Author Topic: Look at my mango tree(s)!  (Read 38459 times)

murahilin

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Look at my mango tree(s)!
« on: February 21, 2012, 11:33:51 PM »
Since there are many threads with people posting about their new mango trees I figured they could all be combined into one thread.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 02:17:56 PM by murahilin »

edzone9

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My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2014, 04:24:25 PM »
Hello Gang;

I picked up this baby at Adams Flying Fox, I love this tree !...
Its doing well in a 22'' Pot..

Ed..

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wslau

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Re: My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2014, 05:04:53 PM »
Nice "little" PPK Ed!  What does a large look like?  ;D
Btw...a PPK that size would be at least 350 here in SoCal.
Warren

jbaqai

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Re: My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2014, 05:16:20 PM »
Little ?

I think I need to update my definition of little


Very nice specimen !!!

Congrats

edzone9

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Re: My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2014, 05:21:07 PM »
That thing is over 9ft tall ;)..
I hope it fruits this summer!

Ed..
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val

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Re: My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2014, 05:55:51 PM »
Very nice! I bought a coconut cream from Adam a few weeks ago. I love that nursery.

jbaqai

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Re: My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2014, 06:13:29 PM »
Does he ship to California ?

puglvr1

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Re: My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2014, 07:52:09 PM »
Very nice Ed, that's the biggest "little" tree I've seen,lol...Hope it fruits for you this season  :)

edzone9

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Re: My Little PPK Mango Tree From Flying Fox..
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2014, 08:20:38 PM »
Thanks all, i am very happy with the PPK !..
The reason i have not plant it in the ground, is because we are planning to sell the house & head down South !.

Ed..
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NewGen

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Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2014, 02:21:02 PM »
My shipment will be here tomorrow. I've been preparing for their arrival. I'd like you guys' opinions about their cold hardiness, suitability for container growing, and any other peculiar traits. I'd prefer to have them planted in the ground, if they can take the cold winter months (low 30s) and hot summer (upper 90s to low 100s). If not, they'll live in containers, I can bring them indoor or put them under a patio outside. These extreme temps don't usually occur for too many consecutive days. They're all listed as "3-gallon size". Is it OK if I put them in 5-7 gallon containers? Photos will be posted when they get here.
Thanks,

Bombay
Coc (Cat?)
Carrie
Coconut Cream
Irwin
Nam Doc Mai
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 02:23:12 PM by NewGen »

puglvr1

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2014, 02:55:56 PM »
Congrats Newgen!! I don't have any of the varieties you ordered so I won't be able to help you with those specifically. but,  in my experience newly planted inground mangoes cannot take low 30's for extended periods of time. Mine have survived those temps but in very short durations when newly planted ( about 2-3 hours) and that's when I've covered them with frost cloth or blankets...once my trees were about 4 years old they seem to handle the low 30's much better again in short durations with just minor damage or sometimes no visible damage at all...but they're newly planted or less than 3 years old its best to protect them when temps are expected to be below 32 degrees till they get more established and mature...

Good luck with your new trees  8)

michsu

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2014, 02:58:44 PM »
I'm growing some mangos too in Southern California.. but like all my other trees, if they can last one winter here (without much support), then they should have no problem..  ;D almost all of them that have at least survived one winter are alive.. even the tropical plants too like abiu..

mangomaniac2

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2014, 03:16:35 PM »
All of your 3 gal container mangos will need to remain in containers for several years since they are only 3 gal plants. The more woody and thick a mango tree is the more likely to handle temps closer to 30. New or green growth is not hardened and much more likely to get damaged by temps under 35. I would not plant a mango less than 2" caliper tree or at least 15 gal root ball size into the ground. You will enjoy the convenience of moving around when you need to so little 3 gallon trees are super easy to deal with during winter. I have found mango enjoys as much heat as it can get, so even though 100 sounds hot to you, mango is just getting warmed up and feeling at home. This is why you want to keep the pot smaller and only a few inches larger than the rootball so they dry out quicker as damp soil means colder, and they like it warm. Lastly make sure your soil is very quick draining. Mango trees are pretty forgiving if you have a course soil mix, but if you have fine mix they can turn problematic rather quickly and much more difficult to correct.

ClayMango

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2014, 03:26:50 PM »
Leave them potted! Do not plant them what so ever! They need to Recover from shipping and be placed in Partial Shade, morning sun at the most.

I upsized all my 11 mango trees.. 3g's to a 5g sized pot, 7g's to a 12g sized pot. After 3 weeks morning Sun, afternooon shade, They are now in full Sun and all flushing minus LZ, Nam Doc Mai, and Malika which are now breaking bud..... Coconut Cream has literally blew my mind with its tremendous growth... It started out as Skimpy long stalk with a few leaves...now has 3 different flushes growing on it...I can count at least 12 or more healthy baby leaves shooting out of the center stalk alone gaining a good few inches of growth...My Carrie is flushing on all its branches with multiple Flushes on some single branches. My Pickering which is supposed to be a slow grower I think is also pushing 3 flushes on the 3 top center branches!!!

All my Mangos are in a extreemly rich soil called Happy Frog by Fox Farms....The soil is extreemly expensive, but "you cant put a price on love"! I have fertilized once with a light fert of Dynagro 7-9-5 liquid grow used exclusively by the Master Gardeners from University of Florida.

