Author Topic: Taro ID Question  (Read 290 times)

TropicalDoc

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Taro ID Question
« on: July 13, 2022, 11:58:18 AM »
I was at the Farm Supply Cooperative in Hilo, and saw a plant labeled “Samoan Taro”. I’m a sucker for new types of tropical vegetables, and Taro especially, so I bought it. 

After I got home and planted it though, I started wondering if this is an edible plant at all. The leaves look more arrow-head shaped. My plant identifier even identified it as Green Arrow Arum (Peltandra Virginica), which it described as a poisonous plant.

Can anyone know knows Taro well look at my pics and see if they recognize it as an edible Taro? Thanks in advance!

Kevin





Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2022, 10:23:27 PM »
That looks like Xanthosoma brasilliensis--it is used for lua (cooked leaves). Maybe ask your source if it is edible. Kew says that it is easy to identify because it is one of the only aeroids with a hastate leaf (had to look that one up).

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:269304-2&ved=2ahUKEwikiJCEqPf4AhWYQzABHaGeATkQFnoECAgQAQ&usg=AOvVaw2QN71KxRldlUsVCX9G7eWf

Pictures of this species on the net seem to be mostly of X. sagitifolium that are copied and pasted. The link below shows what to my non-botanist thinking is the hastate leaf described by Kew.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.tastinghawaii.com/2016/07/tahitian-taro-leaf-for-life.html&ved=2ahUKEwiG04Pap_f4AhXJTjABHQivAAMQr4kDegQIBRAE&usg=AOvVaw3JNiPXnYfy4e1ONm_lHBSS

TropicalDoc

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2022, 11:51:53 AM »
Wow thank you this has been extremely helpful! I had no idea about Xanthosoma taro. I think you’re exactly right though. I’ll thoroughly cook and try a small amount first of course. We will see if the leaves are indeed better tasting than colocasia taro leaves, as has been reported.

Thanks again for this!

Kevin

Francis_Eric

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2022, 11:59:07 AM »
I am interested to know how long to cook these leaves?

Are these containing Calcium oxalate ?

Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2022, 06:31:35 PM »
I am interested to know how long to cook these leaves?

Are these containing Calcium oxalate ?

Yes, they contain Calcium oxalate. I cooked a small amount for 10-12 minutes and it was not "prickly". I think the link I provided recommends 20 minutes.

Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2022, 11:45:59 PM »
Here is an interesting article. Apparently what we grow in Florida as X. sagitifolium is actually a different species X. caracu. The picture of X. brasiliense matches perfectly what you have, however.

pineislander

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2022, 07:54:55 AM »
Here is an interesting article. Apparently what we grow in Florida as X. sagitifolium is actually a different species X. caracu. The picture of X. brasiliense matches perfectly what you have, however.
I don't think this is Xanthosoma caracu. That plant grows 5-6 feet and has a corm.

Galatians522

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2022, 03:09:51 PM »
Here is an interesting article. Apparently what we grow in Florida as X. sagitifolium is actually a different species X. caracu. The picture of X. brasiliense matches perfectly what you have, however.
I don't think this is Xanthosoma caracu. That plant grows 5-6 feet and has a corm.

I agree. It looks like he has X. Brasiliense. I will post the link (which I forgot to do earlier) and you can read the article. Then my comment will make more sense.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://journals.flvc.org/fshs/article/download/98971/94957&ved=2ahUKEwj-zuuRtrX5AhXWmIQIHZvlDdcQFnoECA0QAQ&usg=AOvVaw1irK0xXL9YWLvDvr_3XGXV

pineislander

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Re: Taro ID Question
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2022, 09:37:19 AM »
If anyone would like to trade for the brasiliense/Belembe type I have a xanthosoma relative from Surinam for trade. It is classically eaten as a lef vegetable there. It doesn't make edible corms but does cook down very nice and tender with no oxalates.
In Surinam they call it Tajerblad/Tayerblad and it's grown on a large commercial scale there. This video is in Surinamese Dutch but you can observe the way it is being grown.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ciq2mcL1FA&t
 

 

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