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Messages - Galatians522

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1
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Plum varieties for Zone 9?
« on: May 25, 2022, 11:12:50 PM »
I'm in upper 9a FL. From what I have tried only Santa Rosa and methley survive here well. And Chickasaw, and seedlings, but.. I tried Bruce, yellow, excelsior, and possibly another type or two and they have died.
( excelsior and Bruce may have gotten too shaded. But I honestly don't think that's really what killed them). To be fair the yellows I tried last year may have had some type of gummosis or bacteria when I got them on clearance.. but for ones that I have tried healthy, insects and bacteria/fungus are what usually get them.
I'm trying a bruce again for the heck of it. Will plant it way away from any shade this time!

That is interesting. Do you happen to know if any of the failed trees were on peach root stock? I have a Scarlet Beauty plum on peach, native plum, and self rooted. Peach is by far the poorest performer even though it is the recommended rootstock. I believe it is the reason many plums are not longer lived here in Florida. The tree on native plum has grown the best, but the own rooted tree seems to be doing fine and is far better than the one on Nemaguard. From now on I plan to graft all my plums to the native stock. Scarlet Beauty has been our most rock solid plum here. I wonder how it would perform for you?

2
I think leaf burn is the main reason for not spraying above 80. If all you have is a stump with no sprouts, I don't think that will be an issue. I was told that the issue with leaf burn can also be avoided by spraying in the evening so the spray can dry over night.

Right now it is basically a naked tree with no sprouts. Iíll go ahead and spray now but my understanding is that you need 2-3 months of treatment so eventually Iíll have to spray when it leafs out. Now that I hear Julieís tree was killed, Iím even more concerned. I guess I will test it out on small sections at first.

It was a very small tree only like 1.5 years old that died.  The mature healthy trees will survive the treatment.  You have no option but to get the treatment ASAP or remove the trees.  The LEM infection is just going to get worse if you leave it.
 However, the treatment didn't eradicate the LEM in my mature tree.  Reporting to the state isn't going to do anything, the LEM infection is very widespread here in FL.  I agree with everything Galatians said based on my experience.  Galatians, do you have any tips on these questions:

(1) How do you recommend spraying a large tree?  Do I need to buy a backpack sprayer with a blower?
(2) What are the health effects associated with continually spraying sulphur?  For me personally (everyone has to do what's best for them), I'm trying to keep my yard organic and don't spray any of my trees routinely.

Julie, unfortunately we have found that it is difficult to spray a large tree even with semi-professional equipment. We are currently planning to keep our trees under 10' or 12' instead of the 25' or more that they were in the past. You would likely be able to spray a 10-12' tree with a back pack or pump sprayer. The difficulty with that is that sulfur tends to come out of suspension and needs constant agitation--so you would have to stop and shake every few minutes.

Fortunately, sulfur is incredibly safe--many products are even labeled organic, including the product recommended for mite control (microthiol dispress). My Dad also feels that this product gives better coverage, for what it is worth. I am not an expert regarding long term exposure, but it was my understanding that some people actually take sulfur supplements, so I am thinking the toxicity level must be quite low. I can say from personal experience that it is corrosive so you would want to wear eye protection and remove any metal that will tarnish (such as jewelery) before you spray.

3
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Variegated sparkleberry
« on: May 25, 2022, 05:54:51 PM »
very cool. I've got a sparkleberry growing on the lot next to me that is over 20ft tall.  It's a tree!

I remember seeing the picture. That may be worth propagating as a root stock. It looked like it was mostly a single trunk without many toot suckers.

4
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Variegated sparkleberry
« on: May 24, 2022, 08:17:32 PM »
Waiting to see a persimmon or paw paw like this haha. Have you seen any like this? Ive been noticing a few other native species mostly weeds lately with that same yellow/green variegation. Could something be to this??

I know with Camelias it can be due to a viral infection. It does not typically harm the plant much, but it does lend an interesting effect.

5
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Plum varieties for Zone 9?
« on: May 23, 2022, 10:10:45 PM »
Figured that I would be good to report back. The Guthrie plum I purchased from Mail Order Natives in October had a few blooms this year in a 3 gal pot. And we only got 75 hours of chill. Also, Flavorella plumcot bloomed heavily. I was shocked to see how little chill it needed.

6
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Variegated sparkleberry
« on: May 23, 2022, 10:02:37 PM »
Nice!

7
My mature lychee trees were treated for the lychee mite by the state of Florida last year.  Out of 7 trees, the 3 emperor lychees did just fine, the 2 sweethearts regrew 2/3 of their foliage, one Kaimana regrew only a few leaves and then died, and the other kaimana only has 1/3 of its foliage now.  The emperors were the only ones to bear fruit this year.  Every other previous year, I have had fruit set on all of those trees.

It is interesting that you bring this up. We are noticing that cultivars vary in resilience to this pest and the treatment. Emperor seems to be holding up better for some reason.

8
Rosie Gold was first, then Glen.
I've never tried Glenn but I hope to in the future. I recently acquired a somewhat large Angie from a friend for transplanting several good size lychee trees. I think the next variety to be harvested will be dwarf Hawaiian followed by Pickering







Glenn has a mild flavor, so it is not going to be a "WOW!" experience like your first taste of a Zill creation. It is highly productive, however, and very resistant to disease. It is about as close as one can come to a maintenance free mango, but I would not say that it is a must have for the connoisseur.

9
I think leaf burn is the main reason for not spraying above 80. If all you have is a stump with no sprouts, I don't think that will be an issue. I was told that the issue with leaf burn can also be avoided by spraying in the evening so the spray can dry over night.

