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Messages - Epicatt2

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1
Granular Imidacloprid is a systemic (spread udner a plant & watered in) and as a contact product sprayed on the affected plant and has worked well for me on my fruit trees and some ornamentals in my yard. 

Imidacloprid interrupts the ability of insects like aphids, scales, and mealiebugs to properly mature which causes them to be unable to reproduce.

It's not toxic to mammals/humans if if used as directed altho is is toxc to honeybees, so it is important wait to use it until after your plant has finished flowering.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Would GOOD sugar apple seeds float??
« on: February 03, 2023, 05:38:58 PM »
Just FWIW . . .

I did the paper towel / ziploc baggie thing with some sugarapple seeds, but moistened the seeds and toweling using diluted 3% H2O2 to gently sterilize the seeds and kill any mold spores.  (The peroxide breaks down quickly, leaving behind only water.) 

Seemed to work fine and my seeds germinated without having to change the paper toweling.

Paul M.
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3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Would GOOD sugar apple seeds float??
« on: February 03, 2023, 03:28:15 AM »
I put a paper towel over the top of the water to break the surface tension. That way the seeds actually soak.

What a great idea!  Thanx . . . .  I'm going to try this.

Just curious . . .  How long did it take those floaties to germinate for you?

Paul M.
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4
I'm in an area of east Seminole Heights, Tampa (Zone 9b).  My neighborhood sits on a broad-topped hill so much of the cold air seems to run down to lower areas of a nearby neighborhood.  This seems to minimize the coldest air settling on the ground in my part of the neighborhood unless a hard freeze is predicted.

But the effect is that many of my orchids or my tropical fruit trees (which are still in pots) tend to be spared the worst of the cold if they are near or under tree canopies in my yard.  Of course they must be moved indoors or covered if it goes much colder thatn 32º for more than an hour or two.

The only things that got damaged in this year's two Xmastime cold snaps (we got down to 33 or 32º for one night) were my bananas (burnt leaves) plus A. reticulata, A. diversifolia, my small sugar apple, two ilamas and my biribá and an achiote all defoliated.  Everything else seems to have slid through with no apparent damage.  A seedling mango 'Pickering' also defoliated but the stem/trunk is still green.  Several green sapotes were fine and two canistel 'Trompo' had their leaves turn yellowish green but that seem to have recovered.  Several pomgranates and a fingersop and several guavas were also unaffected.

So Shovel n Seed, the Tampa area may be a place to consider.  There is even at least one neighborhood (near McKay Bay in Tampa) which, not unlike the Pinellas peninsula, may verge on being zone 10a.  Gibsonton just a few miles south of Tampa along US 41 might also offer some warmer areas.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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5
It would be wise to restart the Poll and add one rule "Only vote if you have tasted both fruits".

I was thinking much the same thing, but vote only if you have tasted at least one of a pair.

Doing so might offer up a more realistic result, overall.

JM2¢W . . .

Paul M.
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6
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Selling: some plants
« on: January 13, 2023, 11:50:06 PM »
Saludos Abimael.  Plants arrived today, promptly & in good condition.

Muy amable!

Paul M.
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7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Thoughts on 9waters?
« on: January 11, 2023, 01:28:33 PM »
I’ve only had good experiences with them. Some prices are a little high but they give you a break when you order multiple plants.

I have to aggree that his prices have morphed upwards to being rather on the pricey side for these often smaller sized plants but he does offer a reasonable discount for multiple orders of many of his plants.

But at least now '9waters' factors the shipping costs into the pricing of his plants.

Also things I've ordered from him have always come well packaged, in fact so well packed in my experience that it requires no small effort to unpack them.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Thrip damage on avocado fruit
« on: December 31, 2022, 04:18:39 AM »
Shawn,

A thrips (= singular & plural) is a tiny insect with rasping mouthparts which it uses to scrape away plant tissues from the surfaces of leaves, flower petals, and fruit skins.  That results in an abraded area that scabs over and is unsightly.

Thrips control and prevention is thoroughly discussed on this website for California but should be applicable for the avocado thrips here in Florida:

AVOCADO THRIPS  (Scirtothrips perseae)
https://ipm.ucanr.edu/agriculture/avocado/avocado-thrips/

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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9
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Selling: some plants
« on: December 29, 2022, 06:55:15 PM »
Hola Abimael.

PM sent…

PM
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10
Good to hear about the Fingersop, Epicatt2. I have some seedlings going, and was debating whether or not I wanted yet another plant to worry about when it got cold. Has yours flowered or fruited yet?

Hi Fliptop,

Got my fingersop about two years ago from Abimael in PR as  a 4-inch pot seedling about 8-inches tall.  It is now about 2-1/2 ft tall. 

