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Messages - Galatians522

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1
Thanks, I didn't even consider that myrica cerifera would also be separate male and female trees.

Yes, they have seperate male and female trees, too. Actually, in my experience the male trees far outnumber the female trees in the wild. With less than 25% of the trees being female as a rough guess. I wonder if this is related to the males having higher vigor? That might explain why some rootstocks seem to lag behind the Yangmei grafts. It would be interesting to have the rootstock in Simon's picture sexed to see if the was anything to this theory.

2
Tru, for me the annona seeds grow easily, just throw them in a community pot and wait. The citrus seeds take longer for me.

Here's one of my citrus seeds (pomelo) that I just started growing. Since I have a lot of them, I'm going to decapitate 10 seedlings shown in the photo and we can see if any of them survive. My guess is 0% success.

Anyone else want to guess how many or if any will survive after cutting off the leaf section (1/3 from top end)?





I agree with 0%

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Yangmei (Morella/Myrica rubra) thread
« on: January 27, 2023, 07:49:35 PM »
Simon, I have never seen a Yangmei plant in real life, but I have a female wax myrtle (myrica cerifera) in my back yard. Its flower buds look exactly like what you have in the picture.

Hi Galatians552,

Does this look like the same flower buds on your myrica cerifera?  Unfortunately, I decapitated mine to graft Yangmei on, so won't be able to find out.





No, those look like vegetive buds to me. The female flower buds look almost like a really small, smooth pinecone. I don't have a male tree, so I am not as familiar with those buds.

4
As I understanf it, there are no buds below the cotyledons. I believe that it is possible for a bud to regenerate from callus tissue, however, this takes time and there won't be enough energy in the seedling to support it that long unless it is in tissue culture media.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Yangmei (Morella/Myrica rubra) thread
« on: January 25, 2023, 10:08:32 PM »
Simon, I have never seen a Yangmei plant in real life, but I have a female wax myrtle (myrica cerifera) in my back yard. Its flower buds look exactly like what you have in the picture.

6
I was thinking of R. Parviflorus (not to be confused with R. Parvifolius of Australia). Its native range is mostly west of the Rocky Mtns. but also includes the Great Lakes region according to the great Google. R. Odoratus is a closely related species that has beautiful pinkish purple flowers. It is native to the eastern US including the Great Lakes Region again and ranges as far south as Alabama and Georgia. I think I have only taster the white flowered species. It is indeed thornless.

R. occidentalis is the black raspberry. It is also very good in my opinion and has a depth of flavor that is missing in a lot of the red raspberries.
Makes sense. I realize the black raspberry common name many people just call thimbleberries here. It does have a nice depth kinda like a tropical flavor in a sense. They have thorns.

I did a lot of research on rubus species when I was younger and even had some hybrids that I was working on for Florida. Unfortunately, my wide crosses did not prove fertile and I ran out of spare time to work on it. Maybe some day I'll have the chance to do it again.

7
Congrats! You just picked close to $50 worth of avocados in January!

8
where do you get the cricket frass?

or do you have crickets in a box?

I owned a cricket farm, Acheta domestica is the genus and species of the grey cricket.
I sold 89,000,000 crickets one year
Anyway I am getting the frass from my old farm.

I knew there had to be a reason for your chosen avatar.

9
I hate to be a downer but chances of its survival (without tissue culture techniques) are very slim. The cotlydons are the plant's energy reserve and are also the location of the buds for vegative growth. As the chlorophyll in the stem fades, the sprout will probably starve to death. I supose it doesn't hurt to see what happens, though.

10
I was thinking of R. Parviflorus (not to be confused with R. Parvifolius of Australia). Its native range is mostly west of the Rocky Mtns. but also includes the Great Lakes region according to the great Google. R. Odoratus is a closely related species that has beautiful pinkish purple flowers. It is native to the eastern US including the Great Lakes Region again and ranges as far south as Alabama and Georgia. I think I have only taster the white flowered species. It is indeed thornless.

R. occidentalis is the black raspberry. It is also very good in my opinion and has a depth of flavor that is missing in a lot of the red raspberries.

