Author Topic: Question for Tropical Fruit Tree Doctors  (Read 495 times)

jorge_cima

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Question for Tropical Fruit Tree Doctors
« on: March 02, 2023, 11:17:17 PM »
I have two Achachairu trees that were planted in January of 2017. I am hopeful they will bloom within the next two to three years. 

Although both appear healthy and are growing rather nicely, one of them has two problems I was hoping someone here could tell me if they will affect fruiting when the time comes.

About 3 years ago, the main tip of one of my trees broke off.  It now has what appears to be 2 "main tips wantabees."   Neither tip has taken over and become "the main growing tip" and the tree has actually grown sideways a bit (it is about 7 to 8 feet tall.)

That same tree was also injured by a careless gardener mowing my lawn. The wound is about 3 or 4 inches from the ground and, although not completely closed, it appears to be healing and that at some point will close completely.

Can anyone here provide some insight as to how these two issues could affect  fruit production on these trees?

Thank You.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2023, 12:53:54 AM by jorge_cima »

cbss_daviefl

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Re: Question for Tropical Fruit Tree Doctors
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2023, 07:34:22 AM »
Neither should be harmful long-term.  Continue to keep an eye on the wound and keep the base of the tree weeded so the wound dries quickly after rain or irrigation. If you are spraying you mangos with a fungicide,  you can spray the wound too as added insurance.

I hope you get fruit soon. My first tree fruited at 12ft tall and wide. Still waiting on others that are smaller.
Brandon

jorge_cima

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Re: Question for Tropical Fruit Tree Doctors
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2023, 08:42:21 PM »
Neither should be harmful long-term.  Continue to keep an eye on the wound and keep the base of the tree weeded so the wound dries quickly after rain or irrigation. If you are spraying you mangos with a fungicide,  you can spray the wound too as added insurance.

I hope you get fruit soon. My first tree fruited at 12ft tall and wide. Still waiting on others that are smaller.

Thank you so much for your feedback.  Do you recall how long it took for your fruiting tree to reach 12 ft tall?  I hear different numbers regarding the time to bloom on these trees.  The sales ladies at Pine Island Nursery on Eureka (about 2 miles from me) told me their trees fruited at around 7-8 feet tall.   I'll be darn if mine are not really close to 8 feet tall.  They were planted in 2017 and I fertilize with 8-3-9 in the summer (about once a month or so) and 0-3-16 (no nitrogen) in the winter.  I also use foliar sprays and chelated iron occasionally.

cbss_daviefl

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Re: Question for Tropical Fruit Tree Doctors
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2023, 11:10:18 PM »
My fruiting tree was purchased from montoso gardens in PR in 2013.  It wa s 2ft tall in a 3gal pot. I potted it up to a 7gal and planted it in the ground in 2014. It did not do well in the spot I planted it because it was too windy. After years, it became acclimated and  started growing at a better pace. It fruited for the first time last year, 6 fruit. Right now, there are over 100 flowers on the tree, most of which I hope should mature into edible fruit.

Last year I planted some small tress in a wind sheltered area and they are growing fast and always seem to have new leaves. I was gifted a selecto seedling that was two trees from the same seed. When I planted them, one was 3ft and the other was just over a foot. As of now, the former runt is only a few inches shorter, growing over 3ft in a year. In 2020, I planted some that were in 20gal pots. One is now 9ft and the other over 10 but they have not flowered yet. I have seen much smaller trees with fruit and your 8ft trees are big enough to flower now if they are willing.
Brandon

jorge_cima

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Re: Question for Tropical Fruit Tree Doctors
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2023, 01:17:37 AM »
My fruiting tree was purchased from montoso gardens in PR in 2013.  It wa s 2ft tall in a 3gal pot. I potted it up to a 7gal and planted it in the ground in 2014. It did not do well in the spot I planted it because it was too windy. After years, it became acclimated and  started growing at a better pace. It fruited for the first time last year, 6 fruit. Right now, there are over 100 flowers on the tree, most of which I hope should mature into edible fruit.

Last year I planted some small tress in a wind sheltered area and they are growing fast and always seem to have new leaves. I was gifted a selecto seedling that was two trees from the same seed. When I planted them, one was 3ft and the other was just over a foot. As of now, the former runt is only a few inches shorter, growing over 3ft in a year. In 2020, I planted some that were in 20gal pots. One is now 9ft and the other over 10 but they have not flowered yet. I have seen much smaller trees with fruit and your 8ft trees are big enough to flower now if they are willing.

Amazing!  Mine have been in the ground since 2017 and they are now about 8 to 9 ft tall.  I bought mine from Hawaii in three gallon pots.   They had serious issues with burnt leaves when they were small, but both appear to be acclimated now.  Using zero nitrogen fertilizer in the winter appears to have helped.  Both trees flushed new growth last week and I will revert to 8-3-9 by the end of the month. They look "like we are getting close" to blooming lets... see.  Anyway, I do appreciate the information.  Thanks!!!


 

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