It is maintaining its conical, xmas-tree like shape as it increases in size.  It is growing a bit faster (but not that much faster) now that it's larger but apparently it's still too small yet to try to flower or set fruit.  Maybe this coming summer season it will.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
Tampa — Zone 9b
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11
Looks like I was right at 32ºF on both mornings of 12/23 & 12/24 although it might've dipped to 31º briefly.  I didn't see any frost in my yard on either of those two coldest days. but I did cover a few of the more tender things (aroids, Colocasias) on my north facing front porch using empty 5- and 7-gallon pots and they were fine afterwards.

I see that out in the yard my large Achiote (Bixa orellana) plant in a 7-gal pot is busy dropping all its leaves.  So far my biribá (Rollinia) seems unaffected.  All the citrus, most of the Annonas, the Eugenias, and bananas seem fine, too. 

But on the front porch my Annona reticulata 'São Paolo' (pink fleshed; in a 3 gal from Lara Farms) has darkening leaves, but I think the plant itself may be all right.  Right next to it on the porch a pink fruited ilama  A. diversifolia 'DeepPurple' looks like it's getting ready to go deciduous after this cold episode.

My several mangos look ok so far except for a 'Pickering' seedling which lost its leaves and the tiny, just startng  to expand leaves on it have turned yellowish green.  WIll have to wait to see if it recovers.

Pouteria viridis (3) and P. campechiana (2) which were left uncovered out in the yard all seem ok.   

And the Meoigyne cilindrocarpa (fingersop) out in the yard in a 7-gal pot seems unaffected.

All in all lots less damage than I was expecting to see.

Let's hope the rest of our winter cold snaps are less brutal this year!

Cheers!

Paul M.
FLA  33610 - Zone 9b
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12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hunt for the best Surinam Cherry
« on: December 27, 2022, 01:47:29 PM »
It's often possible to salvage some resinous-tasting pitangas (Eugenia uniflora).  The trick is to let them get full ripe so that if you just touch them they fall off the bush right into your hand, and then collect them in a bowl and leave them, covered, in the 'fridge overnight.  This has the effect of helping to dissapate the resinousness aspect of the fruit.

This will work on some but not all pitangas (Eugenia uniflora), depending, of course, upon how strong the resinousness in a particular cultivar may be.  This is primarily useful for the red-fruited ones. It can be less so for the dark/black-fruited ones which can tend to be less (or not) resinous tasting than the red-fruited ones.

Might be worth a try for our TFF members to see whether their red-fruited variety loses the resinous taste by allowing them to sit in the 'fridge overnight.

[Now this has me wondering whether giving them an overnighting in the 'fridge would work with pitangatubas (Eugenia selloi) which have fairly tart fruit but which might sweeten up slightly after chilling them.]

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cold tolerant Annonas
« on: December 21, 2022, 06:25:51 PM »
Wondering what would be the top 5 most cold-tolerant Annonas?

[snip]
3) Annona montana ?
[snip]
/quote]

To answer your question, we'll see how my A. montana does after this coming weekend when here in Tampa we are being told 33º and 35ºF for lows.  I'm not putting anything in unless our weatherman forecasts 32º or lower.  (This is part of my tropical fruit forest's ongoing cold-tolerance experiment.)

If we get frost though then I'll go out early and spray all my plants down before the sun comes up and hits them to try to prevent leaf burning.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
Tampa - Zone 9b
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14
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: WANTED Hua Moa banana pup.
« on: December 19, 2022, 03:05:55 AM »
Going Bananas in Homestead lists Hua Moa as available from them.

Just FWIW, I grew it once and it was highly cold sensitive here in zone 9b, which I learned the hard way.

One alternative maybe, would be to visit one of the Latino supermarkets near you to ask if they have a banana called 'Hawaiana', which is the name of Hua Moa in spanish.  (The Cubans like to use 'Hawaiana' to make fried plantains.)  I found it easier to just buy the fruit instead of trying to keep that cultivar alive and happy.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit Trees with high ornamental value
« on: December 04, 2022, 02:12:19 AM »
yeah I've fallen in love with the way breadfruit looks after this. Guess I never looked into it at first because of the name ? idk. but wow. Probably my favorite from the whole thread tbh

Well tru, I'd love to grow breadfruit in 9b but we're too cold for it here.  Beautiful, ornamental, distinctive-looking tree with interesting-looking fruit.  Love the tree's large palmate leaves.

Only had it once in Belize many years ago.  The landlady there where we were staying in San Ignacio peeled it, ti cored it, the cut it into wedges and fried it.  Delicious but indistinguishable from french fried potato, but that was a good thing. 

Someday would like to try breadfruit prepared in other ways but I have never seen this fruit for sale in any central Florida markets.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit Trees with high ornamental value
« on: November 27, 2022, 11:36:44 AM »
Just to chime in . . .

I find that I'm quite partial to how my Biribá (Rollinia deliciosa aka Annona mucosa) looks, very tropical, as well as my several ilamas (Annona macroprophyllata).  I find them graceful. 

Also my white sapote (Casimiroa edulis) is nice to look at with its palmately compound leaves.  Hoping that mine will give me some fruit soon.

