Author Topic: Inga species  (Read 2228 times)

Timbogrow

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2021, 02:57:37 PM »
I hate those weevils! It's those awful ear leaf acacia trees, infested beyond belief! A part me me wants to think the weevil made the plant branch out, like a natural pruning.

Mike T

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #26 on: June 10, 2021, 04:28:34 PM »
DTW nitrogen fixers usually love N applications. Is it just me or do others not appreciate Ingas very much? I have tried quite a few species and find it hard to get worked up about them.

fruitlovers

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #27 on: June 10, 2021, 05:37:30 PM »
DTW nitrogen fixers usually love N applications. Is it just me or do others not appreciate Ingas very much? I have tried quite a few species and find it hard to get worked up about them.
You mean worked up about the quality of the pods, or the trees in general? Here there are some people that bash them as invasive, which i don't think is true, and one person recently claimed they are magnets to rose beetles, which i also don't think is true. I view them as incredible all around useful trees, the pods are just frosting on the cake.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2021, 05:53:48 PM »
iI was meaning the quality of the fruit. The best I have had is I.edulis and the big pod (to 2m) form as it has abundant accessible flesh and attractive yellow still viable seeds mixed with the black. I have heard people make a fuss about how good the fruit are and they have been less appealing to me.


Timbogrow

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2021, 08:47:21 PM »
Yes a nice tree indeed. Like i said the one I had for almost two years that died hardly ever grew in height. Dont know why. But I've experienced that with several others: a royal ponciana which is the same height as it was when i planted it in 2019;  same with a jacaranda. Strange.  What do you fertilize an Ice cream bean tree  with given it's nitrogen properties? Most of my citrus dont grow very much. Must be the overall poor soil. Everybody gets fertilized etc.

What's the soil like there when you dig a deep hole with post hole diggers?

fruitlovers

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #30 on: June 10, 2021, 10:04:23 PM »
iI was meaning the quality of the fruit. The best I have had is I.edulis and the big pod (to 2m) form as it has abundant accessible flesh and attractive yellow still viable seeds mixed with the black. I have heard people make a fuss about how good the fruit are and they have been less appealing to me.
[img]https://i.postimg.cc/qtS5HMjN/aaaaiegian.jpg[/imgwhe]
I. feuillei and I. spectabilis are better than I. edulis, in my opinion. I class this fruit as a kiddie fruit. I like that terminology better than "minor fruit". Although "minor" also suggests young people fruit?  ;) But some adults really do go crazy over it. I remember the author of the book Fruit Hunters, Adam Gollner, when tasting I. feuillei for first time at my place telling me it was one of the best fruits he ever had!
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #31 on: June 10, 2021, 11:37:50 PM »
I am sure I have tried I. feuillei before over here so it might just be me

Timbogrow

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2021, 07:38:04 AM »
I wish I could find a pod to try it but may just have to wait for these to fruit. It would be interesting to what the liquor tastes like also, just need a mechanical way to extract the juice. I was reading that the inga species are used to grow back parts of the Amazon rainforest where the cattle industry has cleared the land.

3rdgrey

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2021, 11:30:45 AM »
The soil here is odd. It varies were you dig. Alot of it seems to be heavy in density. Maybe build up from the initial contruction of the house. But i realy don't  have any sandy areas even far out.

Nyuu

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2021, 01:14:43 PM »
That's a really nice looking tree Nyuu! If you don't mind me asking, what is the soil like there? I have almost pure sand here. I tested it and it's real close to a 7ph. My  well water is at 8 ph in the drip line. I'm  just not using it now with the rains starting. Did you ammendment the soil/sand with anything?
lake placid and Sebring is mostly all sand as well the way he takes care of it I don't know though .
« Last Edit: June 11, 2021, 01:24:31 PM by Nyuu »

Timbogrow

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #35 on: June 12, 2021, 07:38:01 AM »
They seem to like regular feeding of compost. After learning about Terra preta and ancient Amazonian tribes making the soil in places of the rainforest I figured It would be worth a try. Now all the wood I burn in the fire pit I turn into cinder and turn to bio char. I just pile it all up and mix the pile with horse manure and liquid fish fertilizer dumped on it.Seems everything I plant in ground loves to have some mixed in to the native soil. I didn't use it in the beginning so next time I do an inga in the ground I'll have to try adding some. Usually I add about 3 gallons bio char to the native soil.




agroventuresperu

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #36 on: December 24, 2021, 05:30:38 PM »
Im going to buy another. Probably larger then the one I had. I won't have acces to said publication, so it will be sold as a generic "Ice cream bean tree". Correct me if im wrong but are they not fond of water? I dont want to overwater the plant but  it will be placed in a low area subject to standing water at times.

In my experience, here with the species we're growing, I don't think it's a problem. We have some growing very well in a part of our property next to a creek that floods occasionally. If they're constantly flooded it could be a problem, but some of ours might have their roots under water 5 different times throughout the year.

agroventuresperu

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #37 on: December 24, 2021, 05:45:52 PM »
iI was meaning the quality of the fruit. The best I have had is I.edulis and the big pod (to 2m) form as it has abundant accessible flesh and attractive yellow still viable seeds mixed with the black. I have heard people make a fuss about how good the fruit are and they have been less appealing to me.
[img]https://i.postimg.cc/qtS5HMjN/aaaaiegian.jpg[/imgwhe]
I. feuillei and I. spectabilis are better than I. edulis, in my opinion. I class this fruit as a kiddie fruit. I like that terminology better than "minor fruit". Although "minor" also suggests young people fruit?  ;) But some adults really do go crazy over it. I remember the author of the book Fruit Hunters, Adam Gollner, when tasting I. feuillei for first time at my place telling me it was one of the best fruits he ever had!

I'm not sure, which species we have. I think we have I. spectabilis, which is known as Pacay. Those haven't started flowering yet. The other local species we have, has already been abundantly fruiting at two years old. A few specimens actually started fruiting before they were two years old from seed. The pods shown in my recent youtube video, are the local species, that I'm not sure what the scientific name is. They are choice! The pulp is thick and separates easily from the seeds and really does taste like vanilla ice cream. We actually froze them once and made a sorbet, but I like them more when they're fresh.

pineislander

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #38 on: December 24, 2021, 08:10:28 PM »
Here in SW Florida mine seem to grow more vigorously in winter. The best ones were pruned to a single stem it forces some height gain.

Timbogrow

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #39 on: December 24, 2021, 08:48:29 PM »
The spectabalis a year after germination. Photo is about 2 months old but I see what your saying about the pruning giving it some height pineislander. It's branches will be on the ground when it beefs up. Maybe I'll prune some of them to encourage the vertical branches to grow up.


Tortuga

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Re: Inga species
« Reply #40 on: December 26, 2021, 06:56:09 AM »
Im growing I. feuillei variety. From my extensive research and given flavor profiles of similar species, feuillei seems like the real deal in taste and texture compared to edulis and other varieties that either contain only taste or texture but not both as the superior feuillei speciee

 

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