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Messages - K-Rimes

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26
Great post, thanks for this. Kind of confirms my thoughts that they don't actively pump nitrogen into the soil, but can be a part of a mulch in place program.

27
Had 2 in the ground, they were doing ok, now both dead. I don't think they liked my soil or water PH, very alkaline.

28
No doubt that annonacin is a well documented neurotoxin and any consumption of those is problematic, no arguments there - just saying a larger sample size, including other risk factors of participants along with some data on general rate of Parkinson's in the population studied would add more value.

30lb of PawPaw doesn't seem difficult in a year. A couple a day for a month or two.




29
Life is short. You may not make it to the ripe old age where Parkinson's may naturally onset anyways. The sample size in most of these studies is small so it is difficult to say the study will have accurate enough results to draw a direct conclusion. I do certainly see enough evidence to say that overconsumption of annonacae may be problematic, but that any reasonable consumption should be fine and thus I will continue to do so when opportunity presents itself.

I hope to be so inundated with annona from my yard one day to have to actively decide to put down the spoon for my health.

30
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Restoring a 30+ year old avocado orchard
« on: October 21, 2022, 11:49:16 AM »
Do you have a small excavator or are you renting one? My neighbor rented a small one a few months back and I was blown away with how quick you could get a job done with it. Having one for a week would probably get done every drainage dream you have.

If you have logs around that you can use to shore up soil that you move, they work for a few years and can be sort of a hugelkultur. I have a really hilly area I planted on and I used oak rounds to hold the soil up.

31
Unfortunately I've seen restingas 12-15 years old and still not fruiting. Not quite Paulista levels of maturity needed, but not a good look! I have a grafted restinga but must not have been from fruiting wood.

32
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Restoring a 30+ year old avocado orchard
« on: October 12, 2022, 11:53:34 AM »
We hear a lot in the news about wells going dry in California.  (They even talk about land subsiding and elevations dropping.  And then there's the Colorado River multi-state water situation.)  What are your long-term concerns about water?  What is the situation in San Diego County?  Brad Spaugh, too, longtime contributor to this forum. I worry about his awesome place.

A lot of rural wells aren't that deep. My well is only 110 feet and it's been productive for 60 years. If you punch a 300'er in you're probably good for another 60 years at least.

Many areas around me, when it rains, people's wells go artesian and they have blast off pipes in the middle of the field just gushing 10' high. It does rain here, and sometime it rains a lot and very quickly. There are these vast areas of massive lettuce fields, almond fields, and so on that use simply massive amounts of water - maybe those won't be around for long - but a reasonable sized home garden with well established trees can hold out quite decently.

Really cool post here to see how well those avos weathered the drought and inspiring piece of property. I could only wish to get one just like it!

33
I have been eating jaboticaba pretty much every day for the last two weeks and have more in the freezer. I enjoy eating them but I'm happy having just one tree.

Agree with this. It was actually quite hard to keep up with the heavy fruiting of my sabara now that it is mature. I was kind of tired of them eventually. Not a lot of reward while eating them because it's low flesh per fruit ratio. Love the flavor and aesthetic though.

I have a big cocktail and some reds fruiting now as well but I don't suspect I'll need more than one of each cultivar by any means.

34
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Did I get skunked on these Papayas?
« on: October 11, 2022, 09:41:18 PM »
Hey Kevin,

Were these trees from the seeds I sent you? If in fact the surviving few are only male please let me know as I’m having another crop coming in soon and we can try again man 👍




-joe

Yes, they're from you. Sad to say I'll tear two of 3 I have out of the ground where they're at, but I have 3 more 5 gallons. I wish they would show their gender before I install them but oh well! I maybe will leave the biggest male, but undecided yet as to if that's necessary

35
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Did I get skunked on these Papayas?
« on: October 11, 2022, 04:17:01 PM »



Planted 3, they’re absolutely flying with 4” trunks. One is For sure female / hermaphrodite but can’t tell if these are actually male?

36
I think this is his old farm address, but maybe phone number is helpful. I traded him some df cuttings for Loquat scions *edit, this was about a year n' a half ago. He was pretty communicative and sent me a schwack of scions.

AKME Gardens
1501 N McKenzie St
Foley, AL  36535
251-233-4441
Sales@akme.co


37
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Growing pawpaw in Southern California
« on: October 11, 2022, 02:12:38 PM »
I'm in 9B as well, Inland Empire area outside of Los Angeles. Can get HOT.

Curious how the pawpaws would do out here. There are some microclimates that I could take advantage of in my planting location. Never seen them or tried one before.

I tried regular random seedlings and wasn't all that impressed but selected varieties are ABSOLUTELY worthy of space in the yard. Totally unique fruit and the leaf and tree structure us really a looker imo. If you're 9b you have the chill hours. I just don't know about heat / humidity. Hopefully Bush2Beach is correct and mine may outgrow their weakness. Only been in ground for 1.5 years so that's probably a consideration - just seems notable that they absolutely shrivelled in the heat and now are leafing back out since it has cooled down.