Paul M.
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17
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: 2022 PayPal taxes
« on: November 25, 2022, 08:51:52 PM »
If a hobbyist in Florida is buying tropical fruits, fruit or veggie seeds, or fruit trees in Florida there is no tax on items considered as foodstuffs for personal consumption. 

I know it's true –at least here in Florida– but one may have tp provide an affidavit to verify that what you are buying is to be used to produce food, or is food, for personal consumption.

I'm no expert, but I learned this from the State of Florida department that oversees sales taxes in our State.  They have a detailed document that includes food plants and seeds, showing them as being exempt from sales tax.

This may be useful information for online buyers and sellers in Florida, but of course as mentioned elsewhere in this thread, different States may have different rules.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Grumichama
« on: November 23, 2022, 01:34:39 PM »
Suggest that you plant them together in pairs for better pollination.  It will be less stressful, too, since pulling or cutting them apart will stress or shock the roots.

Once they are old enough to bloom and set fruit you can evaluate the fruit and its flavor and if not so good or not productive you could prune one of the two away from each pair as necessary (or no)t and just leave the better tasting one(s).

That is what I would do in a situation similar to yours.

Paul M.
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19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Abiu seedling tips needed
« on: November 12, 2022, 01:46:50 PM »
I had a similar problem with abiu....  I got six fresh seeds from a member in Bradenton, FL area and planted them upon receipt in a 12-inch community pot.  Four germinated immediately  but two never did. 

The four that germinated grew like gangbusters and eventually I potted them into one gallon pots where they kept growing and soon needed to go into threes.  Then some months later three of them got big enough that they needed to go into five gallons. The fourth one had stopped growing and eventually died.

The three remaining ones grew well in the fives for a few months then just stopped growing when the weather cooled off in November.  After some below forty degree weather two of those stopped growing and dropped some of their leaves.  The last one held its leaves but also did not grow and gradually after the cold months passed and warm weather returned it just sat there losing a leaf now and then.

Now that last one sometimes tries to make a few small leaves but is not growing any more and I cannot figure out if it is still sulking from the past cold weather or there is something else cultural that it is lacking.

Any suggestions would be welcomed.

Paul M.
Tampa - Zone 9b
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20
After reading that kwai muk is apparently cold tolerant enough to survive here in Florida 9b that convinced me to try growing it. 

This species, from the descriptions of the fruit and its flavor that I've read about, sounds clearly underrated.

Paul M.
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21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Your absolute favorite FL fruit tree
« on: November 06, 2022, 04:46:41 PM »
My favorite citrus is the 'Duncan' grapefruit for its taste which makes its seediness a no brainer. 

That is followed by the mandarin, 'Clementine'.  I have a 'Nules Clementine' and it is also really tasty.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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22
Is anyone on the TFF here growing this batwing leafed, yellow flowered passion vine?

My vine grew well all summer and I was hoping to get it to set some fruit because I am curious to taste it since I can find no reports on the flavor of the smallish fruits.  So far no fruit set.

But now the leaves are getting a yellowish cast to them and I'm not sure why exactly.  It may be a deficiency or possibly it wants more fertilizer.  It gets watered regullarly and receives half a day's sun, then shade in the afternoon.

I'm hoping that one of our TTF members maybe can offer me some suggestions for how they are succeeding with this fairly recently discovered species.

Any & all suggestions welcomed....

TIA

Paul M.
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23
Wow Harley, what great-looking seedlings those Quararibea cordata pics you posted show; it's good to see such healthy seedlings of this species! 

But I'm also with 'hammer', though because I had problems growing this species out-of-doors once the weather turned cooler here in Florida zone 9b.  They proved to be cold intolerant for me.

I don't know if this species maybe ranges into any higher elevations in Colombia than Cali, or whether it is strictly a lowland, warmth-loving species.  It might be nice to try this species again if there were some that were sourced from a higher elevation in its habitat, should such an option exist.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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24
I am curious too.  My Geffner has its first significant crop.  Last year it made two tiny fruits that fell off early so I don't really count that. 

Mine did pretty much the same last year, Brian.

Quote
Not sure when to pick them, they don't have far to fall so waiting until they drop is a possibility.  Not sure what typical fruit size is for these, I assumed the current ones I have are still undersized

The one surviving fruit on my 'Gefner' looks to be about the same size as yours in the photo that you posted above, and appears about as spiky, too.

Don't know if mine will get any/much larger before it ripens –if it ripens at all. Some of my tree's leaves are beginnng to yellow and some have dropped but the fruit still looks okay.  I'm guessing the leaf-fall is due to the week of cool overnight temps that we had here in west central Florida about ten days ago.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
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25
As I recall our Gefner blooms mostly in March/April and most of the fruit comes ripe in September/October.

Thanks, Galatians.  I guess that I'd better start keeping an closer eye on it.

Paul M.
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