Citrus > Cold Hardy Citrus

Can citrus survive winter without sunlight?

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hardyvermont:

--- Quote from: Perplexed on June 27, 2021, 05:38:14 PM ---Question. Cause I have some citrus seedlings germinated around March and I might put them under a tree in total shade so they don't receive any winter sun. Thoughts?

--- End quote ---

In the old forum someone posted about how they had kept plants in total dark and cold for several weeks before they started to lose leaves.  The plants tested were larger than yours.  The evidence goes against our belief system that citrus plants always require sunshine.



Specifically for you, plants kept in shade would benefit from not drying out if there is a long period of freezing sunny weather.

850FL:
10F minimum?! Pretty cold.. snow too? If you’re growing cold hardy varieties they probably have more dormancy in their genes.I have a calamondin in 90+% shade and it’s been growing a few years with bamboo roots very close and hanging on surprisingly well (slower growth and no fruit ever lol). A few navel oranges like that too, they’re all grafted saplings. I do have various seedlings mostly small that have been very shaded for 1-2 years and they hang on quite well (low percent dieoff) even under Deep shade and colder winters. But I do chop back the canopy every so often (many months between)

Perplexed:
No I mean 10F minimum as in the cold hardy zone. I've never experienced 10F yet so far..

Gotamas:

--- Quote from: hardyvermont on June 28, 2021, 02:52:29 PM ---
--- Quote from: Perplexed on June 27, 2021, 05:38:14 PM ---Question. Cause I have some citrus seedlings germinated around March and I might put them under a tree in total shade so they don't receive any winter sun. Thoughts?

--- End quote ---

In the old forum someone posted about how they had kept plants in total dark and cold for several weeks before they started to lose leaves.  The plants tested were larger than yours.  The evidence goes against our belief system that citrus plants always require sunshine.



Specifically for you, plants kept in shade would benefit from not drying out if there is a long period of freezing sunny weather.

--- End quote ---

Can you give me more information on this. I am trying to do some testing of my own but if it's already been done, I would be grateful to read such a thing.

Thanks.

Plantinyum:
I overwinter my citrus in a basement here in zone 7 .
Its has a upper and a lower warmer section. The plants stay in the upper one, next to a very small window which lets some light in, they stay there  if the temps outside are not low enough to start to freeze inside.. When its colder and the walls , glass and plant pots start having ice crystals ,I lower them in the lower section and close a wooden door which traps the heat in. This past winter they stayed there in total darkness for about half a month, maybe more, but it was not an block of time.
I had small cumquat seedlings overwinter fine in those conditions, thought I think sor seedlings they should have their growth been hardened.
I think under your trees they will get light, just not direct light. Thats different from no light conditions of overwintering. U should follow the temp swings that happen and depending of the variety of the seedlings ,take them in a place without heat, thought above freezing , for the coolest of weather.

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