Author Topic: Pintangatuba pollination  (Read 3261 times)

socalbalcony

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #25 on: August 12, 2021, 11:09:38 AM »
I have a 3ft tall 3gal all by it's lonesome in a greenhouse. Put on at least 50 flowers. Ended up with about 10 fruits through hand pollination. Not the best ratio, but it is possible to fruit alone. Did better than I expected considering this is it's first real fruiting. Your problem just could just be maturity. 2ft is pretty small. Unless you like really sour fruit, I would give the plant another year or two to produce before buying another one. But I enjoy them and I think another plant would help production. So any of you in SoCal who aren't fans of the fruit and want to trade theirs for something, let me know.

This was my first real try of this fruit. Sour and slightly sweet with a tropical candy-like after taste. I really liked it. I can eat lemons raw, so sour doesn't bother me at all. Should make a great juice too. 
 


Maturity is sometimes the problem but often it just boils down to genetics of being self-fertile, there is literally research suggesting that they aren't self-fertile.. that proves what happens with a small sample-set. I had a 4ft one and it wasn't self-fertile. If you had another one you would have way better fruit-set than 10/50

NateTheGreat

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #26 on: August 13, 2021, 01:09:37 PM »
The one in a pot dropped half green, but the in-ground one held until half orange half yellow. If yours are dropping early I'm guessing it's inconsistent watering. The pot was dry when the underripe one dropped for me.

Underripe: okay, was expecting super sour, but it wasn't. Reminded me of a lemon peel, or kale. Surprisingly stringy. Heavy on some kind of grassy/earthy flavor.

The ripe one was much better. It smelled like corned beef. Sourness about that of an orange, with plenty of sweetness. More sweet than sour. It tasted a bit like tropical punch mixed with tang/orangina/meyer lemon. Not exploding with juice like I was expecting, and the fruit didn't fall apart after taking a bite. The stringyness was unexpected, but not a bad thing. Grassy/earthy flavor basically gone. Eager to try some more of these. I've heard pitangatubas are very fast from flower to fruit, I think I've heard 3 weeks. These took around 5 1/2 weeks as best I can tell.



K-Rimes

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2021, 08:55:41 PM »
I'm finding that leaving them on the counter for 12, 24, or even 36 hours really turns up the sweetness. The last one I left for 36 hours and it was sweet in the pulp but sour in the juice, but overall, well balanced from my tree. I think mimosa and champa have some nice plants with decent genetic lineage. Both of mine are very edible and I look forward to them.

just.jim

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2021, 09:10:22 PM »
I think I misunderstood time frame from flower to fruit.  I see a fair amount of fruit on my first tree, flowers gone for 2 or 3 weeks.  I even have a ton of new buds coming on that plant, too.  It is the third budding since April I think. 

Finca Loco

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #29 on: August 24, 2021, 08:29:56 PM »
I had one in the ground (about the size of a full 3 gallon plant) it flowered for a year, but never set fruit. I also thought it was a pollination issue, so I bought a second 3 gallon, put it the ground right next to the first one. Year 2 and the 1st one is not a 5-7 gallon plant and makes plenty of fruit, the smaller one has some fruit, but much less. I think you need a 5-7 gallon plant, or at least a 4-5 year old for consistent fruit set.

I just just cut off a successful air layer of the first plant today, it has been flowering/fruiting since spring. It's in a 3 gallon, but will need to grow into it. PM if anyone is interested.

brian

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #30 on: August 24, 2021, 09:38:39 PM »
I have three in 1gal pots, and thet have all been fruiting consistently (few fruits at a time).  I don't think they need to be large

socalbalcony

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #31 on: August 25, 2021, 01:21:28 AM »
I had one in the ground (about the size of a full 3 gallon plant) it flowered for a year, but never set fruit. I also thought it was a pollination issue, so I bought a second 3 gallon, put it the ground right next to the first one. Year 2 and the 1st one is not a 5-7 gallon plant and makes plenty of fruit, the smaller one has some fruit, but much less. I think you need a 5-7 gallon plant, or at least a 4-5 year old for consistent fruit set.

I just just cut off a successful air layer of the first plant today, it has been flowering/fruiting since spring. It's in a 3 gallon, but will need to grow into it. PM if anyone is interested.