My friend Gary gets Heat Extremes of over 110 degrees in the desert and he has had Winter Lows of 27 degrees which his trees survived with little Frost damage if any with mild protection...
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ClayMango

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2014, 03:32:56 PM »
I'm going to go out on a Limb here and say disregard the comment posted above... I think you will definately want to keep your soil a little wet on the day of expected Frost...This will give your tree more of chance to survive as stated by The University of Ca. Not only does it give your tree the Hydration it needs from the Dry cool winds that harm the trre during Frost, it also takes in some the Energy from the Sun and retains some of the temperture at night, acting as an additional Heat source just like a south Facing wall.
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mangomaniac2

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2014, 03:45:25 PM »
One other idea pertaining to watering and directly related to heat. I have found the daytime highs are not as important to pay attention to as the lows when it comes to watering schedule. Watering frequency is very tricky during spring and fall, and is the when many people over or under water, causing stress to the tree. When daily low temp is 55 or below Mango prefers to be much more dry soil, to keep warmer. Daily low temps of between 55 and 75 means damp is more acceptable the warmer it is. Daily lows above 80 they do not mind being wet much of the time.
Just thought I would share what I have learned the hard way to that your plants stay alive and healthy. 

mangomaniac2

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2014, 03:50:38 PM »
I disagree about watering before expected frost. With 3 gal tree you will certainly kill it by watering when it's that cold. If it survives you will likely have to deal with fungus disease after that, and twig die back.  I assume frost will not be a concern since you will make sure to protect the tree from cold temps.

ClayMango

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2014, 04:00:05 PM »
I disagree about watering before expected frost. With 3 gal tree you will certainly kill it by watering when it's that cold. If it survives you will likely have to deal with fungus disease after that, and twig die back.  I assume frost will not be a concern since you will make sure to protect the tree from cold temps.

The Master Gardeners seem to agree on watering your inground plants before the night of Expected Frost...I have even found a link saying to water your potted plants as well from an outside source.   http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2013/11/should_citrus_fruit_be_strippe.html
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ClayMango

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2014, 04:04:37 PM »
I disagree about watering before expected frost. With 3 gal tree you will certainly kill it by watering when it's that cold. If it survives you will likely have to deal with fungus disease after that, and twig die back.  I assume frost will not be a concern since you will make sure to protect the tree from cold temps.

Cornell University says to iirigate your trees the night before, that moist soil holds up to 4 times as much heat as dry soil keeping temps around 5 degrees higher.
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NewGen

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2014, 04:04:48 PM »
Great, thanks for all the advice. I'll take note and be vigilant about their behavior. I'll keep them all in containers for the time being.

mangomaniac2

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2014, 04:47:40 PM »
If your watering the night before a frost to rely on keeping small mango tree alive through freezing temps, you might as well give up now and save yourself the trouble.
I am referring to container culture which is very different from in ground.

ClayMango

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2014, 05:37:21 PM »
Watering your plants the night before will most likely not be the life saving protection....but I believe it will help in minimizing damage of Light Frost...


Heavy Frost, 24- 28 degrees- Moving plants indoors, green houses, big fat non LED christmas lights, frost cover, space heaters, south side wall Coverage is your best bet for those temps....Then again I havent had my first Winter here yet..so we will be braving it out together figuring out what works the best.
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mangomaniac2

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2014, 05:52:22 PM »
Unfortunately unless you have a mango tree with some nice thick wood, you can never be too cautious when it comes to temperatures, especially the 3 and 7 gal size mango trees. The small ones are not forgiving in that if they get overexposed to cold or watered too much during cold temps they die quickly. Anything under 38 degrees is stress to small ones.
I have been through a few winters now and learned these lessons the hard way. Now I have over 30 varieties and have not lost one for a couple years now.

ClayMango

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2014, 05:55:43 PM »
Unfortunately unless you have a mango tree with some nice thick wood, you can never be too cautious when it comes to temperatures, especially the 3 and 7 gal size mango trees. The small ones are not forgiving in that if they get overexposed to cold or watered too much during cold temps they die quickly. Anything under 38 degrees is stress to small ones.
I have been through a few winters now and learned these lessons the hard way. Now I have over 30 varieties and have not lost one for a couple years now.

whats the coldest temps that your trees have been exposed too? and what forms of protection do you use if you dont mind me asking...I'm already getting nervous about this upcoming winter lol
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mangomaniac2

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Re: Mango trees from Top Tropical.
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2014, 07:13:05 PM »
I purchased an inexpensive greenhouse made by king canopy, and went down to lowes and bought a delonghi rotating heater which has an antifreeze setting of 45 degrees. This is good for all my 7 gal and 3 gal ones. My larger 25 gallon ones I put pvc frame around, cover with bubble wrap, and use christmas lights and a heat lamp during cold spells. Remove the bubble wrap once the cold spell passes of course. I cover anytime lows are expected to be in the upper 30's or below. The plants in the greenhouse only need water about once a month due to high humidity inside during night times from condensation buildup, and then it's only slow drips to water.
I choose to only let the mango trees be exposed to temps down to around 38. That is when I notice the heater start really kicking in. Once my 25 gallon trees outgrow the pots in a couple years I plan on putting them in ground which will shorten them to be easier to cover with pvc/bubblewrap again. I don't really ever plan to let mother nature determine if I am going to make it through the winter. Mango is just way too good of fruit and the trees are just too valuable here on the west side of the country.
One thing to keep in mind....there are multiple experts and videos in florida telling you when you plant mango to only water until established, and then leave it alone and do not ever water unless severe drought. There is an expert horticulturist here in phoenix that has been growing mango for over 20 years, and he writes in his blog that he waters the established ones twice a year. In Phoenix!
Water is the cause of most mango deaths, not temperature.