Author Topic: Jackfruit grafting question  (Read 914 times)

Forester

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Jackfruit grafting question
« on: November 24, 2021, 03:02:21 AM »
Hi guys, I read that jackfruit grafting is complicated by a large release of latex, so I had a question, how best to do it? Maybe someone knows a YouTube video where different methods of jackfruit grafting are clearly shown? Regards!

ben mango

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2021, 07:53:56 PM »
I would like to hear more about people who have success grafting jackfruit. Seems many claim best to grow from seed, but the results can vary a lot. Some nurseries in India use bud grafting and get a high success rate, it is not clear to me how / when to collect the buds and it is not as easy as cleft

Finca La Isla

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2021, 08:27:36 PM »
This interests me too.  I have just planted two Jakfruit grafts that weíre approach grafted.  I am also cleft grafting but itís not easy to get them to take.
Gary Zillís nursery here in CR does a kind of modified cleft that seems to take pretty well.
Peter

Galatians522

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2021, 09:32:14 PM »
Approach grafting seems to work fairly well. Also, young grafted trees seem to get a substantial boost from having a second rootstock planted next to them and similarly approach grafted. It seems to fix the "graft anemia" young jackfruit have.

ben mango

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2021, 10:36:45 PM »
approach grafts donít always hold long/term and generally the graft isnít as strong as with a cleft. itís limiting how many you can do as itís not always easy to tie a container to the tree and select a branch which is growing vertically. Itís not really a good option for any commercial operation

W.

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2021, 02:07:10 AM »
There was an article posted on the Forum a few weeks ago about an Indian grower who is the Johnny Appleseed of jackfruits. The article mentioned that, in India, grafted jackfruits do not live very long (I am not going to search for the article but I think it said 10-15 years). I wonder if all the problems you all are mentioning contribute to a short lifespan for grafted trees, even the ones where the grafts do take.

Forester

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2021, 05:04:35 AM »
What about rooting cuttings? how complicated is this process? I saw a post on the forum that someone has taken root in the water. And how are things with durian? Is it as difficult or are there no such problems as with jackfruit? And is it possible to make dwarf plants from jackfruit and durian?

Forester

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2021, 06:54:39 AM »
Do you think it really works?
https://youtu.be/DU2E7yPViSw

Finca La Isla

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2021, 12:34:14 PM »
I know that durian can be cleft grafted, Iíve done it and Iíve seen it done commercially.  Although, when I was at Excalibur nursery in Florida they were approach grafting.
For me, grafting durian is easier than Jakfruit or champedek.  But in the beginning I had issues with durian grafting until I got control of lots of details.  With Jakfruit Iím still stuck where I was with durian before.
Many people plant Jakfruit seedlings since they will generally come into production quicker than grafted trees.  But you have to graft to be assured of fruit quality. 
I remember seeing a YouTube video made by Richard Campbell about grafting Jakfruit.  I tried that method a few times and wasnít happy with it but the details of selecting the scions at the right time and being sure that the rootstock is at a vigorous moment play an important part in your success.
Peter

shaneatwell

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2021, 01:02:49 PM »
Grafted gold nugget on an in ground seedling early may (donor tree from scottsurf). Offset cleft graft. Scion wrapped in parafilm. Joint wrapped with rubber band. All protected with foil for couple months. Put on two feet of growth plus three longish side branches. Similar graft on a potted seedling failed.
 




Shane

Finca La Isla

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2021, 02:01:21 PM »
Nice Shane,  when you make the offset cleft do you leave the root stick top intact or do you cut it back?
Thanks, Peter

shaneatwell

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2021, 02:19:23 PM »
Not quite sure what you mean but it's just a straight cut across the top.
Shane

JoshuaTilaranCR

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2021, 02:30:11 PM »
This might be a good thread to ask a question I have about this! I have a jackfruit in ground growing extremely well. I got what I'm pretty sure was a ChempeJack a while back and planted the seeds. They're all coming up and I was hoping to take the strongest one and do an approach graft onto the jackfruit since I want this tree but I don't have enough space to have both. Is this a good idea or will it not work out the way I'm hoping it does?

