Author Topic: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection  (Read 37763 times)

Caesar

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 454
    • PR
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #100 on: December 21, 2019, 02:19:51 PM »
I harvested the first plant (out of 5, 4 to go) of Dioscorea esculenta, which I had received from Chandramohan. The verdict... It was great! Tender, quick to cook, mild and starchy. The skin is thin, but inedible and bitter (I tried it); if you cook the tiny ones in the skin, they're easier to pop out with your fingers than if you tried to peel them. Yields were small Ė no fertilizer, infrequent watering, 2 gallon pots. I expect yields to be much better when given actual decent care.

I ate the first plant's worth of tubers. From the remainder, I'll save some seed tubers for myself and for anyone else interested. The other plants haven't died back yet, but when they do, I'll be leaving them in the ground until it's time to plant or ship (and shipped in media, as I received them). I had left this first batch of tubers exposed for a few days, and they turned a bit ugly outside Ė though they were still nice and tasty inside.

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #101 on: January 15, 2021, 07:08:37 PM »
I had a good enough harvest from the Dioscorea bulbifera from Caesar to show and even eat. I picked bulbils and dug out  tubers to relocate them this spring. They were strong growers and began to overtak some young mango trees planted close by. In the photo the round ones are bulbils and the tubers with roots were the "mother" vines. Disregard the one in upper right that was an aexceptional D. alata bulbil which touched the ground and rooted in to become very large.
The two largest mothers were 2 years in ground, the smaller ones were one year. So, by about the second year you can get substantial large bulbils from these.



The flesh is yellow and not so slippery as most yams. I fried some and the taste was excellent, very neutral flavor with nothing off-putting, equal to potato. The batch pictured I left the skin on but it was too tough to chew, however it pulled off easily with no waste.




shot

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 980
    • usa fl bokeelia 10
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #102 on: January 18, 2021, 09:50:42 AM »
That last pic looks mighty tasty!

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #103 on: January 18, 2021, 11:14:06 PM »
One thing about these is they are good eating and the outward appearance is pretty regular, smooth and not gnarly bumpy or covered with roots. Plus they do taste very good!

Chandramohan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 817
    • India, Kerala, Wynad
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #104 on: November 27, 2021, 10:53:16 PM »
I harvested this Air potato two days back, it weighed a whopping 3.1lbs.


Chandramohan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 817
    • India, Kerala, Wynad
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #105 on: November 27, 2021, 11:34:48 PM »
About 3 months back I found this Yam growing on a tree in my farm. It looks as if I had planted the tuber two or three years back and had not noticed the vine.



The vine is different in that, it has 6 ridges and not 4 as compared to other Dioscoreas I have, and there are small thorns in the ridges.
Last week when I checked on the vine it had dried up and the seed tubers were falling down. So yesterday I decided to dig up the tuber. Initially the tuber appeared the thickness of a thumb but as I went deeper it became thicker, but it is so tender that the slightest pressure on the soil would break the tuber, as you will see from the no. of pieces! Finally after a depth of about two and a half feet, the tuber had grown into the root of the tree and I had to abandon my attempt.

After boiling the tuber, when I tasted it I got a surprise! It is the tastiest Yam I have eaten! It is very creamy and unbelievably 'White' !!


pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #106 on: November 29, 2021, 08:02:07 PM »
I harvested this Air potato two days back, it weighed a whopping 3.1lbs.

That is fantastic. How long has the mother root been in the ground?

I got the same bulbifera from Caesar and they have grown very well. I moved mine this past year and it slowed down the production. I hope to have some larger like yours some day.

Chandramohan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 817
    • India, Kerala, Wynad
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #107 on: November 30, 2021, 12:47:22 AM »
pineislander
[/quote]
That is fantastic. How long has the mother root been in the ground?

I got the same bulbifera from Caesar and they have grown very well. I moved mine this past year and it slowed down the production. I hope to have some larger like yours some day.
[/quote]
The mother root has been in the ground two years. Every three years I dig up the mother root to boil and eat, as it is tastier than the arial tuber. I plant a new one in its place.

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #108 on: December 21, 2021, 09:02:40 PM »
My bulbifera harvest for the year. These were up in trees and a strong storm brought them down today. Next season all will be given a permanent home on a 100 ft long fence.



