removed it. But right next to it I planted pomelo and it does fine, gives me delicious fruits every year. At my old house I had tangerine, too many seeds but it was still OK to eat. This is my (very limited) experience. FL citrus growers, please share your advice and knowledge. Can I grow red navel in Central FL (East Coast) now? I know about greening, btw.

Tropheus76

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 928
    • East Orlando 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2024, 03:54:54 PM »
There are ways to grow citrus in FL. I have had luck growing under oak trees. I still deal with leaf miners but so far aside from the ravages of deer my small grove of various trees including a red naval orange is doing fairly well. Citrus does not like being in full sun with few exceptions, one being a pomelo weirdly enough. All of the rest of my older trees that I planted early on in full sun have either died or are very stunted. I started a couple three years ago partially under an oak tree line and they are already taller, bushier and healthier than ones I planted over ten years ago in full sun.

I also have a couple in pots located on the east side of my house under the eaves so the dew drips on them every morning from the roof. They look great as well since they miss the afternoon sun.

Finally I find some of the oddball varieties do well and are less susceptible to greening. Yuzu lemon, pomelo, and some of the weird ones tend to survive.

Maria in Brevard

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 36
    • USA, Florida 10A
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2024, 05:43:52 PM »
Thank you, Tropheus76. Lots of info. I don't have large trees so no shade. I always thought of citruses as full sun trees. Will be thinking if it's worth it. I think not.

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4830
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2024, 06:32:02 PM »
Citrus trees need a minimum of 6-8 hours of full direct sunlight daily or they will not produce as well. Look at all the citrus groves in every location of the world.  SUN SUN   Will a citrus tree grow in some shade - yes but not as well and will produce much less fruit.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2024, 10:53:31 PM by Millet »

Calusa

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 329
    • St Petersburg, Florida 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2024, 07:10:19 PM »
Citrus trees need a minimum of 6-8 hours of full direct sunlight daily or they will not produce as well. Look at all the citrus groves in every area of the world.  SUN SUN   Will a citrus tree grow in some shade - yes but not as well and will produce much less fruit.


👍👍
« Last Edit: April 03, 2024, 10:52:45 PM by Millet »

1rainman

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
    • Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2024, 07:25:41 PM »
Best bet would be get a dwarf variety or a rooted cutting which also are dwarf. Wrap the whole tree in those nets that protect from greening. If itís a lemon or sour orange or something itís not necessary but I mean if thereís a variety you really like. Then I would periodically spray it with some neem oil or something to be double sure that disease and insects are at a minimum.

FruitGrower

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • South Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2024, 12:20:58 AM »
Best bet would be get a dwarf variety or a rooted cutting which also are dwarf. Wrap the whole tree in those nets that protect from greening. If itís a lemon or sour orange or something itís not necessary but I mean if thereís a variety you really like. Then I would periodically spray it with some neem oil or something to be double sure that disease and insects are at a minimum.

This is what i do and it works well.

Tropheus76

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 928
    • East Orlando 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2024, 07:42:07 AM »
I disagree. I have seen groves mixed in alternate rows with pine trees and the trees look far healthier than open sun and open air trees. My own experience so far mirrors this. They are an understory tree in nature and prefer dappled light. Every grove I see on the regular in full sun looks like hell. Could be they all have greening, but doesnt explain why the partially shaded ones look so much better. Partially shaded doesnt mean they arent getting 6-8 hours of sun, it just means they arent getting the sun full blast from 6am-830pm(during the summer)
« Last Edit: April 04, 2024, 07:51:09 AM by Tropheus76 »

FruitGrower

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • South Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2024, 08:00:26 PM »
I disagree. I have seen groves mixed in alternate rows with pine trees and the trees look far healthier than open sun and open air trees. My own experience so far mirrors this. They are an understory tree in nature and prefer dappled light. Every grove I see on the regular in full sun looks like hell. Could be they all have greening, but doesnt explain why the partially shaded ones look so much better. Partially shaded doesnt mean they arent getting 6-8 hours of sun, it just means they arent getting the sun full blast from 6am-830pm(during the summer)

