Author Topic: Young mango trees more prone to lose mangoes to wind?  (Read 1685 times)

zands

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Young mango trees more prone to lose mangoes to wind?
« on: April 23, 2012, 10:56:07 AM »
That's my impression with the wind and rain of last weekend. My older trees held onto them better. A very promising PSM tree just has one left. Another young PSM lost its last two. Young Pickering lost. Young Van Dyke suffered. Young NDM#4 held onto fruits. My older Kent Glenn and Hayden held onto fruits better than the young trees

pj1881 (Patrick)

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Re: Young mango trees more prone to lose mangoes to wind?
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2012, 11:00:24 AM »
Maybe the length of the branches allows for more sway?

bsbullie

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Re: Young mango trees more prone to lose mangoes to wind?
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2012, 01:05:23 PM »
My opinion "weak" fruit are most subject to attrition by the elements.  Small trees, claasified as juvieniles, would seem to me to be very susceptible to the fruit being weaker and therefore more prone to derooping fruit from wind, rain, etc.  With that being said, I have seen a lot of small mangoes that have dropped from fully mature trees this spring with all of the wind and quick passing storms we have had.
- Rob

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Re: Young mango trees more prone to lose mangoes to wind?
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2012, 01:34:02 PM »
I haven't done a statistical study but I would say that a smaller tree would have less canopy to protect fruit and so may be subject to greater external weather forces. Also,you have to look at percentage of loss to compare acurately.  It maybe that the smaller tree, with less fruit to start with (all of which are countable and have been meticulously counted by the owner...as compared to a larger tree which it is much more difficult to get an exact count of the fruits....since the owner is much less obsesssive oabout the possibility of getting no fruit that year) appears to have lost more fruit in comparison to larger trees.  In my spare time I am going to do some further analysis of this question to see if there is really any quantifiable difference.

Harry
Harry
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