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Messages - Oolie

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 53
1
Yes, it's poly. I'm growing it out now in a 6x6 treepot. Don't recall how many sprouts it put out.
Sweet tart to me is still the strongest poly out there. As many as 9 sprouts from 1 seed.


Has anyone looked at the seed of P-22?

Looking for a superior poly seeded indochinese flavored mango with very low acid and highly creamy texture.

Excellent news!

2
Deficit watering has worked well for me, I've gotten citrus with soluble solids far in excess of what you can buy in the store. How mature are your trees? I've found 5-7 years is normal for getting good citrus.

I will have to measure with a refractometer. Good store-bought citrus is such a rarity.

3
A good resource would be HarveyC from the fig boards, he sells cuttings if you can get to him before fig pruning season.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Any Ant help plead!
« on: Today at 12:06:44 PM »
When you say in the pots, is there evidence of them farming aphids on roots?

Plants usually decline quickly when this happens and a good method of control is to use a drench containing dilute orange oil and a surfactant. This will suffocate the aphids and provide a mild protection against ants.

Borax is the best solution I've found for argentine ants, but the factory produced bait stations contain far too much to take down colonies, and mostly result in visible dead ants while the colony food supply remains free of boron.

If you can formulate your own, the goal is a 1% w/w solution of boron. If you can keep the solution from getting too concentrated due to drying out, it will be more effective.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fertilizer Recommendation
« on: Today at 11:58:37 AM »
Good luck overwintering, I assume the trees would have to remain in pots or a heated greenhouse to avoid the hard frost.
In the case of containers, you can use heavy water flushes to remove excess chlorine, which guavas are sensitive to. In hot/ dry weeks, the root tips can burn as the soil drys and chloride concentrates. You will see burnt leaf tips without periodic flushing, OR a fertilizer that uses non-chloride anions for the potassium mineral. Usually potassium sulfate is the alternative.

6
Low chill Pears grafted to callery rootstock? Callery is native to some pretty harsh regions. On that theme, I would look at your native plants in the area and think about what might possibly work using them as a rootstock.

I suspect it's all ceanothus and oak, maybe some manzanita thrown in. The typical mountain fire-adapted group. Pears take too much water to fruit well in this region since all the rain typically comes in the winter. Apricots are the better choice due to earlier cropping.

Yes spot on with the oak and occasional manzanita.  Higher rainfall but most of it comes in winter like you said with a nice stretch of dry summer.  I do have a spare burgundy plum I have been growing in a pot maybe I could use that for rootstock up there.

Just remember pest pressures are high with the deer and gophers, exclusion is best if possible, Growingfruit.org has some good posts about 3 dimensional electric fence for deer. Gophers are a real challenge, I've read that feeding atv exhaust into their runs can solve it though.

Good luck.

7
Ant-farmed aphids. Cut back on nitrogen and kill the ants.

8
Low chill Pears grafted to callery rootstock? Callery is native to some pretty harsh regions. On that theme, I would look at your native plants in the area and think about what might possibly work using them as a rootstock.

I suspect it's all ceanothus and oak, maybe some manzanita thrown in. The typical mountain fire-adapted group. Pears take too much water to fruit well in this region since all the rain typically comes in the winter. Apricots are the better choice due to earlier cropping.

9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Regarding citrus rootstocks.
« on: May 14, 2024, 10:54:24 PM »
I find both are common rootstocks in the US, but beware that the Seville (sour orange) has Tristeza susceptibility.

10
Peruvian Apple Cactus, Jelly Palm, Feijoa, Japanese Citrus, pomegranates.

You may be able to get away with very early Apricots (ones that finish fruiting before the dry period).

All of these will be limited by pest pressure like gophers and deer.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Manila Mango at Home Depot
« on: May 09, 2024, 12:52:47 AM »
It's usually July, but you can get them earlier if you need, I would call some nurseries in Fallbrook, they often get their shipments months earlier than HD.

For ST, yes, just grow from seed if you can get some.

12
I find most Satsuma types to be as described.

13
My pears were in Southeast AL, but I brought some scions with me to WA. The Euro ones have yet to fruit, but the Warren is supposed to take some time ~5 years or so to begin fruiting hence the lack of commercial acreage. The Potomac was more than twice as vigorous and is supposed to be more acidic than the Warren. I usually don't allow my trees to fruit until established, at least 3 years of age.

The rootstock should also be blight resistant if you want your trees to be most protected.