Stomata

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
    • Sarasota Florida. 9b
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #109 on: December 29, 2021, 08:21:17 AM »
Anyone have any yams they want to trade? I have a fee types of bulbifera: Hawaii and Mexico. As well as a few alata cultivars: Emperor(i think was the name)) purple, another purple, yellow and white fleshed alatas.
 

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #110 on: January 04, 2022, 08:38:41 AM »
I am interested. Please send PM.

Chandramohan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 817
    • India, Kerala, Wynad
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #111 on: January 30, 2022, 04:40:54 AM »
This bulbifera tuber I had dug up yesterday and it weighed 4.756 kgs or  about 10.5 lbs. After boiling, it was soft but not mushy and slightly sweet! Much better than the arial tuber.



« Last Edit: February 01, 2022, 03:29:57 AM by Chandramohan »

Chandramohan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 817
    • India, Kerala, Wynad
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #112 on: February 09, 2022, 08:29:06 AM »
I dug up these Dioscorea esculenta tubers today. Tubers from this vine is what Caesar has.


nullroar

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 58
    • 7b
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #113 on: April 04, 2022, 01:02:26 PM »
 God I wish there were more folks involved in cultivating and selling the edible bulbiferas. It's an extraordinary producer and I'd love to get my hands on some.

Pokeweed

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 347
    • Houston TX
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #114 on: April 05, 2022, 07:56:23 AM »
The last couple of years I have propagated a bunch of dioscorea with varying soccess. The alatas went crazy. A few other types did o.k. About January when the vines had all dried out and some bulbous started dropping I carefully collected the bulbils and brought them into the house. Early March I put them in pots and back outside. Then the critter raids started. Everything got mixed up and no labels were left in place. Guess I'm going to have some now unidentified dioscorea....

Pokeweed

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 347
    • Houston TX
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #115 on: April 05, 2022, 08:00:11 AM »
Hey Nullroar, If there is an Asian near in your vicinity you can get a bunch of dioscorea there. And other tubers you can propagate. Check Cesar's list on the first page. Some of these are temperate. Have fun! D

Caesar

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 454
    • PR
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #116 on: December 27, 2022, 08:03:11 PM »
I had a good enough harvest from the Dioscorea bulbifera from Caesar to show and even eat. I picked bulbils and dug out  tubers to relocate them this spring. They were strong growers and began to overtak some young mango trees planted close by.

The flesh is yellow and not so slippery as most yams. I fried some and the taste was excellent, very neutral flavor with nothing off-putting, equal to potato. The batch pictured I left the skin on but it was too tough to chew, however it pulled off easily with no waste.
One thing about these is they are good eating and the outward appearance is pretty regular, smooth and not gnarly bumpy or covered with roots. Plus they do taste very good!

I am so glad that they fared well for you! I was beginning to worry that the beetles would impact your harvest too much to make them worthwhile.

The cooking description is well appreciated as well, and Iím glad you liked them. I sometimes worry (despite feeling that I oversell their productive qualities) that I undersell them in terms of flavor... condemnation by faint praise, you could say. But while itís true that Iíve had better yams in terms of flavor, I really do enjoy the air potatoes, and Iíve nothing negative to say about them when eaten fresh (Iíve only felt distasteful bitterness from air potatoes left sitting for a long time).


I harvested this Air potato two days back, it weighed a whopping 3.1lbs.


Thatís an aerial bulbil? Itís huge! How old was the root that produced it?


About 3 months back I found this Yam growing on a tree in my farm. It looks as if I had planted the tuber two or three years back and had not noticed the vine.



The vine is different in that, it has 6 ridges and not 4 as compared to other Dioscoreas I have, and there are small thorns in the ridges.
Last week when I checked on the vine it had dried up and the seed tubers were falling down. So yesterday I decided to dig up the tuber. Initially the tuber appeared the thickness of a thumb but as I went deeper it became thicker, but it is so tender that the slightest pressure on the soil would break the tuber, as you will see from the no. of pieces! Finally after a depth of about two and a half feet, the tuber had grown into the root of the tree and I had to abandon my attempt.

After boiling the tuber, when I tasted it I got a surprise! It is the tastiest Yam I have eaten! It is very creamy and unbelievably 'White' !!

Six ridges and thorns are within the range described for the species, but Iíve never seen it myself. The vine is very likely to grow back from the portion remaining in the soil.

