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Messages - greg_D

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Ribbed pink guava from SoCal farmers market. Looked like they were selling a mix of fruit from different seedling trees. Grown on a farm in San Diego. 1.5 inch diameter, very fragrant, standard tropical guava taste. Oddly round, like a ball. The ribs are physical depressions in the fruit, six per fruit, equally spaced. Like a star pattern. If you've ever seen a Korean melon these look like tiny round versions of one of those.











2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia subamplexicaulis
« on: October 12, 2023, 11:17:14 PM »
Ended up ordering three seeds, arrived today, all with roots. Which is great because the closely related araca boi is apparently very reluctant to germinate unless it's sown very fresh. That info made me worry these would be similar (maybe they are and have just been packed very well from the start). If they all survive to become seedlings I'm gonna donate two of them to botanic gardens in the area and keep the third.

Roots are surprisingly long given that nothing else has popped out of the seeds yet besides roots. Seeds are marble sized (but not spherical, rather somewhat flattened) so lots of stored energy, so I'm just growing in damp vermiculite to avoid fungal issues. Cut the top off some clear plastic single use plastic water bottles and cut a drainage hole in each, using them as containers. Figure that way I can check for root growth in case they just fill the whole thing up with roots before sending anything out above ground.

3
If you haven't like this fruit, make sure you've tried it completely ripe!

I've noticed that if strawberry guava (Psidium cattleyanum) is picked when the fruit is a uniform deep purple, almost black, it tastes nearly exactly like a very good strawberry, both in terms of what it tastes like and how intense the taste is. At this stage they'll fall off the tree if you barely touch the fruit. They're also very vulnerable to fruit flies at this level of ripeness. I'm assuming cheese cloth bagging would be sufficient to prevent infection; you could check for fallen fruit inside the bags without having to open them. Some extra work, sure, but the flavor is night and day compared to the earlier stages of ripeness so I think it's worth it.

4
I've had the popular dwarf guava cultivar that a few places sell, planted in the ground, for a few weeks now. Just received a plant in the mail from Hawaii. New cultivar, said to have been found in the jungle by a friend of the nursery owner. Leaves, fruit, flowers are proportionate.

Here's a photo of the two side-by-side. The difference is pretty incredible.



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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia subamplexicaulis
« on: October 08, 2023, 04:45:31 PM »
It is unclear to me if the person writing the question meant 'like Araca Boi, it too doesn't need hot weather' or rather 'it doesn't need hot weather, unlike araca boi which does'

Found the post and they’re saying Araçá boi needs hot weather. It’s sloppy though. Araçá boi is Amazonian so needs consistent warmth and moisture rather than heat itself. It grows great where I am but here it almost never cracks 90f. The areas he reference are high altitude southern mata Atlântica. They have cool winters but not cold for North American standards. They still have tropical summers which is always the hiccup with Mediterranean climates, and that part of the country is significantly moist.

I’m actually growing this and it’s doing extremely well here in an equatorial rainforest climate. I have it partially shaded by avocado, cacao, cupuaçu and clove nearby. It maybe gets an hour of direct sun maybe. It’s about 50cm high so still too young to know. Pitangatuba and grumixama is doing well in similar spots but pitanga bananinha is struggling for some reason (for context).

Thank you! Great info, really appreciate it

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia subamplexicaulis
« on: October 08, 2023, 01:43:59 AM »
From the comments section of a social media post by the same people who made the video I linked above, it seems like this might be well adapted to Southern California

Text below is auto translated from Portuguese.

Question: "How interesting! So this species doesn't need hot weather, like Araçá Boi? Enduring cold weathers, like the one in the South and Campos do Jordan? If yes am interested in change"

Answer: "is most likely adapted to subtropical climates, yes, both by geographical distribution and by the hard leaves (Cartacea), adapted to winds"

It is unclear to me if the person writing the question meant 'like Araca Boi, it too doesn't need hot weather' or rather 'it doesn't need hot weather, unlike araca boi which does'

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia subamplexicaulis
« on: October 08, 2023, 01:22:41 AM »
Video (turn on captions then select auto-translate) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu568H18Btw

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Eugenia subamplexicaulis
« on: October 06, 2023, 03:13:58 PM »
Just ordered a couple seeds of this from Bellamy. Seems really interesting. It's essentially being billed as a less acidic Eugenia stipitata. It was seen once, over 200 years ago, then in 2018 it was found again.

