Author Topic: Use of Granite (cherry stone grit) in containers  (Read 153 times)

franklazar26

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Use of Granite (cherry stone grit) in containers
« on: November 02, 2021, 06:23:26 AM »
I just wanted to run this by a few more knowledgeable people than I.. I wanted to use the remainder of my cherry stone grit in my citrus containers but wanted to ensure there wouldnít be drawbacks. It is made of granite stone, no larger than that of turface/smaller pea gravel. Since itís an igneous rock, I know it has a high mineral content, but they tend not to leach unless in powdered form. Correct me if Iím wrong here?

pagnr

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Re: Use of Granite (cherry stone grit) in containers
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2021, 08:04:46 AM »
Granite should be ok. It is ok for Aquariums also, which should be an extra indication of suitability.
It is inert, but unlike clay particles, perlite etc, doesn't absorb water. That could either be an advantage or disadvantage, depending on requirements.
Because of its density, it is not prone to float onto the surface like some other light components.
Very fine milled granite is a source of K, potassium in organic farming. Silica is also present, which is a mineral often ignored in fertiliser applications.

franklazar26

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Re: Use of Granite (cherry stone grit) in containers
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2021, 08:17:54 AM »
Awesome, thank you for your input! I originally planned to use it as a main component in bonsai substrate. So I will likely use it as that, as well as citrus container mixes.

Millet

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Re: Use of Granite (cherry stone grit) in containers
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2021, 09:49:02 AM »
It has been used in container culture for quite some time.  Even for citrus trees.

 

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