Alatas are often some of the best yams out there. Rarely have I had any bitter ones, the worst ones Iíve had were fibrous, but those were few and far between. Iím partial to rotundata myself, but thatís because I mash them, so it doesnít matter that theyíre hard and dense. Alatas are generally soft, they practically melt in your mouth, and can fall apart and dissolve with long cooking, no mashing required (unless you prefer it). At least, thatís been my experience with the varieties Iíve had here.


The mother root has been in the ground two years. Every three years I dig up the mother root to boil and eat, as it is tastier than the arial tuber. I plant a new one in its place.

Have any roots older than that remained in the ground? Have you noticed a difference in quality, size and production with older vines?

Anyone have any yams they want to trade? I have a fee types of bulbifera: Hawaii and Mexico. As well as a few alata cultivars: Emperor(i think was the name)) purple, another purple, yellow and white fleshed alatas.

PM sent! Iíve lost some varieties, and am interested in getting them back.

This bulbifera tuber I had dug up yesterday and it weighed 4.756 kgs or  about 10.5 lbs. After boiling, it was soft but not mushy and slightly sweet! Much better than the arial tuber.




I guess it pays to renew the stock every once in a while! I think I may start doing that myself with my own bulbiferas.

Iím sorry to say that the bumpy CV-2 was among the varieties I lost (though CV-1 remains a survivor for me). Iíve justified growing them in totes for so long out of a fear of losing them to my heavy soil. But after several losses despite my best efforts, I get the feeling that they might actually have a better chance of weathering drought and accessing nutrients in my heavy clay instead of the tote containers.

I dug up these Dioscorea esculenta tubers today. Tubers from this vine is what Caesar has.


Theyíve borne decently well in the totes, but this next year I may put them into the clay ground as well. All I need is a pickaxe to fluff the soil at planting, and a good layer of mulch. They make good eating, but my methods havenít been good at yielding larger tubers (even the usually prodigious rotundata has repeatedly yielded baseball-sized tubers in my totes).


God I wish there were more folks involved in cultivating and selling the edible bulbiferas. It's an extraordinary producer and I'd love to get my hands on some.

Iíve been wishing the same for a long time. At the height of my collection, I had no less than 9 varieties (and possibly more). Iím now down to 3, at least. If there were more growers, replacing them would be simple, but now Iím nearly at a loss as to how to replace them. Some of my own sources no longer sell them. As to my own situation... it is the same as when I first started in this forum. The same little suburban backyard. No farm, no land. My efforts at obtaining them have waned, but Iíve not fully given up, and am looking forward to this next year. But to return from the digression, my current state of affairs is not conducive to the preservation of a species, let alone multiple varieties of space-needy vines.

In terms of bulbifera, I still have CV-1, Saipan Purple, and Mae-sai Yellow. I believe Sena may still be available from Stephward Estate (though they wouldnít likely call it that, I named it on my end). The one I call Nonthaburi Yellow still seems consistently available from the same eBay vendor. I still have my contact for the Tefoe varieties (Purple, Green, Yellow), but I havenít contacted him in a long time, so I donít know if heís still online. I donít know where to re-acquire Odisha Yellow, Africa or Mexico, and my source for Hawaii has been difficult to reach on my last attempts.

This has been my pet project, one of my most important efforts, and my failure to yield good results with what should be a very productive species has taken a mental toll on me. It is actually the biggest reason why Iíve dropped off the forums for so long.

The last couple of years I have propagated a bunch of dioscorea with varying soccess. The alatas went crazy. A few other types did o.k. About January when the vines had all dried out and some bulbous started dropping I carefully collected the bulbils and brought them into the house. Early March I put them in pots and back outside. Then the critter raids started. Everything got mixed up and no labels were left in place. Guess I'm going to have some now unidentified dioscorea....

Fading labels and shared containers were a big issue with my ability to identify varieties. Species ID is a cinch, but good luck telling different varieties apart during the growing season.

Rispa

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 385
    • Houston, TX
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #117 on: December 28, 2022, 01:49:14 AM »
Did you figure out how to manage tubors treated to not sprout? I'm really hoping I did it right this time by soaking them in water with ascorbic acid added (vitamin c capsules). The elephant garlic is definitely growing and very obviously doing well compared to the one I just soaked in water. No sign of growth from the purple and white sweet potatoes though.

