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Messages - Triphal

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango thief on the loose!
« on: May 12, 2021, 06:57:14 PM »
This guy has a problem of his right hip joint! He may have fallen from his ladder some time back.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dwarf papaya experiment
« on: March 27, 2021, 08:19:28 PM »
This may help. East West Seed Company in Philippines have excellent Dwarf varieties of Papayas.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Artocarpus ID?
« on: February 22, 2021, 05:29:08 PM »
Looks like ? Artocarpus camensi or ? Artocarpus altilis. Triphal

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help in ID this fruit
« on: February 22, 2021, 10:15:50 AM »
I also have one flower look like is one

At least by what I was told supposedly not edible


And the seeds look like is picture and only get a few seeds maybe six or seven per pod
Hopefully somebody might know better though
Last update for now




Malabar chestnut leaves


Seedling malabar chestnut





The leaves are the one that supposed to be not edible are
I think you are confusing with the leaves of another plant Justice adhatoda aka Malabar nut. In the Western South Deccan it is called 'adasoge' and the leaves are used for medicinal purposes of chest ailments. It is grown wild on mud fences and empty land and the leaves are rarely eaten by the cattle as they are very bitter. I have seen hundreds of them with white flowers but never seen those so called 'Malabar nuts' on them!
 Malabar chestnut is a different plant indigenous to Northern part of tropical South America and rarely seen and known in the Indian continent. I was lucky enough to see one plant with those fruits and leaves seen as above and never seen the flowers. Never eaten it and was told it is poisonous to humans! East India Company sent many workers to Guyana plantations from India. Most of them from UP and Bihar Hindi speaking belt and few from Telugu and Tamil speaking workers from the then Madras Presidency.  None from Malabar or Mysore. The name Malabar chestnut probably was mistakenly coined by the Colonial Brits in the 19th century and probably brought to India by one of the Colonials. I do not remember reading about this plant documentation in Dutch Governor Von Rheede's (late 1600s) Hortus Malabaricus pictorial volumes.


http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Justicia+adhatoda
Justicia adhatoda  the whole tree doesn't look similar to the one I have . Justicia adhatoda
Has a simple leaf and flower structure completely different

I got flowers and nuts off of my tree so I know it's a  specie of money tree / pachira

That is exactly what I was saying since this blog ID came up on February 20th. I was the first one to reply this the same day!  Thanks for supporting my view the next day February 21st and after19 hours of my posting. Since I have personally seen both of them and knew these plant's taxonomy and uses for more than 7 decades I was only differentiating the confusing names of the two :MALABAR CHESTNUT  VS MALABAR NUT. Any part of the Malabar Nut aka 'adasoge' is not edible nor consumed but only used in local Ayurvedic and Unani medicine. The confusing so called 'Malabar Chestnut' is a misnomer as the plant was brought by the Colonials probably after the 18th century.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help in ID this fruit
« on: February 21, 2021, 10:59:38 PM »
I also have one flower look like is one

At least by what I was told supposedly not edible


And the seeds look like is picture and only get a few seeds maybe six or seven per pod
Hopefully somebody might know better though
Last update for now




Malabar chestnut leaves


Seedling malabar chestnut





The leaves are the one that supposed to be not edible are
I think you are confusing with the leaves of another plant Justice adhatoda aka Malabar nut. In the Western South Deccan it is called 'adasoge' and the leaves are used for medicinal purposes of chest ailments. It is grown wild on mud fences and empty land and the leaves are rarely eaten by the cattle as they are very bitter. I have seen hundreds of them with white flowers but never seen those so called 'Malabar nuts' on them!
 Malabar chestnut is a different plant indigenous to Northern part of tropical South America and rarely seen and known in the Indian continent. I was lucky enough to see one plant with those fruits and leaves seen as above and never seen the flowers. Never eaten it and was told it is poisonous to humans! East India Company sent many workers to Guyana plantations from India. Most of them from UP and Bihar Hindi speaking belt and few from Telugu and Tamil speaking workers from the then Madras Presidency.  None from Malabar or Mysore. The name Malabar chestnut probably was mistakenly coined by the Colonial Brits in the 19th century and probably brought to India by one of the Colonials. I do not remember reading about this plant documentation in Dutch Governor Von Rheede's (late 1600s) Hortus Malabaricus pictorial volumes.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help in ID this fruit
« on: February 20, 2021, 08:30:13 PM »
 Malabar chestnut ?

7
Worried and feel sorry for our TFF members experiencing this unusual days of freezing in deep South Texas.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: NOAA weather radar bites now
« on: February 15, 2021, 10:50:53 AM »
Accuweather may be helpful for you. They also provide the current RADAR map with future trends. It compiles chart for the whole month with frequent daily editing of future readings.
Watch for some early showers and thunder storms tonight and tomorrow in Palm Beach area.
Please note I have not watched other weather channels.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: what can graft on cherry blossom rootstock?
« on: February 02, 2021, 11:30:53 AM »
am i in the right place? or it needs to move to different area like Unread PostsTemperate Fruit & Orchards.
I believe so. Cherries need  minimum 1000 hrs of chilling.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Should I let this mango fruit
« on: February 02, 2021, 11:27:23 AM »
This is my cotton candy mango tree in Scottsdale,  AZ.  Been in ground 3 full years.  I have not let it bloom, as it was not that large when I purchased it.  Is it large enough to let it fruit this year, or wait?

Your neighbor's sugarcanes are doing well enough to say that you so shouldn't have problem with growing a mango tree.
 Is your tree facing the South East? Did you consider staking it?  Comment above by 'bsbullie' is noteworthy. Good luck.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A good red papaya
« on: January 22, 2021, 07:41:10 PM »
Nearly a decade ago East-West seed co in Philippines released a dwarf red variety called Red Royale F1. But the skin wasn't like this one. Thanks for the picture which says everything. Red + Yellow = Orange. Like those red jackfruits these red papayas are also deep orange with more red in them!

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: coconuts
« on: January 20, 2021, 09:59:20 AM »
Look into coconut mites. They affect young nuts and live under the perianth where the damge appears to begin in your photo. Maybe improve nutritional status and remove all flowers for a while to remove habitat. Check neighboring coconut trees and compare.
Agree. Eriophyid mite (Aceria guerreromis ). That brownish halo at the edge of the perianth an button. Ceamy white mite is so small you need a magnifying lens to see it. The husks develop cuts and cracks. You could ask State's Agricultural Department for solving this problem and remedy in your zone.
Few days ago over the phone I got this information from my 89 years old elder brother who cultivates few hundred coconut trees in his Estate.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: coconuts
« on: January 20, 2021, 09:53:42 AM »
Look into coconut mites. They affect young nuts and live under the perianth where the damge appears to begin in your photo. Maybe improve nutritional status and remove all flowers for a while to remove habitat. Check neighboring coconut trees and compare.
Agree. Eriophyid mite (Aceria guerreromis ). That brownish halo at the edge of the perianth an button. Ceamy white mite is so small you need a magnifying lens to see it. The husks develop cuts and cracks. You could ask State's Agricultural Department for solving this problem and remedy in your zone.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit scam
« on: January 11, 2021, 07:53:02 PM »
 Please read my comment again and see what it really means. Aren't there members in this forum who register by two or more different names? If the answer is "yes" or "I don't know", then my "so what?" has a different meaning and was not meant the way you perceived. So if you still think that I was rude it is my turn to apologize.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit scam
« on: January 10, 2021, 04:37:04 PM »
If you do not want to post the details of the transaction here, please send me a PM.

I prefer to know who these members are so I can delete them.
So what? By now 'that' person may have already duped many or may be innocent. In this forum it is easy for any person to easily enroll a new membership under a new pen name!

 

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help in ID this fruit
« on: January 04, 2021, 09:14:37 PM »
Diospyros melanoxylon? or could be also Bombay ebony / Diospyros montana?  Noted Mike T's comment from Down-Under but it could be an issue with my eyesight!

17
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Walnut leaves compost
« on: December 13, 2020, 09:21:02 AM »
There was some query concerning Walnut leaves compost containing toxin in the Tropical section. Here is my answer.
We have few Black walnut and English walnut trees. We move all fall-leaves from all different trees together and shred it and pile up in 5 different areas and at times use it as needed as mulch for garden (including vegetables) and trees. The toxin in the leaves will be neutralized naturally during the process of composting within 2 months or so. I have been doing this for decades.  Triphal

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Walnut leaves any good for compost ?
« on: December 13, 2020, 09:05:24 AM »
Please move to temperate zone. Thanks.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pickering is way too under-rated!
« on: December 06, 2020, 11:54:14 AM »
No moderators around?

Asleep at the wheel, but so far no personal attacks fortunately.
Probably waiting till the Sun at mid noon is right above the head over the water falls at Dulhunty River, Cape York, Down Under or International airport at Lima Peru, South America! Lets be patient.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nice Jack fruit very showy
« on: December 05, 2020, 03:32:27 PM »
Closer to red but no cigar still. While orange are usually better some of the best are still yellow like J33, J31,J36 and a few others. I wonder if India has quality lines that haven't been circulated yet unlike Malaysia which most people think has the best.
.
India has hundreds of varieties .There must be some good ones amongst them
Due to Covid-19 I was unable to visit ICAR Horticulture center in Karnataka, India this year. They have released two varieties as 'RED'. I commented on this before as they have 'RED' varieties of Jackfruits in India. After viewing Mike T's comment I requested the head of ICAR who sent me few photographs taken by a professional photographer WITHOUT using any filters. I replied that they look deep orange to me. They were from seedlings of Malaysian / Singapore 'RED' variety.
But looking at the 1st video link from member 'Vrindavanath' on Dec 3, I am going to discuss with the ICAR Jackfruit Research Scientist Doctor my doubt about the 'reddish' color in those jackfruits!

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Paw paw
« on: December 03, 2020, 06:10:39 PM »
Please note that Paw Paw belongs to the temperate section of TTF.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nice Jack fruit very showy
« on: December 03, 2020, 05:35:20 PM »
As
If that isn't an amber I will eat my hat.
As Mike T says, there are no known 'red' jackfruits. Period.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New member
« on: November 28, 2020, 06:44:16 PM »
Just West of you London has scores of Tropical exotic fruits available is ethnic stores. South American, West Indies, Southeast Asian, Australian, Central African and South Asian specialty grocery stores sometime carry exotic seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables. Last visit to London Town was 2 years ago. Don't remember the names as a guide drove me to some of those places.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Artocarpus ID
« on: November 24, 2020, 02:32:10 PM »
Looks more like Myristica fragrance (nutmeg) seedling than an Artocarpus.
The OP said that it was outside in 9a temps for a year, so if it was nutmeg, it would have died.
You are right. I missed that part of the scenario being outside in zone 9. Thanks.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Artocarpus ID
« on: November 24, 2020, 02:02:37 PM »
Looks more like Myristica fragrance (nutmeg) seedling than an Artocarpus.

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