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marcotting vs rooting question

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brian:
I had never attempted air-layering / marcotting before, but I have done cleft grafting and rooting many times.  I was reading about marcotting and watching some videos and it seems odd to me that the leaves on the selected branch are left on.  I always remove all or nearly all leaves when rooting of grafting to keep them from drying out. 

After the bark (w/ phloem) is removed, isn't marcotting functionally the same as rooting?  Or is the wood (xylem) still transporting water into the branch and is this the reason marcotting is superior to cutting the limb off entirely and rooting it? 

I just attempted this on my ice cream bean tree and I must admit I feel like the girdled branch is going to just wilt completely by tomorrow because these things are so thirsty.  I can't imagine it is uptaking any significant amount of moisture from the peat bag/wrapping.

Sorry if this seems like such a basic question but I found a million guides on grafting but none went into any detail about *why* it is done this way.

Rauf:
It's interesting for me too. It seems wood still is transporting  the water.

Galatians522:
The girdling does several things as I understand it. For one thing, girdling stresses the branch and helps to induce changes in plant hormones that contribute to the formation of root primordia. As you mentioned, the xylem is still bringing water to the leaves. This keeps the branch hydrated. However, with the cambium gone the sugars from the leaves are not able to get down to the roots. Those extra sugars provide energy for the branch to make roots. More leaves means more sugars and better rooting. As a result, you actually want maximum leaf levels and sun exposure. Do not remove any leaves or shade the air layer. In my experience, most things that propagate from cuttings will also air layer, but I believe there are exceptions to this.

elouicious:

--- Quote from: Galatians522 on February 21, 2024, 11:02:15 PM ---The girdling does several things as I understand it. For one thing, girdling stresses the branch and helps to induce changes in plant hormones that contribute to the formation of root primordia. As you mentioned, the xylem is still bringing water to the leaves. This keeps the branch hydrated. However, with the cambium gone the sugars from the leaves are not able to get down to the roots. Those extra sugars provide energy for the branch to make roots. More leaves means more sugars and better rooting. As a result, you actually want maximum leaf levels and sun exposure. Do not remove any leaves or shade the air layer. In my experience, most things that propagate from cuttings will also air layer, but I believe there are exceptions to this.

--- End quote ---

excellent answer

Finca La Isla:
That is a very good answer except for the last point. Any cutting that can be rooted can be air layered. But not necessarily the other way around.
We commercially layer rambutan, for example. We must get 90% or better. Wed never get that with cuttings if any at all.
Peter

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