11
Thimbleberries. Although they hate heat.

Thimbleberries are good. I don't think I'll be growing them in Florida, but I've had them before. They have a nice raspberry flavor. Aren't they mostly thornless, too?

12
Natal Plum. Fully ripe fruit reminds me of cranberry apple sauce.
Must be better selections out there. The ones I had just made my mouth sticky from latex.

The best ones I have tasted were so ripe that they had started to get wrinkly.

13
Natal Plum. Fully ripe fruit reminds me of cranberry apple sauce.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: 10b - best snacking fruits for kids
« on: January 23, 2023, 09:30:03 PM »
Wow, what a great thread! In my experience kids like sugarcane. Its prolific, sweet, and has a long season. They ask for it a lot when they are in my garden. Miracle fruit is also very popular, does well in shade, and is on their eye level. I would plant some even if you have to put them in a raised bed or pot because of alkaline soil. I think its important to include some vegetables, too. Cranberry Leaf Hibiscus (aka False Roselle) has been surprisingly popular with kids (especially when served with miracle fruit) and is a creative way to introduce them to leaf vegetables. Roselle would probably also work and has the advantage of having a "fruit." Sweet "snack peppers" are another good one if she likes tomatoes. Mexican Sour Gherkin makes cute "mini cucumbers" and has very few pest problems. Bok Choy stems make a good substitute for celery in the old "ants on a log" snack and it is fairly easy to grow in Florida. Purple/red mombin is an option for a very productive shade tree that has not been mentioned.

15
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Heritage raspberry zone 9?
« on: January 22, 2023, 09:20:49 PM »
I have grown Heritage raspberry in Florida (zone 9b). They benefit from shade and mulch when it gets hot. They don't live very long (due to disease more than heat I believe) but I could get them to last 2-3 years. I think you will fare better with them since you have dryer weather. Heritage has excellent classic raspberry flavor. There is one that would probably do very well for you called Dorman Red. It has Australian native raspberry in its parentage. The flavor is a little different.

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does this tree have citrus greening?
« on: January 22, 2023, 12:07:57 PM »
I am not saying that these guys are absolutely wrong, but until they support their claims with a double blind study that is published in a peer reviewed scientific journal, it is just their theory. It is also interesting that most of the proponents of the theory are profiting from it in some way.  ???

I think this will erase all your doubts on the subject.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMmSH-628jI

So, I followed the link expecting a scientific study...You have a great sense of humor! ;D

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does this tree have citrus greening?
« on: January 21, 2023, 11:07:06 PM »
Pagnr,

One thing I did see in that research paper was that while there is no support for the brix theory at the moment, there is some evidence that high leaf nitrate levels can increase the level of insect predation.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Safou edible raw? Dacryodes edulis
« on: January 21, 2023, 10:56:38 PM »

Galatians,
Up in Julatten there is one nursery with about 20 of them along the border but I have never seen any fruit on but they grow very well up there at 500m. It can sometimes go below 5C there in winter if I don't remember it wrong. But I think it's more pollination that is an issue.

I get about -2c/-3c on a pretty regular basis.  :-\

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does this tree have citrus greening?
« on: January 21, 2023, 10:51:42 PM »
I researched the brix theory a bit. I found a research paper which stated that there have been no peer reviewed scientific studies done that support this theory. The one study done (not peer reviewed) was done with grapes and showed no difference in insect predation based on leaf brix level.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://organicbc.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/I-101-Brix-Final-Report.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwie3PzNjtr8AhUPRjABHZCkBVgQFnoECBsQAQ&usg=AOvVaw2TjjEyI9hcN3AVdEo6jsr1

Coincidentally, spotted winged drosiphilia predation increases significantly in fruits as brix rises above 10.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/sites/catalog/files/project/pdf/em9263.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiS2LS4lNr8AhUjsDEKHVtIA3g4ChAWegQIChAB&usg=AOvVaw24j_bEsdX8Gk9XmwG5CSJP

I am not saying that these guys are absolutely wrong, but until they support their claims with a double blind study that is published in a peer reviewed scientific journal, it is just their theory. It is also interesting that most of the proponents of the theory are profiting from it in some way.  ???