14
Make sure your pears are blight resistant. I planted Potomac and Warren for Euro pears and Dasui Li and Shin Li for Asian/Euro Hybrids.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: M4 Leaf Issues ..
« on: April 13, 2024, 12:51:56 AM »
The tips of the roots are burning.
You have options:
Water more frequently
Use more water when watering (to try to flush Chlorine salts out)
Add Gypsum (to lessen the Chlorine burn)
Use fertilizers with less Chlorine (usually it's Potassium Chloride or municipal Chlorine treated water that are causing Chloride build up, Potassium Sulfate is preferred to prevent this issue if available)

Alternatively it can also be caused by overwatering as well, but I usually suspect the above solutions when I see this symptom.

16
Maruusa is an AI chatbot.

White sapotes are very hardy and very fast growers when established, but that can take time. If the tree has fuzzy leaves, they are often less vigorous and can be maintained at a smaller size.

The vigorous ones get really large once established, mine is a subelle seedling and is rather moderate, but I've seen yards with many that get no irrigation at all in dry areas, and those trees are large and vigorous growers.

17
I would 100% stay away from ever smoking meat with any pine lol.

It's a common name, scientifically Aus Pine is a type of oak relative. Oak smoked meat is very tasty.

18
If exchanging for a tree is an option, that seems best.

Mangoes grafted at that size usually don't do to well in socal.

I did end up exchanging it for the only other Ice Cream Mango they had. I can't decide if this one looks any healthier but I'm not making the drive again so hopefully this one survives! What size mango usually does best in SoCal? This one is only 5 gallon so I'm surprised you think it may not do well. Hopefully it being on Manila rootstock rather than Turpentine gives it a better chance.


Both Manila and Turpentine are vigorous enough, the issue is the size at which the tree is grafted, and the vigor of the grafted variety. Ice cream is exceptionally slow growing, and has fungal issues due to PM which make it a very poor choice except for the dryest desert areas. It's normal to wait until the rootstock is growing vigorously in the ground to graft it, usually year 3, but better to wait if you can and feed the tree heavily to induce quick growth so the tree reaches graftable size prior to flowering.

Once the flowering starts you won't see much vertical growth, the trees really slow down due to all the blooming. If you have a greenhouse, or lucky rootstock, or can coax some vegitative growth with fertilizer you may have some success, but I've not had much luck with small grafted mangoes, similar to most on this board (in SoCal, FL is a different game).

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Painter cherilata in San Diego
« on: April 05, 2024, 02:36:47 AM »
Well, selfs are good. The fruit ripen before cherimoyas in summer? Is it a short hang time, or are they hanging past dormancy like an avocado?

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Varieties for CA Central Coast
« on: April 04, 2024, 03:07:31 AM »
PC or O2 as it is also known is a pretty late variety.
The less heat you get, the earlier the variety you select should be. North Indian varieties are somewhat resistant to a lot of the fungal issues you get in cooler areas like PM, but unfortunately they usually are not poly, so they have to be grafted.

I'd just plant a seed from an ataulfo and decide in a few years what to graft it over to.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Some intersting fruits from Viet Nam
« on: April 03, 2024, 01:21:06 PM »

The second is correct Ficus auriculata, a local fig which is edible both unripe and ripe, unripe one often used in salad, ripe one is snack for kids but often have much fig wasp body inside, they do taste sweet with thick honey like texture inside hence the name (Vả Mật).


Looks really good when pollinated, the ones in socal never get pollinated, and they smell great, but are too hard to eat.

Is the unripe one latexy? Do they need pollination to be eaten unripe?

22
If exchanging for a tree is an option, that seems best.

Mangoes grafted at that size usually don't do to well in socal.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Ripped Off?
« on: April 01, 2024, 03:10:07 AM »
Who said they were successfully grafted?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Zill Mango advice for wet tropics Qld
« on: April 01, 2024, 03:09:09 AM »
Taste-wise Aussies will like the Sweet tart, and it's poly.
It's probably not the most productive in the regions that lack a cool winter however, but the fruit are good.

I really like the Parsnip flavored ones like Aussies, but the new Zill ones are mostly Mono like their parent ZINC, which is a really good fruit.

Sweet Tart and Kathy are exceptions, and both are highly acclaimed. Kathy will probably be the one with the most fans when it finally gets there.

25
Seems more like macronutrient deficiency. Nitrogen may help if you want darker growth, but your tree is flowering well, and that's often the downside of adding nitrogen to trees in FL.

I do see what appears to be PM on the blooms, so there may be some spraying you could do to help with that.

For nitrogen you really don't need to apply to foliage, as it's soluble over a wider pH range than are many micronutrients.

I've foliar fed mangoes many times, but it's easy to apply too much. Your seaweed extract is probably fine, and is likely to supply Potassium which is a good thing.

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