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Collection-area-and-morphology-of-Eugenia-subamplexicaulis-A-sub-montane-forest-in_fig1_338489633

https://www.bellamytrees.com/seeds/p/eugenia-subamplexicaulis-atlantic-forest-boi-ara

https://e-jardim.com.br/produto/eugenia-subamplexicaulis-araca-boi-da-mata-atlantica/

Scientific literature states that wild specimens are 3 to 4 meters tall, Brazilian website linked by Bellamy in their product description claims trees in cultivation reach 1 to 2 meters tall. That said, the species was only rediscovered in 2018, so it might be more accurate to say 'trees that are a few years old are 1 to 2 meters tall.'

Photos of its habitat suggest it probably doesn't want full sun. Hopefully can take some drought as well.

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Thanks! Good to know

10
I emailed them, and they said it's true to type, but that would be very unusual if true. The inference with fewer assumptions is that it grows something similar but not dead on the same. The online store only sells little seedlings, but the in person store has some big ones if anyone wants to try. Could probably get fruit in a year or two.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Thief Caught
« on: September 30, 2023, 08:06:08 PM »
Some of you guys are gonna go to jail over a mango lol

12
Update: they grow the ones they sell from seed. Might be possible to get an airlayer or something if you contact them directly.

13
I think people make up trade names for these varieties when they sell them in English speaking markets. I would just keep the original name to avoid future confusion.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Goldfinger banana question
« on: September 24, 2023, 06:32:31 PM »
Thank you! And thanks to everyone who replied / gave info.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Goldfinger banana question
« on: September 23, 2023, 04:19:30 PM »
Here are the plants. They're all goldfinger. Two are leaning and lashed to the wall (by the previous homeowner) but there isn't tension in the rope. On the leaning ones the peak of the fruit bunch stem is roughly 6 feet off the ground. On the upright ones it's roughly 8 or 9 feet off the ground.







16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Goldfinger banana question
« on: September 22, 2023, 08:07:23 PM »
We recently moved. Along with the new place we inherited some banana plants. Tag said goldfinger (previous homeowner kept the tag). I would like to harvest the fruit and then remove the plants (I have other stuff I want to put in the space, and a similar tasting cultivar already planted elsewhere on the property). There are four bunches in total; I've attached one picture of each.

My question: do any of these look like they'll be ripe this year? From what I've been told by local growers, I basically have through the end of October until the plants stop growing.

Of the four bunches, one obviously has no shot of ripening this year, one seems like it will probably start ripening this year, the other two I'm not sure. All of them have fruit with very clearly defined edges. Almost like triangular prisms.









17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lakatan banana
« on: September 22, 2023, 07:23:12 PM »
Here's the one from Sow Exotic. Very small as expected and advertised. Seemed healthy enough although in the picture you can see it's kind of growing at a funny angle. Was packaged very well. Expecting to have to wait two or three years for fruit given that bananas sort of go into stasis during the cold months in my climate (10b) with yearly fruit thereafter due to pups. The listing very clearly differentiated it as the Filipino lakatan so hopefully it's not the cavendish variant with the same name.


Website description:

Discover the Philippines' best-tasting banana, the Lacatan! This fast-growing banana variety brings the tropics to your home or garden, boasting glossy green leaves and golden-fleshed fruit with a sweet, aromatic burst. Take the risk and taste an adventure - the Lacatan Banana is sure to be an unforgettable experience!

The Lacatan (or Lakatan) is native to the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand. It is most similar to Grand Nain and Double Mahoi but fruits faster than both.

The Lacatan Banana offers delicious flavor and a unique texture. Enjoy its sweet and aromatic nature, or use the glossy jungle-green leaves to wrap food.  This variety offers larger fruit than the Cavendish, with a deeper, more golden flesh. Lacatan Bananas are renowned for their taste and are very popular among local growers. They grow up to 5-9 feet tall and thrive in warm climates, making them perfect for container gardens.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lakatan banana
« on: September 21, 2023, 09:38:23 PM »
Got mine via mail order from "sow exotic"

How big was it?

Has anyone who ordered from sow nursery fruited saba?