I'm thinking of trying to have most of the tree jackfruit and a smaller trunk as the ChempeJack.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2021, 06:22:26 PM »
Shane, the question is when do you make that cut, at the time that you do the graft, or after you are sure the graft is successful?
Thanks

Finca La Isla

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2021, 06:25:51 PM »
Joshua, thatís the reverse of what most approach grafts are trying to accomplish but it should work well. I often use champejak seeds for rootstock as they grow well and are compatible with both jak and champedek.
Saludos

cbss_daviefl

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2021, 09:52:04 PM »
Yes, I have done this successfully.

Do you think it really works?
https://youtu.be/DU2E7yPViSw


Shane's graft is just like a regular cleft graft. The top of the rootstock is removed, a vertical cut is made down the rootstock, and the wedge shaped scion is placed in the vertical cut of the rootstock with cambium of both aligned.  Since the sizes do not match, the scion is offset to align the cambium on only one side.

Shane, the question is when do you make that cut, at the time that you do the graft, or after you are sure the graft is successful?
Thanks

When I graft jak, I keep my expectations of success low and occasionally I am surprised with a decent take rate.
Brandon

Forester

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2021, 11:17:29 PM »
Guys, I repeat my question, how difficult is it to root jackfruit/artocarpus and durio cuttings?

Finca La Isla

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2021, 08:15:13 AM »
As with the durian I am grafting on very young material. Both the rootstock and the scion are very tender. Mostly I use grafting clips as the very green material can get damaged or pulled this way and that while wrapping conventionaly.
Peter

shaneatwell

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2021, 01:37:45 PM »
I did my graft as cbss describes, i.e. rootstock cut and split and scion inserted. No more cutting after that just some cautious unwrapping.
Shane

JoshuaTilaranCR

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2021, 02:59:20 PM »
Joshua, thatís the reverse of what most approach grafts are trying to accomplish but it should work well. I often use champejak seeds for rootstock as they grow well and are compatible with both jak and champedek.
Saludos

A reverse approach graft then? Haha. I saw someone doing those grafts to take a scion off a bigger tree and it dawned on me that I could do it to put a scion onto the tree too. Hopefully it'll work, I won't be doing it any time soon though. Dry season is starting and the winds are already picking up.

kh0110

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2021, 09:48:45 PM »
I believe OP's question was how to graft with all the latex flowing and not really what kind of graft used.

I've watched a videao of jackfruit grafting and there was NO latex at all. That reminded me of my figs. When they are dormant and I cut them to get cuttings or remove leaves, there is MO latex. So, I bet the graft on the video was done when the jackfruit tree was somewhat dormant.
Thera

ben mango

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2021, 06:58:52 AM »
Well as you can see it turned into a discussion of all things jackfruit grafting. Has nothing to do with the plant being dormant. When I grafted cempejaks before there was no latex either and the trees were definitely not dormant. They donít even go dormant in the tropics.

sunny

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2021, 07:04:42 AM »
Approach grafting works on jackfruit and isn't that hard...do it quick but there will be flowing latex anyway.

It worked for me and in Thailand all jackfruit tree's are approach grafted before being sold. Same goes for durian.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2021, 08:54:36 PM »
Sergey, we air layer breadfruit easily but itís not the same with the other artocarpus.  We feel stuck with grafting for asexual propagation.

The issue of latex always comes up in these discussions.  I donít think it is the problem.  As Ben said there is no dormant period in the tropics.  The latex can be ignored or you can wipe or wash it away.
Peter

kh0110

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Re: Jackfruit grafting question
« Reply #24 on: November 28, 2021, 01:55:06 AM »
Good point on plant dormancy and the tropics. But maybe potted jackfruit could be somewhat induced to a semblant of dormancy by reducing daylight, increasing darkness and reducing water? That might reduce the amount of latex. We know weed growers play with these variables to induce flowering.

Then again, I agree that by just wiping away the latex would allow any graft type to be performed successfully. That's what I do when I graft figs when they're not dormant.
Thera

 

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