Caesar

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 454
    • PR
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #118 on: December 28, 2022, 01:14:21 PM »
Did you figure out how to manage tubors treated to not sprout? I'm really hoping I did it right this time by soaking them in water with ascorbic acid added (vitamin c capsules). The elephant garlic is definitely growing and very obviously doing well compared to the one I just soaked in water. No sign of growth from the purple and white sweet potatoes though.

I wasnít aware that any tubers were treated to prevent sprouting (at least, not that I recall). I have planted sweet potatoes that ended up rotting, though. I gave my elephant garlic a soak in a water & bleach mix to prevent disease. It didnít seem to like the fluffy soil I gave it, though. It struggled for about a year, but eventually succumbed to rot. The Perennial Multiplier Leeks and Iíitoi Onions have survived like champs, and my toughest Allium has been the Rakkyo. The Canada Onion, Welsche Onions and Walking Onions have all adapted well enough, but the Potato Onions have done poorly for me (I still have some seed-grown survivors), and the Garlics and Grey Shallots ended up dying. The Grey Shallots looked like they might have had a chance under different soil, but I failed to order them this year, and theyíre sold out. All live Alliums were given the bleach water treatment prior to planting.

Rispa

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 385
    • Houston, TX
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #119 on: December 29, 2022, 03:49:44 AM »
I had issues with some really nice tasting and textured white skin, purple flesh sweet potatoes going to must. That's when I found that out. My first try at elephant garlic was a mess too. Here are pics of the difference between the two elephant garlic pots.




pagnr

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 942
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #120 on: January 02, 2023, 01:29:33 AM »
Vanuatu scientists develop new super hybrid yam,  Golden Hybrid Yam. This new hybrid variety was developed through the breeding of soft yam (Dioscorea Alata) and wild yam (Dioscorea Numularia) for increased resilient and adaptability to local conditions.
https://www.abc.net.au/pacific/programs/pacificbeat/vanuatu-golden-hybrid-yam/13542878
https://www.dailypost.vu/news/countdown-to-launch-of-vanuatu-golden-hybrid-yam/article_58d6c5b6-96db-5c2f-a753-c4c17b4b27f6.html
https://www.facebook.com/LivingInVanuatuNews/posts/golden-hybrid-yam-a-new-super-climate-resilient-yam-that-can-be-harvested-all-ye/4004878002951983/
« Last Edit: January 02, 2023, 01:35:02 AM by pagnr »

Caesar

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 454
    • PR
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #121 on: January 02, 2023, 10:35:52 AM »
Wow, thatís impressive! I didnít think those two species were close enough to crossbreed. Is there any source for them able and willing to ship overseas?

pagnr

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 942
    • View Profile
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #122 on: January 02, 2023, 03:38:01 PM »

It would be interesting to know if the hybrid Yams are on sale in markets in Vanuatu now, or if they will be grown in Neighbouring countries too.
When I lived in Cairns, Australia I used to enjoy Taro, Sweet Potato and Yams from PNG Ladies that sold them at the famous Rusty's Markets.

This info is from link 2
ďThere are 23 varieties of VGHY that were raised in multiplication plots in Santo, Tagabe Agriculture farm and the DARD Santo team will attend the NWA with 1 tonne of VGHY to be distributed to farmers through-out the country who will be participating in the NWA,Ē he said.

ďThis is a very special hybrid as it can be planted through-out the year or all year around. It can be harvested after six to 10 months unlike wild yam that can be harvested after three years.

ďAfter harvesting, its planting materials for replanting should be safely stored for two months which is its dormancy period.
ďDARDís aim is to distribute this new yam variety to all famers of Vanuatu by the end of 2021.Ē

norris

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • Kapoho, HI
    • View Profile
    • Permaculture, Perennial Polycultures & Resistance
Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #123 on: May 26, 2024, 06:58:57 PM »
I posted this info at the https://permies.com/t/80/131476/Edible-Air-Potato-Dioscorea-bulbifera thread Caesar started over there:

--------

Caesar sent me 4 varieties a year ago (thanks!)  I'm very motivated to find more diversity of the species. For me, air potatoes are second only to ulu (breadfruit) as a staple carbohydrate (my criteria are ease of growing, no soil disturbance, ease of harvest, ease of preparation, and availability.) Here's a report-back on what I've learned so far:

Mae-sai yellow: I planted 4. One vine made 50 or more small bulbils. After 3 20ish minute boils in changed water, they're still super bitter. I consider them inedible.

