Author Topic: Meyer Lemon Limb Question  (Read 1709 times)

GregW

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Meyer Lemon Limb Question
« on: January 30, 2016, 05:26:03 PM »
Can anyone look at the photo of my tree. I concerned with a limb that emerged last summer. It was vigorous growing and was growing upwards at an angle that was a little steep for my taste.

Currently I have tie wrapped a piece of 1/4 copper tubing to the limb to shape it downward. I believe this will correct the upward growth.

This limb does not appear to have any flower buds on it and the leaves are larger than the leaves on the other limbs. The other limbs appear to be developing nice flower buds.

My question is, will this limb ever amount to anything? or is it a limb that will never produce fruit?




Thanks in advance

Greg


 


Tom

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Re: Meyer Lemon Limb Question
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2016, 05:38:24 PM »
I think I see two limbs near the bottom of the plant with copper tubing attached. If the lower limbs get fruit on them, and they will , they will end up bending down too much. Then you will need to put some props under the limbs ! The bottom limbs usually have the most fruit. Also see 'low hanging fruit' ! Tom

Tom

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Re: Meyer Lemon Limb Question
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2016, 05:39:47 PM »
Is your last name Wood maybe and you went to Auburn ?

GregW

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Re: Meyer Lemon Limb Question
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2016, 06:08:09 PM »
No, It's Williams

I see you are from Montgomery. have you ever visited Petals From The past near Jemison?

They have a lot of citrus and Dr Arlie Powell is an Auburn Professor Emeritus. I believe his area of expertise is citrus.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 06:17:31 PM by GregW »

GregW

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Re: Meyer Lemon Limb Question
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2016, 06:12:25 PM »
I think I see two limbs near the bottom of the plant with copper tubing attached. If the lower limbs get fruit on them, and they will , they will end up bending down too much. Then you will need to put some props under the limbs ! The bottom limbs usually have the most fruit. Also see 'low hanging fruit' ! Tom

It's the larger limb at the front of the photo that I'm really concerned about.
I seem to recall reading somewhere that extremely vigorous growing limbs don't bear fruit on citrus. It may have been referring to a secondary limb that grows straight up.   

Tom

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Re: Meyer Lemon Limb Question
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2016, 01:11:43 AM »
Petals is excellent. They are about 1/2 way between Montgomery and Birmingham near Jemison. Dr. Powell is a national treasure. He is retired from the extension service. He served in at least four states. He has an excellent knowledge of growing many things especially fruits and yes I think citrus is his favorite. He worked with citrus growers in Florida and Texas. He was also with extension in Tennessee and the last place was Alabama (really Auburn). He is very good with many things. Another speciality of his is pecans. He and his son Jason own Petals From the Past with their wives.

Extremely vigorous limbs are often called juvenile and they don't usually bear fruit. I believe Dr. Powell prunes his citrus a little bit several times a year. Pruning actually makes limbs grow faster so he just nips a little to head them back. With a more drastic cut on main limbs you usually limit the following crop on the juvenile limbs that are vigorous growers. I think you or Dr. Powell might consider trimming back the long limb you mention just a little bit. I need to do some of that too ! I know he likes bottom limbs because they can load up with lots of fruit. He uses forked limbs cut from the forest to prop up his low hanging limbs all the time. They have an awesome green house orangrie on site.  Tom

Millet

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Re: Meyer Lemon Limb Question
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2016, 11:28:12 AM »
The choice of branches to eliminate is based on the concept that any space within the canopy must be covered by only one branch.  It is not wise to let surplus branches occupy the same aerial space.  Anyway, thinning must not deplete any canopy sector.  Suckers (which is probably what your limb is) should only be kept if they occupy free spaces.  After a few years they bear fruit, but all interior suckers must be cut out.  A harmonious citrus tree grows to an almost round shape (globe). Vegetation free canopy spaces must be avoided since they reduce yield.

I have also been to Petals From The Past, and have met Dr. Powell several times at various Citrus Expos.  Dr. Powell is a very entellegent man concerning citrus production. In fact the year that the Expo was held at Petals From The Past I met Tom. - Millet - Millet

 

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