Author Topic: Fertilizer and other increases. How is it affecting you how are U adapting?  (Read 1249 times)

JR561

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Last year I bought it cheap stacked it deep.

Good for a long time.

Galatians522

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I have been looking into nitrogen fixing legumes. The best I have found so far is Jack bean. It can fix between 167 and 205 lbs of nitrogen per acre in a year's time. That would be enough to meet the nitrogen needs of most plants. It also has a large root system that does a great job scavenging potassium and phosphorus and requires very little water. Unlike many other legumes, it does not seem to be very paletable to deer. After nibbling a few new sprouts they have left them alone.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2022, 12:00:39 AM by Galatians522 »

spaugh

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Last year I bought it cheap stacked it deep.

Good for a long time.

Smart man
Brad Spaugh

Galatians522

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A couple random thoughts on soil fertility as it impacts fertilizer needs.

According to the University of Nebraska each percentage point of soil organic matter can contribute about 20lbs of nitrogen per acre through the natural mineralization process.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://water.unl.edu/documents/Section%2520F.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiUyrvVx9v3AhVuRjABHezZDmgQFnoECAQQBg&usg=AOvVaw07GpBtuzRLpUcT2pMXl6fW

Also, earthworm castings will have close to 1% available nitrogen even when they are fed with high carbon feed stock like paper--this greatly surprised me.

As a result of all this, I conclude that a plant's nitrogen needs can be reduced over the long term through heavy applications of mulch (which can sometimes be obtained for free). However, in the short term there may be a deficite as the high carbon mulch will absorb available nitrogen.



« Last Edit: May 13, 2022, 12:01:32 AM by Galatians522 »

RodneyS

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A couple random thoughts on soil fertility as it impacts fertilizer needs.

According to the University of Nebraska each percentage point of soil organic matter can contribute about 20lbs of nitrogen per acre through the natural mineralization process.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://water.unl.edu/documents/Section%2520F.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiUyrvVx9v3AhVuRjABHezZDmgQFnoECAQQBg&usg=AOvVaw07GpBtuzRLpUcT2pMXl6fW

Also, earthworm castings will have close to 1% available nitrogen even when they are fed with high carbon feed stock like paper--this greatly surprised me.

As a result of all this, I conclude that a plant's nitrogen needs can be reduced over the long term through heavy applications of mulch (which can sometimes be obtained for free). However, in the short term there may be a deficite as the high carbon mulch will absorb available nitrogen.

Worms & compost, easy & highly beneficial.  If micronutrients are a concern, then investing in some kelp meal would be a good thing

Lovetoplant

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Once retired when the eggs stop, they continue to take care of the slugs, snails, most bugs, low hanging grapes and unprotected vegetables, and provide the compost material. Living the good life. They do seem to start acting like dogs a bit as they age, in other ways like kids... freeloaders. :)  Sadly,  a couple if them died of old age earlier this year, lasting 7 and 10 years hence the remaining grumpy 10+ year old and new youngsters. Cheaper and easier pets than dogs plus fresh eggs again after a dry spell.

Regarding predators,  raccoons,  their coop is built like fort Knox,  hardware cloth all the way around except for siding and doors, asphalt singled roof like a normal house, concrete filled cinder blocks a foot deep for perimeter to fasten down the walls with j hooks, 6 inches of tampered gravel topped with sand (good enough for pavers). Nice run and space under the coop. Plenty of room to keep 4 or 5 birds if i don't want to let them out or am away as its designed for 12, just have to make sure there's enough food and water.



What will you do to the hens whose not laying any more eggs?  Giving them away?

Surprise they live a very long life.  Thanks for the infos

johnnyv

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I hardly use any fertilizer these days except for aluminum free acid fertilizer for my blueberries, American paw paws and jaboticaba.
Basically everything else just gets chicken and sheep manure, compost and wood chip mulch.
Oh and I constantly have to chop and drop the inga beans which is a nitrogen fixer and grows like a weed.

 

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