Author Topic: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?  (Read 1442 times)

1rainman

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Re: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2022, 07:51:03 PM »
The hybrids aren't ugli fruit but very similar in appearance. Though ugli fruit is a bit bigger. It's thought to be a complex hybrid. An f1 of grapefruit and tangerine would not be that large. It could also be part pummelo which is bigger than grapefruit. The fruit inside is unusually tangerine like though a small hint of grapefruit. I'd love to grow one.

Around here grapefruits do best in the wild along with sour oranges. Some of the sweet oranges from seed look slightly like ugli fruit though more orange like and somewhat sour or really sour. I think hybrids generally take on that appearance in most cases.

pagnr

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Re: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?
« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2022, 07:15:45 PM »
1rainman, it sounds like you are dealing with a varied population of "wild oranges" of various types.
I have seen some of these groves on a couple of Nature TV shows, and You Tube.

Also always wondered why in The Walking Dead, they were always hunting for expired canned food.
Never seemed to find any apple or Citrus trees in the yard at those abandoned houses they raided for supplies.
I'm sure some trees would hang on for at least some years.

1rainman

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Re: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?
« Reply #27 on: August 11, 2022, 03:50:21 AM »
Citrus from seed are large and healthy trees often not effected by greening or other disease. Grapefruit are huge shade trees from seed. Unfortunately most growing in the woods here have been cut down for development.

In a dooms day scenario 90% of the population dead would free up resources. There would be enough canned food at a Walmart or distribution center to feed people for several months. Since most are dead it would last for years. Along with endless housing and other resources because everyone is dead. That aspect of the show makes no sense. Though citrus doesn't grow in Georgia other than junk cold hearty types. South Florida is too cold for some types like key lime needs to be in the keys. There would be peaches and such.

Citrus grows wild pretty easily as long as it's not too cold.  As do pecans, peaches etc Georgia is mostly pine and oak though. A decent amount of wild blackberries and muscadine grapes in the woods.

Millet

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Re: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2022, 12:18:46 PM »
1rainman. you say mandarins and satsumas, which are the types of citrus Georgia citrus growers grow, are junk types????

1rainman

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Re: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?
« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2022, 07:58:30 PM »
I guess if you are on the coast you can grow citrus in Georgia. I'm south of Tampa and it's too cold for some citrus like Valencia or key lime. With some effort you can do it but they are likely to die. North Florida you basically have navels, tangerines, grapefruit and tangelos. Georgia maybe a grapefruit or a trifoliate in the south. The ones from seed are more cold hardy so maybe grapefruit from seed. I haven't been to coastal Georgia I'm usually up I 75 where there aren't any citrus in Georgia other than maybe right on the Florida line. Sour orange, trifoliate that kind of stuff will grow pretty far up into Georgia though but not worth planting

tedburn

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Re: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?
« Reply #30 on: August 14, 2022, 08:12:04 AM »
Last year I graftet Satsuma miagawa on my ols lemon tree only to try what happens and for colourmix yellow orange. This year the graft showed some flowers and four fruitlets.
Up to now the fruitlets on the lemon are bigger than the fruitlets on mother satsuma miagawa.
Comparison of taste only will be possible in October/November. Optical it seems the mandarins on the lemon are ripening earlier  :), the plant behind the lemon is the satsuma mother plant with smaller and greener fruitlets.




sc4001992

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Re: Mandarins and oranges grafted onto lemon tree, good idea?
« Reply #31 on: August 14, 2022, 11:48:33 AM »
I have a multi-grafted lemon tree which is older (20yrs). I do notice the same thing on the Sumo grafts that is on the lemon tree. It seems to ripen about one month earlier than the same Sumo budwood that is grafted on mandarin tree.

 

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