Author Topic: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state  (Read 1076 times)

SoCal2warm

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Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« on: March 11, 2021, 05:17:10 PM »
Yuzu seedling in Olympia, WA, in Yashiro Japanese garden.

The seedling is growing on its own roots, and is not covered during winter. The plant is a little over two and a half feet high. Still has its leaves, which don't look too bad.

The city is in climate zone 8a but the garden is in the downtown area, so it might get a little less cold.

picture taken March 11, 2021
47 degrees latitude north

Laaz

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2021, 07:27:22 PM »

lol!

SoCal2warm

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2021, 08:25:11 PM »

lol!
And what do you find so funny?

You do realize that it's more challenging growing hardy citrus in the Pacific Northwest climate zone 8a than it is in the Southeast zone 8a?
This is the farthest north I am aware of Yuzu growing outside in the ground, uncovered, in North America.
With the possible exception of Vancouver island, but that's a really unique location there because of being surrounded by water, and even then they have to resort to certain special strategies.
The winters in Olympia typically get just a little colder than they do in Seattle or Vancouver, BC.

All the more notable because this is surviving growing on its own roots, not grafted to trifoliata.

swincher

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2021, 11:43:30 PM »

lol!
And what do you find so funny?

You do realize that it's more challenging growing hardy citrus in the Pacific Northwest climate zone 8a than it is in the Southeast zone 8a?
This is the farthest north I am aware of Yuzu growing outside in the ground, uncovered, in North America.
With the possible exception of Vancouver island, but that's a really unique location there because of being surrounded by water, and even then they have to resort to certain special strategies.
The winters in Olympia typically get just a little colder than they do in Seattle or Vancouver, BC.

All the more notable because this is surviving growing on its own roots, not grafted to trifoliata.

Definitely impressive! I know a few people with yuzu on trifoliate here in Seattle, but always in sheltered locations against houses. Not aware of any on own roots.

Balance

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2021, 12:51:59 AM »
Impressive! Gives me hope for mine, I have recently sprouted nearly half a dozen yuzu seeds from a member of the forums and have them growing in my greenhouse. As mine get larger, I plan to plant them in ground with little to no protection, depending on how severe the winter is supposed to be. Hoping for some homegrown citrus in the coming years! :)

lebmung

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2021, 05:58:55 PM »
I would graft an yuzu on a yuzu seedling rather than PT in zone 8a. Yuzu is a good rootstock used in the past in Japan. The difference would be with dormancy period and tap root as advantage. If the soil is free of nematodes and root rot pathogens then it should be no problems.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2021, 07:26:57 PM »
I planted a small Yuzu and a Changsha in the ground as an experiment to see how they would do. Both of them are only 4 inches tall, growing on their own roots. The Yuzu is a seedling and the Changsha was a rooted cutting, and so is much thicker than the Yuzu. They are right next to each other. They are in a protected location, but were not protected or covered. I can provide an update now, it appears both of them were able to survive through the winter outside.
The Yuzu lost all its leaves, and the leaves on the Changsha do not look so good, only marginally alive, it looks like maybe only one of the leaves might be able to recover. Both of them are now beginning to put out a small flush of new leaf bud growth. They both look like they are growing with about the same amount of vigor now.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2021, 07:33:30 PM by SoCal2warm »

orangedays

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2021, 09:13:32 AM »
soCal2warm - Thanks for the note on the yuzu vs changsha.  I bought two rooted yuzu this spring and was wondering if they are more cold hardy than changsha, I want to plant them out doors this summer. It sounds like yuzu and changsha are close in hardiness. I planted about 20 changsha seedlings, 18 inches tall, in an very exposed area this winter. The majority suffered considerable leaf damage and top die-back of about 6 -10 inches but are sprouting out vigorously now.  Our lowest lows were floating around 20 F this winter but they can go down to 5 F on rare occasions. I also kept 3 potted changsha tree with 3/4 inch trunks in the shade of large trees. The potted changsha showed no damage at all and bloomed this spring. Also the changsha seedlings closest to the wood line had very little cold damage.  Based on your results, it sound like I should protect the yuzu until they are a little bigger and maybe plant them close to large trees. Its good to know yuzu is growing outside in Seattle.  I have friends near by who want to grow yuzu but think its a dead end due to long cold spells common to the area.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2021, 07:51:53 PM »
Thanks for the note on the yuzu vs changsha. It sounds like yuzu and changsha are close in hardiness.
Yuzu is more hardy than Changsha. These are not my only Yuzu and Changsha plants. I can see it in the color of the leaves, the exposure to cold does not cause the Yuzu leaves to turn as yellowish in hue as the Changsha, which I have found is usually is a good indicator of hardiness. (Although strangely the leaves of both of my two Ichang papeda plants turn very pale and yellowish, so maybe this is not always the case)

It seems like Yuzu is not all that much more hardy than Changsha though, although I cannot say for sure based on personal experiences.

This is purely anecdotal and could be wrong but I get the feeling that Yuzu can start growing vigorously at a little bit of a lower temperature level than Changsha, although both are vigorous growing varieties. Changsha loves hot temperatures though and might take off faster than Yuzu in climates with hotter temperatures.

They both seem to recover from damage well, which may not be the case with all cold hardy varieties.

I've tasted the fruits from both, freshly picked from the tree, and while the peels of Yuzu are tender and kind of edible, the peels of Changsha are definitely not. Most people will tell you the inside of a Changsha is better eating quality than the inside of a Yuzu though. Might only be a little bit better, it is a little subjective.


Its good to know yuzu is growing outside in Seattle.
I don't know how well Yuzu would grow in Seattle. Where I am has very slightly colder average winter temperatures than Seattle, but also gets a little hotter in the summer. The plants really need that heat, due to the cool climate and shorter growing season here.

As you go only a little bit north of Seattle, there are many areas that get very little heat most of the year.

That can be difficult to imagine for people who live in the South. There are some big climate differences despite the fact that we both may live in zone 8a.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2021, 08:33:38 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2021, 09:11:39 PM »
Here's the Yuzu seedling as of June 29, 2021



The trunk looks like it's gaining some thickness. Now maybe just a little bit thicker than pencil-thickness.

The coloration of the leaves look just okay, not really good and healthy but not too bad either. The older leaves have regained most of their green color back since the winter.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2021, 04:26:22 PM »
Here's a picture that was taken on September 1, 2021



The Yuzu is getting bigger and growing fast. At the time of this picture it was putting out a new flush of leaf growth.
The trunk seems to be noticeably thickening as well.

I would estimate the plant must be about 3 feet tall right now. (I think plants grow faster when they are growing on their own roots)

nullroar

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2021, 02:46:35 PM »
My Yuzu survived last winter in the ground in rural north Alabama (7b)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Yuzu seedling growing in Washington state
« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2021, 06:26:38 PM »
Picture taken October 7, 2021


The crushed up leaves smell very pleasantly spicily fragrant, more mild and less harsh than the smell of normal citrus leaves.
I mean I could almost imagine the leaves being used as a perfume ingredient.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2021, 06:31:56 PM by SoCal2warm »

 

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