Right now it is basically a naked tree with no sprouts. Iíll go ahead and spray now but my understanding is that you need 2-3 months of treatment so eventually Iíll have to spray when it leafs out. Now that I hear Julieís tree was killed, Iím even more concerned. I guess I will test it out on small sections at first.

I don't think you can spot spray a tree and expect any effective level of treatment. Think of this like chemo therapy. If you have the mite, your tree will not have a long or productive life. It may look healthy for a time, but over a period of months or years it will start to decline and will eventually become non productive or die. While the treatment may kill the tree, there is a chance that you can save it with the treatment. After that, you will probably have to keep spraying sulfur to keep the mite from returning--unless there can be a successful eradication of the mite from our state. From now on, growing lychee in Florida will require a much higher level of care than we have been used to. Any trees that are to be kept will likely need to be short enough to completely cover with periodic sprays. I wish FDACS had responded in a timely manner to prevent the destruction of an entire industry in our state. This is very sad for us since we have been growing lychees for over 30 years.

10
I think leaf burn is the main reason for not spraying above 80. If all you have is a stump with no sprouts, I don't think that will be an issue. I was told that the issue with leaf burn can also be avoided by spraying in the evening so the spray can dry over night.

11
Rosie Gold was first, then Glen.

12
Do both.

I understand they are so overwhelmed that they may not get to your tree for some time.
Report so someone can come out and confirm (though I assume you can confirm for yourself) and put a dot on the map for where erinose mite exists.

Then implement  you planned treatment strategy.

I don't know the answer to your question about MICROTHIOL DISPERSS, a thought when I last looked at this was that it was super fine at 3 micron average particle size, which to me might mean better spread.
If you don't have any Sulphur buy the recommended.  If you do, use what you have will be my my approach.
.

I agree. The recommended sulfur works better, causes less leaf burn, and is easier to spray. If you can't get that, use what you can find. If you are seeing the brown felt, you have a lot more mites then you realize. Make sure to spray both trees thoroughly and burn or bury infested foliage.

13
I think he is under MarktLee. Had to change user name because of password issues or somthing like that.

14
Unfortunately, any lychee that you find this year will not be cheap (or even "reasonably priced") from what I am hearing. I addition to the lychee mite and the devastation it has caused, we had a year with few chill hours over all but included a hard freeze.

15
I donít think I have a lack of cold weather problem here in western NC. Iím going to cut open some fruit and assess further.

I was assuming that a sour orange in zone 6b would be in a greenhouse.

16
Citrus fruits turn orange because of cold/cool temperatures (just like fall leaves). In tropical places the peel will be green even when ripe. Here in Florida late ripening varieties (like Valencia) will start to turn green again as the weather warms back up. Maybe that is the case with your fruit. If it has been hanging on the tree that long, it is ripe (or even over ripe). I have eaten Valencia that hung for around 20-24 months. Usually the top half of the fruit is dry.

17
Maybe the nut is a calophyllum species. It appears that the platter is natural medicine of sorts (no one that I have ever heard of ate noni because they liked the taste), so that would fit in.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Terrible season
« on: May 15, 2022, 04:18:48 PM »
I think part of it is the bounce back from a great season last year.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: whick rootstock is this?
« on: May 15, 2022, 10:01:06 AM »
Cleopatra has small pointed leaves, like most of the small fruited seedy mandarin species.

Good point, the leaf tip does look rounded.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A watermellon question.....
« on: May 14, 2022, 11:31:33 PM »
I had a local watermelon grower tell me that crimson sweet is more disease resistant. If disease is a problem, maybe that would be a good one to try (especially since you mention that it is available there).

21
I probably waited too long to try my emperor lychee. I left them on the tree so they were very ripe. That is the way I like my Brewster lychee. But that is probably what caused the emperor lychee to be flat and bland. My emperor didnít flower this year so I will have to wait until next year to try them again.

Bill

I would definitely give that a try when it fruits again. It took 10 years and an article from Australia for us to figure out that we were waiting too long to harvest the Florida Hak Ip and Sweet Heart.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Cold Hardy Dragonfruit?
« on: May 14, 2022, 11:15:32 PM »
My yellow variety I started from a piece of plant attached to a fruit from an Asian market. It survived our early 2021 insane record winter here in Texas. We lost power and water for 2 weeks so my main greenhouse got down to 26f. I had a little dieback. Maybe 10%.

Wow, I had always thought that the yellow Dragonfruit was more sensitive to cold.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Cold Hardy Dragonfruit?
« on: May 14, 2022, 11:13:45 PM »
I gave my parents some cuttings of Purple Haze and Voodoo Child and they made it through upper 20ís in north Florida just fine.

That is interesting, did they protect them at all, or were the vines in a naturally shelters spot like under trees or againstva house?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Most Cold Hardy Dragonfruit?
« on: May 14, 2022, 03:05:22 PM »
Texas Mark posted a while back about how his Sugar Dragon survived some pretty extreme cold when his green house lost power. That got me thinking that there might be some clones with more cold tollerence than most people realize. I was hoping everyone could chime in on what varieties they are growing and what temperature they have survived without getting damaged. My Delight got toasted pretty good in the mid 20s here. I am especially interested in information on any of the forms of Paul Thimpson's S8 (Sugar Dragon/Voodoo Child) and Houghton (its parent) if you have them. Thanks for your help!

25
In our grove, Emperor is best when there is still some yellow on the peel up until the point that it gets to the fully red stage. If it gets purplish, it will typically be flat. Sweetheart and Florida Hak Ip are also best when there is still some green and can even be picked when they are about half red/green. In contrast, Brewster should NEVER be picked until it has fully changed color to red (if you like tangy) or dark red/purple if you like mainly sweet. Maybe someone from California could comment since it is probably different, but that is the rule of thumb here in Central Florida

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