Temperate Fruit & Orchards > Temperate Fruit Discussion

Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid

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usirius:
Helo John, can you tell us, how this seedling did grow and if you can see any differences to a "normal" Paw Paw plant and to a "normal" Cherimoya plant? This would be very interesting for me also! Because I am also working on creating such an hybrid. I had stored Asimina triloba pollen in an refrigerator. At time my Chermioyas begin to bloom, and i am working to pollinate the flowers with Asimina pollen. Enclosed you will find a picture of my pollinating trial. One pollinated flower has fallen down but I think that I pollinated it too early - before female stage. Some more flowers will develop in the next days so I am hoping that I will get results. I will keep you informed about my success!

Triloba Tracker:
For informational purposes only:
Folks have tried crossing pawpaw with its tropical relatives before, if i'm not mistaken. Possibly as far back as Fairchild, Zimmerman...and possibly even Bill Whitman (I know he tried growing pawpaw but not sure about hybridizing).
Neal Peterson of eminent pawpaw fame has focused on Asimina inter-specific crosses and I believe had tried Annona crosses unsuccessfully prior to that (could be wrong on that).

To me the pawpaw is so unique and different from Annona species, i'm not sure what the goals of crossing would be. (legitimate question, not snark) :)

usirius:
Hello Triloba Tracker,

thanks for your comments and suggestions. I agree with you, there is not much chance of success, but who knows. I also researched a lot of literature and read testimonials on the subject, and everything I've read does not sound optimistic. But I mean, tasting is about studying. Certainly I have other individuals, live in another part of the world and certainly do not work in everything with the same parameters as all those who have already tried ... What motivates me is that I can already think of many things without much thought For example, the hybridization of Poncirus trifoliata with Citrus ichangensis, with Poncirus trifoliata as the parent plant, which was absolutely impossible according to literature research at the time .... it worked for me right away! Yes, the breeding goals you've been asking for, or the motivation to hybridize Annona and Asimina are the following - actually, I'd like to tweak some of Cherimoya's drawbacks:

- Cherimoya is subtropical, but not particularly cold tolerant. According to experience, light frosts are already causing massive damage to her. A hybrid could be a bit more cold-tolerant, but still suitable for warm climates (the pure Asimina develops poorly, it is poor in warm to hot regions)
- Cherimoya has a lot of seeds, but Paw Paw has few compared to the fruit mass, and there are also Paw Paw varieties that have very few seeds, taken as a parent ... .. A hybrid of both could be a kind of cranimoya with wizened cores
- The aroma of both parents is interesting in itself, in the mix, the Armoma could be a very special!
- Cherimoya has a relatively soft and sensitive skin, Asimina has a slightly more stable and pressure-sensitive consistency.
- Asimina has a clean separation of style and fear, even when ripe, she falls to the separation, and there is no hole in the fruit, which even when harvested to full maturity still allows a relatively long shelf life of the fruit. On the other hand, cherimoya dissolves from the stalk at full maturity, creating a crater-like wound in fear, from which mold and rot quickly spread, and spoil the fruit. A hybrid could have a smaller separation between style and fruit like cherimoya ....
- Pollination of Asimina-like flowers is easier for insects by the exposure of the inner flower parts, especially the female part, as pollination of the very closed female Cherimoya flower. A hybrid of both could have relatively exposed internal flower parts that are readily accessible to insects.
- last not least ... .The hybrid could be a cold-compatible pad for cherimoya, or you could ennoble these hybrids in addition to Asimina to grow as a hybrid in colder areas, or they as Zwischenveredlung (adapter) to then on to Cherimoya ennoble, also to culture in colder areas.

Maybe there are other arguments, but the mentioned ones motivate me anyway enough and enough to work on the hybrid. I've had it in my head for a long time, never done it, but after reading all that was written about it, I decided ....

Triloba Tracker:
I absolutely think you should do whatever you are driven to do! As we say, "there's a first time for everything."

Do you have mature Asimina triloba trees of your own? Or where are you getting your pollen?

I would quibble with a few of the things you mentioned about Asimina triloba:
1) If the fruit falls on its own, there will be a "scar" - a hole in the skin and slight indentation in the flesh. The fruit definitely does not have a clean separation like a mango or apple or pear. It can be cut at the peduncle to avoid this, but not if the fruit is in a cluster or if you are harvesting a lot of fruit.
2) The skin is actually usually quite thin and fragile. From the cherimoyas i've eaten, the cherimoya skin is much, much thicker and tougher than pawpaw
3) short shelf-life of pawpaw is considered one of its major drawbacks. I would say it's about the same as cherimoya, possibly worse.
4) i think a comparison of seed-to-flesh ratio of pawpaw and cherimoya would be interesting. Pawpaw is considered pretty "seedy" except for a few varieties particularly from Neal Peterson. Cherimoyas do have a lot of seeds, in a sense, but they are small and easily avoided. Pawpaw seeds are a little more annoying.

Take care!!

starch:

--- Quote from: Triloba Tracker on September 19, 2018, 08:29:38 AM ---
4) i think a comparison of seed-to-flesh ratio of pawpaw and cherimoya would be interesting. Pawpaw is considered pretty "seedy" except for a few varieties particularly from Neal Peterson. Cherimoyas do have a lot of seeds, in a sense, but they are small and easily avoided. Pawpaw seeds are a little more annoying.

Take care!!

--- End quote ---

It's funny because it is all relative. After eating lots of sugar apples that have *tons* of seeds, I don't think cherimoyas are all that seedy! It all depends on your basis of view :)

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