That is awesome, I know airlayers and cuttings can be done but I haven't had luck.. care to share the details of what you did/hormones/medium/time span etc?

looking fwd to it

Epicatt2

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #32 on: August 25, 2021, 02:43:50 AM »
What, how much, and how often, should we be feeding our pintangtubas to encourage them to bloom and set & hold fruit?

Paul M.
==

noochka1

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #33 on: August 25, 2021, 10:48:09 AM »
I've had 4 bushes growing for 7 years.  They are all 3-4 ft tall.  They all bloom regularly, but don't set any fruit.  They are pretty bushes, but a complete waste of space if the goal is fruit production.

socalbalcony

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #34 on: August 26, 2021, 03:18:56 PM »
I've had 4 bushes growing for 7 years.  They are all 3-4 ft tall.  They all bloom regularly, but don't set any fruit.  They are pretty bushes, but a complete waste of space if the goal is fruit production.

Are they close together in proximity? Unless they are severely dehydrated I am very surprised to hear they aren't setting fruit..

socalbalcony

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #35 on: August 26, 2021, 03:21:15 PM »
What, how much, and how often, should we be feeding our pintangtubas to encourage them to bloom and set & hold fruit?

Paul M.
==

I believe Adam likes using hollytone and sometimes chelated iron if needed, older plants can be heavier feeders, rain/water seems to help w/flowering. Setting fruit as stated earlier depends on good genetics and or cross pollination ..

Finca Loco

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #36 on: August 26, 2021, 09:37:13 PM »
I had one in the ground (about the size of a full 3 gallon plant) it flowered for a year, but never set fruit. I also thought it was a pollination issue, so I bought a second 3 gallon, put it the ground right next to the first one. Year 2 and the 1st one is not a 5-7 gallon plant and makes plenty of fruit, the smaller one has some fruit, but much less. I think you need a 5-7 gallon plant, or at least a 4-5 year old for consistent fruit set.

I just just cut off a successful air layer of the first plant today, it has been flowering/fruiting since spring. It's in a 3 gallon, but will need to grow into it. PM if anyone is interested.

That is awesome, I know airlayers and cuttings can be done but I haven't had luck.. care to share the details of what you did/hormones/medium/time span etc?

looking fwd to it

I used plain spagnum moss, no hormones. Started in early june and was just now ready for the chop, so about 3 months. I did 3 total air layers but only got 1 to take. 

Finca Loco

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #37 on: August 26, 2021, 09:38:31 PM »
2x post

socalbalcony

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #38 on: August 27, 2021, 01:01:48 AM »
I had one in the ground (about the size of a full 3 gallon plant) it flowered for a year, but never set fruit. I also thought it was a pollination issue, so I bought a second 3 gallon, put it the ground right next to the first one. Year 2 and the 1st one is not a 5-7 gallon plant and makes plenty of fruit, the smaller one has some fruit, but much less. I think you need a 5-7 gallon plant, or at least a 4-5 year old for consistent fruit set.

I just just cut off a successful air layer of the first plant today, it has been flowering/fruiting since spring. It's in a 3 gallon, but will need to grow into it. PM if anyone is interested.

That is awesome, I know airlayers and cuttings can be done but I haven't had luck.. care to share the details of what you did/hormones/medium/time span etc?

looking fwd to it

I used plain spagnum moss, no hormones. Started in early june and was just now ready for the chop, so about 3 months. I did 3 total air layers but only got 1 to take.

That's sweet!! Any other details, like the thickness of the branch you had success with? Were all the layers done on the same thickness or were there other factors as to why they perhaps failed.. also, did the branches you attempt to layer bloom more profusely?

Post a pic if you can, I've never seen proof of one (I believe you though). Seems like uniflora is more difficult to layer

just.jim

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #39 on: August 27, 2021, 10:34:53 AM »
I have dozens of fruit growing, maybe up to 3/8 of an inch, and now another ton of flowers opening on the same plant.  Is this normal?  No fertilizing or anything special, just solid watering every other day.  Conejo Valley here and it is pretty dry although more humid than usual, 55-60% some days with strong sun.

I talked with a mixologist at a local Italian restaurant.  He is going to figure out a good cocktail using them, thinks the tangy tartness will make a good drink. 

brian

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Re: Pintangatuba pollination
« Reply #40 on: August 27, 2021, 11:21:28 AM »
Yeah mine are constantly flowering and fruiting, though only a few flowers & fruits at a time.

 

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