Another possibility is that the shaded trees are less exposed to being infected by HLB - maybe they donít have it or have a less severe infection. I once read an article about the behavior of the asp, saying that they fly over trees, scanning for new growth, describing their behavior as ďlazyĒ. Before reading this, I kept my netting tightly closed, as I was afraid the asp would find its way in. Since reading this some years ago, Iíve been more relaxed about keeping the nets sealed, I just make sure Iím covering overhead, and I havenít had any signs of infection.

I think if citrus did better under shade, they would have been grown that way commercially prior to HLB. IME the trees that get some shade do grow slower than my full-sun citrus; granted, all my tress get a little shade from the screening but the difference is clear.

Calusa

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 329
    • St Petersburg, Florida 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2024, 12:14:49 AM »
I keep my two small trees under nets with the bottom weighted down with bricks. It's now a year later and they are doing very well.
I'll soon be upgrading from 6' nets to 9' due to the recent flush of new growth. Once they fill those nets out in another year I plan on removing the nets altogether, as long as the brix is in the mid teens or higher. Still trying to figure out exactly how to arrange that.

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4830
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2024, 12:25:40 PM »
Calusa, I'm sorry to think what will happen to your trees after you remove the net.

bussone

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 203
    • Philadelphia, PA (7a)
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2024, 03:21:47 PM »
I disagree. I have seen groves mixed in alternate rows with pine trees and the trees look far healthier than open sun and open air trees. My own experience so far mirrors this. They are an understory tree in nature and prefer dappled light. Every grove I see on the regular in full sun looks like hell. Could be they all have greening, but doesnt explain why the partially shaded ones look so much better. Partially shaded doesnt mean they arent getting 6-8 hours of sun, it just means they arent getting the sun full blast from 6am-830pm(during the summer)

It's conceivable that both are correct.

Mixed rows could yield citrus trees that are more productive in terms of product per tree, but less productive in terms of product per acre, because a non-mixed grove has twice the citrus density. Even if mixed rows yields citrus that are 50% more healthy/productive,  2x1 > 1x1.5.

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4830
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2024, 05:11:27 PM »
I would think growing pine trees in-between citrus rows would:  1.  gobble up a lot of the moisture from the citrus, 2. block out much of the light. 3. Rob a lot of the fertilizer from the citrus.

Calusa

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 329
    • St Petersburg, Florida 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2024, 08:46:46 AM »
It would also do nothing to prevent HLB psyllid infestation which is the worst thing facing Florida's citrus industry .

hardyvermont

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 185
    • Anderson SC z 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2024, 10:59:45 AM »
At the Southeastern Citrus Expo two years ago there was a presentation on this topic.  Citrus do well in the shade, but much less yield.  Also less attractive to psyllid. 


1rainman

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
    • Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2024, 12:02:08 PM »
I keep my two small trees under nets with the bottom weighted down with bricks. It's now a year later and they are doing very well.
I'll soon be upgrading from 6' nets to 9' due to the recent flush of new growth. Once they fill those nets out in another year I plan on removing the nets altogether, as long as the brix is in the mid teens or higher. Still trying to figure out exactly how to arrange that.

If you use a rooted cutting it will seldom get taller than six feet. Ten tops depends on variety. Flying dragon root stock should be similar. You can keep the permanently under a net.

Calusa

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 329
    • St Petersburg, Florida 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing oranges in FL
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2024, 09:08:02 PM »
I just can't stand the thought of keeping nets on citrus trees once they become fruit bearing size. My goal is to follow through with what Dr Thomas Dykstra says about insects not attacking healthy plants. See below.

Those nets will come off in a couple of years for better or worse. Getting the brix in the mid teens or higher is what I will try to achieve in order to set these trees free to Mother Nature and hopefully free from HLM psyllids.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnNOvA3diDU

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk