Author Topic: Pruning advice for "leggy trees"  (Read 8544 times)

Squam256

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Re: Pruning advice for "leggy trees"
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2016, 06:49:08 PM »
@Squam
I actually meant PC as in Peach Cobbler not Pina Colada. I realize now that PC is not a good abbreviation.

Thanks from the Advice on lemon zest.
Is it usually advisable to keep cultivars of similar ripening times together, or does it not matter?

I haven't found Peach Cobbler to be as vigorous as those either.

As far as grouping them by maturity period is doesn't matter.

skhan

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Re: Pruning advice for "leggy trees"
« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2016, 08:44:46 PM »
I guess I'll start in July. The side facing the street will be VP and the side facing my house will be lz.

bsbullie

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Re: Pruning advice for "leggy trees"
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2016, 07:08:17 AM »
@Squam
I actually meant PC as in Peach Cobbler not Pina Colada. I realize now that PC is not a good abbreviation.

Thanks from the Advice on lemon zest.
Is it usually advisable to keep cultivars of similar ripening times together, or does it not matter?

I have seen some LZs growth habits thst are not that vigorous.   I havd also seen some thst are.  Not sure why this is other th a n possibky pkanting locale and rootstocks,.  In any event, in my opinion, I would not put any of the newer Zill varieties onto VP.  I feel the VP will most certainly overtake and take over any of them.  That is just my 2 cents on the matter...

As for Peach Cobbler, in my yard, and at least one other tree, it is more vigorous than my LZ.  Even my Coconut Cream grows more vigorous than my LZ.

as for pruning any variety too low, as i have said it before,  you need air flow under your mango trees.  This is very important.   Three feet or less just does not lebd well for decent air flow.
- Rob

DimplesLee

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Re: Pruning advice for "leggy trees"
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2016, 07:35:21 AM »
Rob, I have mostly multi-rootstock with the second rootstock connected 1ft above the soil line and the third rootstock grafted  2ft above the original soil line. The topworked crown (budwood topworked into the main rootstock trunk) is about 4 ft above the soil line. I am aiming to trim the current crown and encourage branching 7ft above the soil line because during monsoon season I have observed mud splatter (even when heavily mulched all the way around the treeline) on the leaves and branches 5-6ft from ground level.

Should I go higher than 7 ft before I top new leaders and encourage branching? How many years do I keep pinching flowers before these new branches will be tough enough to bear weight and then I can let the fruit set?

I am not that concerned about keeping it low as I am able to manage wrapping fruits and then harvest with telescopic fruit picker and various attachments thingy all the way to 11, 12 ft without using a ladder - my concern is mainly avoid mud splatter on leaves and fruits (even if they are wrapped) and how long do I let the new wood mature before I risk having them bear weight when they start fruiting?

I have the whole trunk and current branches whitewashed all the way from ground level to the 2nd nodes of current crown's branches to avoid sunburn and will whitewash any new leaders as is the same with all the other trees I have growing at the moment.

The rootstocks are not grafted at the same point/height as I requested that specifically to induce buttress roots - my planting site is a steep hillside facing the sea so encouraging buttressing early on really helps the trees stay upright as given the area's proximity to the water, even a mild storm guarantees Haiyan level winds blowing all over the place.

« Last Edit: February 23, 2016, 07:59:58 AM by DimplesLee »
Diggin in dirt and shifting compost - gardeners crossfit regime :)