Still on its way, expecting it to be very small. Based on their website it seems like they essentially sell plugs.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lakatan banana
« on: September 20, 2023, 11:24:23 PM »
Got mine via mail order from "sow exotic"

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lakatan banana
« on: September 20, 2023, 02:21:46 PM »
Thanks guys for the replies, sorry for no response. Gonna be growing this variety now! Apparently there's two cultivars known as 'lakatan' one of which is a cavendish variant, as the replies referenced. The Filipino variety is actually a group of at least three cultivars, apparently more or less indistinguishable in terms of fruit characteristics. The Filipino variants are each from a different region; I wonder if it's the same clone and the variation is due to growing conditions / soil composition. Fingers crossed I ordered the correct one, the description matched the Filipino varieties. Mother in law hasn't had this banana variety since she moved here from the Philippines, excited to have her try some.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Thief Caught
« on: September 13, 2023, 03:32:23 PM »
Yet another perspective:

There are those who might shoot a fruit thief, but not to kill.

A shotgun loaded with rock-salt could be a memorable reminder to lay off nabbing fruit uninvited.

That actually was a not too uncommon remedy for this sort of thing some decades back.  It seemed to work.

Just sayin'

Paul M.
==
You beat me to it. That or a squirt of water from the hose. The problem is nowadays if yiu squirt someone with a hose you will get an assault charge, medical bill for the fall they took, and a lawsuit for emotional stress they suffered from getting caught and squirted while in your yard stealing from your tree😉😁😉😁😉

I'm hoping the rock salt thing was a joke but if not please absolutely do not do this lol. It's 'an eye for an eye' not 'an eye for a mulberry'

Spray them with the hose if anything, much better idea

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Thief Caught
« on: September 13, 2023, 03:27:33 PM »
Sorry this happened. I think it's definitely good to teach kids to ask permission. I don't think it makes sense to assume the kid is gonna have some sort of life of crime. Growing up I acted similarly, it's what was taught to me by example. As I finished up my teens I started to develop more empathy and compassion for others. Sometimes our parents teach us what not to be.

23
Update: just stopped by a local nursery - H&H in Long Beach - that had P lucidum of similar size with fruit on them. The ones at Exotica are in my opinion exactly the same. Each tree has many fruit of various sizes, some large, most regular or small. You could take a photo of one of the big ones and say 'look how big the fruit is!' but it would not mean the tree is the giant variety. It's normal for the subspecies for a few of the fruit to be abnormally large.

A well thinned guava will make monster size fruit compared to one that is allowed to hold all of them. Hopefully you can find what you're looking for.

Thanks man! I'm just settling for the regular version of the subspecies. Bought one from that nursery I mentioned (H&H). My partner and I closed on our first house recently. We plan to be there for decades so I've been trying to be really deliberate about the trees I plant in the ground. Hence searching for the giant variety. But at the end of the day the regular version is still a very cool tree that I feel lucky to be able to grow.

24
Update: just stopped by a local nursery - H&H in Long Beach - that had P lucidum of similar size with fruit on them. The ones at Exotica are in my opinion exactly the same. Each tree has many fruit of various sizes, some large, most regular or small. You could take a photo of one of the big ones and say 'look how big the fruit is!' but it would not mean the tree is the giant variety. It's normal for the subspecies for a few of the fruit to be abnormally large.

25
What are the characteristics that individuate Mexican cream as a variety? Is it a specific clone? Or rather a type?

There's a nursery here in Long Beach that is owned by Mexican immigrants. They have a couple very old guava trees. If memory serves, one of the two makes the sort of guavas I see for sale at the Hispanic grocery store. I'm sure they would sell you cuttings or maybe even let you set up an air layer.

The nursery is mezcala nursery, their insta handle is the name of the nursery, the owner is named Sergio.


Quote
so if anyone knows a legit reliable source for a Mexican cream
It's always at Home Depot here in CA, but I am sure someone on the forum can help you out with that if not an even better cultivar thereof. If not, I have no issues cutting a plant up on your behalf.

iv tried a few times in the trade area over the years but never got a response. id be more then willing to compensate you for your time and efforts and shipping cost for a rooted/air layered Mexican cream plant, even if its tiny, as long as its the real thing im willing to wait for it to grow. iv tried hundreds of cuttings every time iv pruned the trees and before that ordered a bunch of cuttings online and i have never been able to get a single one to root.




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