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does this tree have citrus greening?
« on: January 21, 2023, 10:14:00 PM »
In terms of ordering a box of honeybells or citrus it was always high but like $25 for a box of 15 or 20. Now it's $100. It's outrageous. Same with road side oranges. Used to be cheap as dirt now super high if you can find them. Usually they are passing California oranges off on the side of the road. Maybe $12 wholesale. If you have a good tree you can make some money selling them mail order.

Yes, $12 per 90lb box is the rounded wholesale number for Valencia oranges from USDA Citrus Statistics and represents mostly fruit that went to the processing plant (since only a small portion of FL Valencias go for fresh fruit). I don't remember the wholesale number for Honeybells for sure, but I think it was around $27 (for a 90lb box). That coud be a little off, though, because they lumped them with tangerines this year since production has gone so low. Your numbers point out exactly the disconnect that I am talking about. The grower is getting a wholesale price of $27 for a 90lb box of Tangelos that are being mailed as 9 boxes with ~10 lbs each at $100 a pop or $900. For growing the crop all year, harvesting it, and hauling it to the packing plant, the grower gets 3%. The middle man and retailer get the other 97%.

21
The Microclimate makes a big difference. Here in Highlands County the difference on cold nights can be 10F. The cold air usually arrives from NW. South to East of a large body of water the temperature is the highest. In low outlying areas the temperatures are the lowest. Last January it was 25F in some areas while at the lake it only got down to 35F. The official reading for that day was a low of 27F.

You are spot on. Unfortunately, I don't think the land around thise lakes is any cheaper than SE Florida. For example 1 Acre tracts on Lake Placid are going for $250k right now. Yikes!

22
Yeah I have 3 lychee trees and one of them got it so I chopped it and got rid of it so it won't affect my other trees.

Unfortunately, your other trees probably have it, too. You just haven't noticed it yet.

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does this tree have citrus greening?
« on: January 21, 2023, 09:24:06 AM »
So this guy is saying that if you keep a citrus tree at optimum health and vitality no insects, including the HLB psyllid, will attack it. That a tree with 10-12 brix will not be bothered by insects. Does anyone on here believe it?

Very interesting video and I tend to think a lot of it rings pretty true, especially about the killing of beneficial microbes using sprays and drenches.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB9Cmv1xDVg

Has anyone on here measured a citrus leaf at 12 brix? I have not been in the habit of checking leaf brix, but that would be good number for Valencia fruit and would be higher than Hamlin fruit even before HLB. How does a tree produce a leaf with higher brix than the fruit? I think from my conversations with growers that there is some truth to what he says about soil microbes. A lot of the best growers have been applying compost and that does seem to improve tree health. Ultimately, the real test of whether this works is if the groves managed this way can turn a profit. If the average grove managed with his methods isn't profitable, its not of much use. As I mentiined elsewhere, the real issue facing Florida Citrus growers is an economic one. If growers were getting $24/box like the California industry or even $19/box like in Texas you would not be seeing dead groves everywhere. The average price per box for Florida last year was $12, by the way.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Safou edible raw? Dacryodes edulis
« on: January 20, 2023, 10:06:20 PM »
Thanks for sharing about Safou.

Wow dehydrated Dabai!

I tried the African palm oil fruit for the first time yesterday. It's really good, very flavorful and oily ofcourse.
I never thought it would be this good and I probably had some biased hate towards it for the destruction of forest in SEA. But it not it's fault ofcourse, it's the big oil companies fault. The African oil palm is definitely worth adding to a food forest system.

I agree 100%! I don't think there is any other plant that can produce enough oil to meet the needs of the average family for a year from just one tree. If it were just a bit more hardy, I would be trying to grow it. And, as you say its people who are to blame for the destruction, not the plant.

25
Sugar apple does not live a long time in my experience. <20 years. Cherimoya is suposed to live longer.

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