38
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Growing pawpaw in Southern California
« on: October 10, 2022, 12:27:36 PM »
I live in Chula Vista 3 miles inland just south of San Diego. We get about 70 chill hours. I have 3 grafted varieties in the ground and they are about 10 years old. I water them real good during the flowering time, and then hand pollinate as much as I can. I have one that does not need a pollinator which is the "Sunflower" variety. This year on all 3 of my trees I have about 30 fruit. Some are still on the tree. They need lower pH soil and a lot of water. The lack of chill hours has not been a big issue here. I think anyone can fruit them, just know when to pollinate and water good.

The detail about PH is important. I had many issues with mine as my soil is high alkaline. They totally defoliated and I figured they would all die but I threw a ton of sulphur on them and they are leafing out again right now. Totally wrong time of year, but worth noting. I'll keep the sulphur treatments going from now on.

Nate, mine looked like that before they put it in reverse and totally defoliated. It's fall now so you've "Made it" but I will say they came back beautiful after addressing PH as noted above.

39
Any info on cold tolerance for Orange COTRG? I'm interested, but our desert winters do dip down to slightly above to slightly below freezing at times.

My cherry of the rio grande doesn't blink at 28f-30f. Usually a bit of spring defoliation after a cold winter but no frying of leaves or anything. I think I'm going to leave my orange CORG outside of the greenhouse this winter.

40
Is that down in Laguna, Janet? I have read your posts and seems the Fallbrook is a more recent planting?

My GF's parents bought some Home Depot manila and "standard" mangoes which are both blasting off really close to the coast. I wish they'd planted them in ground but are prolifically producing for being in pots right now.

I would guess it's not just the climate, but also your soil that's slowing them down.

41
Yes, 10% is very conservative...more like 15-20%. Don't forget about those magically shrinking packages. Packaged meat, chips, dips decreasing volume/size of product and inflating with air.


FWIW, Chips are sold by weight, not volume. The bag is filled with nitrogen to preserve freshness. Animal flesh is also sold by weight, generally.

User name checks out with this knowledge.

42
Dang Brad those really took off since I last saw them. Congratulations on the success and looking forward to a review soon

43
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cutting quarantine??
« on: October 07, 2022, 02:05:57 PM »
The only one that I believe has quarantine restrictions is Arizona but I believe that is just related to plants with soil? You're just sending "sticks", could be anything.

44
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Growing pawpaw in Southern California
« on: October 07, 2022, 02:04:15 PM »
The successful commercial grove in not cal is full sun and regularly see’s temps in the 100’s. Soil is deep loam though. You may be having an issue with your soil holding water for the asimina or they are not getting enough irrigation? They produce best in full sun too.
My lows are around 25f-30f and my highs can be 110-115f. I don't think the Bay is nearly as brutal. That heat wave had us over 100f for a week straight with evening lows of 75f so you can see how a temperate tree just couldn't handle the heat. Most temperate trees I have suffered, but paw paws by far the worst.

Depending on where you are in SD County, you may be milder than I am and could do a full sun planting.

They maybe were passing through the nicely irrigated and loamy area I've been able to build up and into sand which stressed them out at just the wrong time or maybe they hit the sandstone? We had some weird well issues where it puked up manganese chunks too so who knows. It did coincide perfectly with the high temps so... Just not sure. Hoping they'll pop off in the next few years!

45
I think the biggest boom was COVID where everyone had tons of time to hang out at home and learn about and install gardens. The sort of collector scene did see a bit of growth, I sold a lot of plants locally off Craigslist, but that has dropped off precipitously. 2008-2012 were the golden years of forum use and it's all on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and so on now - hundreds of posts per day in certain collector groups. Unfortunately not nearly as high quality a group or quality of knowledge on those forums, the dragonfruit FB communities especially drove me insane with the misinformation and I ended up quitting those particular groups.

Due to the precarious nature of people's finances today and how tight belts are going to get, I don't think we'll see a lot of people getting into rare fruit collecting. The return on investment for most gardening is not very good at first.

We should see some conversion of regular gardeners into collectors though so probably a decent boost in of COVID first timers getting deeper but certainly not a kaboom.

46
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Grow bags
« on: October 06, 2022, 05:05:53 PM »
I used to use grow bags, but never will again. They fall apart, the soil gets hydrophobic, watering needs are excessive (2-3x a day for well established plants).

What little growth improvement there is is best applied for tomatoes, peppers, or "annuals" - not permanent fixture plants.

47
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Growing pawpaw in Southern California
« on: October 05, 2022, 07:36:16 PM »
My lows are around 25f-30f and my highs can be 110-115f. I don't think the Bay is nearly as brutal. That heat wave had us over 100f for a week straight with evening lows of 75f so you can see how a temperate tree just couldn't handle the heat. Most temperate trees I have suffered, but paw paws by far the worst.

Depending on where you are in SD County, you may be milder than I am and could do a full sun planting.

48
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Growing pawpaw in Southern California
« on: October 05, 2022, 02:00:41 PM »
I hope mine strengthen up and can put up with the sun / heat. I did lose one of five this year, I should've mentioned.

I have a schwack of seeds from selected varieties and will be going ham with direct seeding this year. Hopefully we get some takes. The issue I will then have is defending them from gophers and deer.

49
What about Jaboticaba? I knew a guy in Indiana who had one for years. A few more that meet the hardiness requirement but might require pruning are Loquat, Pomegranate, Fig, and some of the high quality mulberries.

Jaboticaba are another excellent container species.

50
Sorry to hear that Jabba. What a shame, but you can always rebuild in the future. My sincere condolences.

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