"very probably" (Caesar wasn't positive) Tefoe purple: I planted 4. I didn't compare the vines super closely to Caesar's photos, but at least superficially they do look like his Tefoe purple photos. At least one vine made several medium bulbils. The flesh is purple. If Joe Tefoe returns to this thread maybe he can say more, but in a listing where he's selling it, he says the edibility is unknown. But for me, as with Mae-sai yellow, 3 boils left them still super bitter and inedible.

CV-1: I received one small bulbil. The vine grew well last year but didn't make any bulbils. It's growing well again, so I should get some yield this year.

Saipan purple: I received one medium-small bulbil. The plant produced one large and several medium-small bulbils. I cut the large one in half to replant half (which is now shooting up vigorously). After the disappointments of Mai-sai yellow and the very probably Tefoe purple, and since Caesar described needing multiple boils of this, I expected I wouldn't find this variety useful. We already have the "Hawaii" variety here*, which only needs 20-30 minutes of steaming, so I wasn't motivated to do a careful trial with the Saipan purple. I boiled it for "a while" (maybe 30-40 minutes?), then tasted it expecting it to need a change of water and more boiling and thus for me to stop caring about the variety. But it had no bitterness! I didn't have any more bulbils I could try cooking, but I suspect it didn't need nearly as long a boiling as I gave it.

Needing to peel the tough skin off the Hawaii variety is the biggest drawback to this as a main staple. It's not *that* difficult or time consuming, but it is a drawback. My friends discovered that they can steam bulbils, then slice them thin and roast them with the skin still on, and the crispiness of it all makes eating the skin unnoticeable. So I wonder whether, even if the Saipan purple needs more cooking than Hawaii's 20ish minutes of steaming, the Saipan might work well steamed (or boiled), then sliced and fried to give it that extra cooking time. I should have lots of bulbils to test cooking requirements after this season.

For this season, I ordered what were listed as D. bulbifera from thailandplant on Ebay. Caesar wrote that he got what he calls "Nonthaburi yellow" from them years ago, but I think he's lost that variety. This listing shows bulbils with white flesh, so not the same one Caesar got. But the seller confirmed that this one is edible after 30 minutes of boiling, so I ordered a batch. The seller sent 6 instead of just the 3 promised by the listing, and so far 2 have sprouted well; 1 rotted; and 3 still have a chance. However, the vine is D. alata, not bulbifera. I'm a little disappointed, but the pictures show decent sized bulbils, so I think this could still be a useful aerial crop.

I messaged with the seller about the species misidentification and asked about the one Caesar purchased, which isn't listed for sale at this time. The seller sent some pictures of what looks like true bulbifera, and said it's used by most people only for medicine, but is eaten by people in hill tribes. This variety has yellow or orange flesh, and though I'm not positive they're the same, the pictures do look like Caesar's Nonthaburi yellow. The seller wrote:

Quote
The hill tribes eat Dioscorea bulbifera because they eat anything they can find. For other people, they tend to eat Dioscorea alata because its taste is better and it can be cooked in various ways, both savory and dessert. Dioscorea bulbifera has to be roasted to eat and if you want to boil it, it literally needs to be boiled in 2-3 changes of water as you said. So if you would like the one that is easy to cook, I recommend Dioscorea alata. You can boil it for only 20 minutes. Or if you boil it with coconut milk and add some sugar and pandan leaves, it's delicious.

So I don't think the Nonthaburi yellow is worth reacquiring.

Priorities for reacquiring seem to be CV-2, Sena, and Odisha yellow as known good edible types. "Mexico" and "Africa" might be good too, though there isn't enough info in Caesar's posts to know much about them.

I'm not able to send out air potatoes at this time. But I expect to be organized for selling seeds and corms and bulbils of various species by the end of the year, so can help then with spreading the varieties I have.

Interwoven Permaculture sells a few different Dioscorea bulbils, including "Hawaii" bulbifera (2 for $35).

And a tangential share: Our "Hawaii" variety starts making immature but yummy bulbils in July, which you can pick from the vine. Fully mature bulbils drop on their own from about November through February. Another friend found that he could keep stored bulbils edible until June by breaking off any shoots once a week. So with a little work, this is nearly a year-round crop!


* Note: I've lived in Hawai'i since 2012, and have only ever heard of one variety of bulbifera. Though I could be wrong, I believe that "Jim's Hawaii" and "Hawaii" and the one that's common in my area are all the same.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk