Author Topic: My Breadfruit  (Read 16996 times)

murahilin

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #25 on: March 16, 2012, 10:18:51 PM »
Nice pics Noel.

The furthest North I've heard of a breadfruit fruiting was on Manalapan in Palm Beach County. Not sure if that tree is still alive. I'll have to find out.

Warren, we should start growth trials of all the breadfruit varieties we can get our hands on to find a more cold hardy variety. USDA in Hawaii has a bunch of cultivars and if we all request different budwood we could build up a massive collection. Who's in?

Fruitguy

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2012, 10:49:08 PM »

Warren, if it said "Panapen" on the label, I would bet that it is Artocarpus altilis but there is no 100% guarantee. I can ask the folks at Eneida for you!
NR           

Your confirmation and the fact that the label itself said Artocarpus altilis leaves me feeling confident I got the one I want.  Thanks! :)

Fruitguy

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #27 on: March 16, 2012, 10:50:02 PM »
Warren, we should start growth trials of all the breadfruit varieties we can get our hands on to find a more cold hardy variety. USDA in Hawaii has a bunch of cultivars and if we all request different budwood we could build up a massive collection. Who's in?

I'm in, but where did you intend to plant our breadfruit forest???

murahilin

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #28 on: March 16, 2012, 10:59:42 PM »
I'm in, but where did you intend to plant our breadfruit forest???

We will figure that out later... Right now we just focus on acquiring breadfruit.

Anyone have a few spare acres they are willing to loan out to the largest selection of breadfruit cultivars ever grown in South Florida?

Fruitguy

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #29 on: March 16, 2012, 11:04:06 PM »
Fruitguy, congrats on the impulse buy. They are beautiful trees. I was astounded at the beautiful towering ones when I visited Jamaica. I hope it survives!

Thanks BluePalm, but I think it was Sleepdoc that mention the impulse buy (and he got the named variety!).  Truth be told, mine was somewhat of an impulse buy as well, though I did hope to find grafted breadfruit available at Eneida's.  It probably would be a lot larger now if it didn't take the Post Office a full week to send my "Priority" box to Miami.  Apparently shipping Priority means nothing if your box is too big to fit on some Postman's cart somewhere, which is how my local guy explained how my box took a week from PR when others in much more distant locations (and smaller boxes) got their's in 3 days on average.  So the lesson learned is either ship Express Mail or choose the absolutely smallest box possible.  I had the larger box because I had some 4 foot nutmeg trees that I sent back.  Those were even bent in the box, but knowing what I know now, I will cut them back next time.  They appeared to survive the week of darkness but never put out a flush and slowly (painstaking to watch) died back to nothing.

I really have no cold protection plan .... I know there is a very, very high chance that it will not survive the winter.  But the tree just looked so cool I had to buy it anyway.  Very much an impulse buy, but hey, you never know right?




fruitlovers

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2012, 11:04:47 PM »
Warren, are you sure that is really breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) and not breadnut (Artocarpus camansi)? Where in PR did you get it? Unfortunately a lot of the folks in PR don't seem to get that there is a BIG difference and call both of them breadfruit. But both are very different fruts. The leaves on your plant look to me like camansi. The good news is that camansi is easier to grow i think.
Oscar

Oscar
I lived in Puerto Rico for years and seedless Breadfruit is always called "Panapen" or "Pana".  Seeded breadfruit is called "Pana de Pepitas". which means Breadfruit with seeds. I have never heard anyone call seeded breadfruit as "panapen".  This fruit is very popular all over the island and people know the difference.  Islanders mostly eat unseeded breadfruit and the unpopular seeded one is mostly fed to animals!

Warren, if it said "Panapen" on the label, I would bet that it is Artocarpus altilis but there is no 100% guarantee. I can ask the folks at Eneida for you!
NR     

     

Problem is that Puerto Ricans often refer to both of these fruits simply as "pana". Also the full common name in Puerto Rico is confusing. Panapen means breadfruit with seed. But the camansi is not a breadfruit with seed, it is a totally different fruit. Here we do have breadfruit with seeds, that is Artocarpus altilis that have some seeds in them. It is better to call the camansi by that name "camansi". That is the name used here by Filipinos for that fruit. I noticed this same confusion even in articles in CRFG Fruit Gardener magazine. This lady Bev who did the 3 part article on PR, in her first article she has a photo of an immature fruit hanging on the tree which she calls a breadfruit, and has it labeled as A. altilis, but that photo was clearly A. camansi. I meant to write in to point out that error, but never got around to it. But i noticed that nobody else picked up on that big mistake either.
The Jardines Eneida nursery is a good nursery and they probably have the plant Warren got labeled correctly. Most breadfruit types don't have that type of leaf he showed, very narrow and thin, that is usually indicates it is camansi. But some very few breadfruit types have immature leaves that look like that. If that plant's leaves get wider and less indented as it matures then can be sure it is breadfruit. if not it is a camansi.
So what is the big difference? Breadfruit has a lot of 100% edible pulp inside. The camansi is almost 100% seed inside when it is mature. If you want to eat some pulp you have to pick it very immature. Only Filipino people bother to eat camansi here.
You can see a photo comparing camansi on left and breadfruit on right:

Unfortunately don't have a photo comparing the difference in shape of the leaves of the two species right now or you could see what i mean.
Oscar

Oscar

fruitlovers

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #31 on: March 16, 2012, 11:19:54 PM »
Problem is that Puerto Ricans often refer to both of these fruits simply as "pana". Also the full common name in Puerto Rico is confusing. Panapen means breadfruit with seed. But the camansi is not a breadfruit with seed, it is a totally different fruit. Here we do have breadfruit with seeds, that is Artocarpus altilis that have some seeds in them. It is better to call the camansi by that name "camansi". That is the name used here by Filipinos for that fruit. I noticed this same confusion even in articles in CRFG Fruit Gardener magazine. This lady Bev who did the 3 part article on PR, in her first article she has a photo of an immature fruit hanging on the tree which she calls a breadfruit, and has it labeled as A. altilis, but that photo was clearly A. camansi. I meant to write in to point out that error, but never got around to it. But i noticed that nobody else picked up on that big mistake either.
The Jardines Eneida nursery is a good nursery and they probably have the plant Warren got labeled correctly. Most breadfruit types don't have that type of leaf he showed, very narrow and thin, that is usually indicates it is camansi. But some very few breadfruit types have immature leaves that look like that. If that plant's leaves get wider and less indented as it matures then can be sure it is breadfruit. if not it is a camansi.
So what is the big difference? Breadfruit has a lot of 100% edible pulp inside. The camansi is almost 100% seed inside when it is mature. If you want to eat some pulp you have to pick it very immature. Only Filipino people bother to eat camansi here.
You can see a photo comparing camansi on left and breadfruit on right:

Unfortunately don't have a photo comparing the difference in shape of the leaves of the two species right now or you could see what i mean.
Oscar
Oscar

murahilin

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #32 on: March 16, 2012, 11:26:35 PM »
On a somewhat unrelated note, A. camansi is known as chataigne in Trinidad.

Also, I read that A. altilis is a natural cross between A. camansi and A. mariannensis. It was in one of Dr. Ragone's powerpoint presentations that are available online.

fruitlovers

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #33 on: March 16, 2012, 11:36:54 PM »
On a somewhat unrelated note, A. camansi is known as chataigne in Trinidad.

Also, I read that A. altilis is a natural cross between A. camansi and A. mariannensis. It was in one of Dr. Ragone's powerpoint presentations that are available online.

Close, but not quite correct. The A. camansi is considered to be the main ancient ancestor of the breadfruit. In the Micronesian islands some breadfruits also have ancestry of A. mariannensis.
Oscar
Oscar

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #34 on: March 17, 2012, 09:20:58 AM »
Warren, are you sure that is really breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) and not breadnut (Artocarpus camansi)? Where in PR did you get it? Unfortunately a lot of the folks in PR don't seem to get that there is a BIG difference and call both of them breadfruit. But both are very different fruts. The leaves on your plant look to me like camansi. The good news is that camansi is easier to grow i think.
Oscar

Oscar
I lived in Puerto Rico for years and seedless Breadfruit is always called "Panapen" or "Pana".  Seeded breadfruit is called "Pana de Pepitas". which means Breadfruit with seeds. I have never heard anyone call seeded breadfruit as "panapen".  This fruit is very popular all over the island and people know the difference.  Islanders mostly eat unseeded breadfruit and the unpopular seeded one is mostly fed to animals!

Warren, if it said "Panapen" on the label, I would bet that it is Artocarpus altilis but there is no 100% guarantee. I can ask the folks at Eneida for you!
NR     

     

Problem is that Puerto Ricans often refer to both of these fruits simply as "pana". Also the full common name in Puerto Rico is confusing. Panapen means breadfruit with seed. But the camansi is not a breadfruit with seed, it is a totally different fruit. Here we do have breadfruit with seeds, that is Artocarpus altilis that have some seeds in them. It is better to call the camansi by that name "camansi". That is the name used here by Filipinos for that fruit. I noticed this same confusion even in articles in CRFG Fruit Gardener magazine. This lady Bev who did the 3 part article on PR, in her first article she has a photo of an immature fruit hanging on the tree which she calls a breadfruit, and has it labeled as A. altilis, but that photo was clearly A. camansi. I meant to write in to point out that error, but never got around to it. But i noticed that nobody else picked up on that big mistake either.
The Jardines Eneida nursery is a good nursery and they probably have the plant Warren got labeled correctly. Most breadfruit types don't have that type of leaf he showed, very narrow and thin, that is usually indicates it is camansi. But some very few breadfruit types have immature leaves that look like that. If that plant's leaves get wider and less indented as it matures then can be sure it is breadfruit. if not it is a camansi.
So what is the big difference? Breadfruit has a lot of 100% edible pulp inside. The camansi is almost 100% seed inside when it is mature. If you want to eat some pulp you have to pick it very immature. Only Filipino people bother to eat camansi here.
You can see a photo comparing camansi on left and breadfruit on right:

Unfortunately don't have a photo comparing the difference in shape of the leaves of the two species right now or you could see what i mean.
Oscar

Oscar
I totally disagree that "panapen" means seeded breadfruit. How many years did you live in PR?  Panapen means the unseeded breadfruit (A.altilis) to Boricuas (PR islanders).  Pana de Pepitas is the SEEDED type.  Not sure where you are getting your information but it's wrong.
FGM   

     

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: My Breadfruit
« Reply #35 on: March 17, 2012, 04:32:40 PM »
Sorry, that is what i meant. Pana de pepitas is what i meant. That means seeded breadfruit.  Gist of what i was saying is exactly the same. The camansi is NOT a seeded breadfruit. There is also a confusion in english when camansi is called breadnut, which can also refer to another fruit Brosiminum alicastrum. BTW, i never lived in PR. Did visit there for a couple of weeks, that is all.
Breadfruit is a relatively new fruit to PR and Caribbean area. Only few hundred years and was introduced from Tahiti. Breadfruit has been bread, grown and eaten here for  millenia.
Oscar
Oscar