Tropical Fruit > Tropical Fruit Discussion

Growing Mango trees in Southern California

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Groovyfruit:
Hi All,
    You all have some very nice SoCal Mango trees around.  For those on this thread, I'm interested in learning more about the soil you use for your In Ground Mango trees.  In particular, I was considering the best way to plant Mango trees into the typical sandy clay that characterizes some Inland Empire or Orange County areas.   Assuming that drainage isn't too big a problem do you tend to plant in (1) straight native sandy clay,  (2) supplement with some percentage of sand / gypsum / pumice, or (3) alter the planting hole some other way?  Also, does the rootstock or variety matter in the decision of your soil choices?

Thanks Ahead.
 

Eggo:
I think most people will add a bit of organic matter and mix it with native soil to amend it. But not too much as you want the roots to not linger only where you added soil but to begin to spread out.  It's probably more important to add a layer of mulch regularly.
More importantly in California it would be the mango rootstock.  There's some good info on this in the earlier messages on this thread.  I have a 15 year old turpentine rootstock tree that is barely cracking 6 ft tall growing in clay soil and a family member of mine has one that is probably 12 years old barely 4 1/2 feet tall growing in very sandy fast draining soil.  Some have mention that the cultivar grafted on these turpentine matters and some varieties do way better.  I don't know what's in the soil/water there in Florida that makes turpentine thrive in Florida and not in California hahah.  I would recommend getting a Laverne Manila they grow very vigorously.  They are easily available at Home Depot and then graft varieties you want onto them. Sometimes Armestrong would carry a Keitt grafted onto a Manila from Laverne also.

sapote:

--- Quote from: Eggo on October 23, 2021, 05:56:18 PM ---Sorry Max I think I should rephrase what I mean by having fruits. I enjoy most of my mangos while green even if it's sweet or sour.  I will occassionally eat them ripe in a bountiful year. I grow mainly 3 varieties.  Nam Doc Mai#4 and Laverne Manila fills my months from Feb through Jun. But again very mild weather here.  NDM#4 blooms 3 sometimes 4 times a year for me but very prone to powdery mildew and fruit split for me.  Currently I have hundreds of fruitlets about 1 to 2 inch in size, they will be ready to eat green and sour around Feb.  And if left to mature, it will probably ripen in May and June.  But I start to pick them as some of our spring rains will lead to fruit splitting.  Around May and and June, the Laverne Manila produces edible green immature sour fruits that are edible even around the size of apricots. They lack a strong resin and are edible even small.  Some mangos are not edible as a green sour mango at that small size.  Those manila I dont think are any good when they develop a husky seed and ripe fruits are very aromatic but small and fibrous.  My months where I'm completely out of edible mango is Nov through Jan, ahah.  Hoping to find some local sources of other varieties, my luck with graftong shipped scions from Florida hasn't been too good.  I definitely would like to share/swap various fruits/scions.

--- End quote ---

Your fruit cycle is completely different from the norm as you pick the fruits much early and the trees provided multiple crops per year, so it will be tough for us to guess what varieties can fill your need in Nov to Jan.  I didn't know that La Verne Manila fruits have any value but I'm glad you had found the way to enjoy them. In my yard, the latest mango in the season is Lancetilla.

simon_grow:

--- Quote from: Groovyfruit on November 03, 2021, 01:33:41 AM ---Hi All,
    You all have some very nice SoCal Mango trees around.  For those on this thread, I'm interested in learning more about the soil you use for your In Ground Mango trees.  In particular, I was considering the best way to plant Mango trees into the typical sandy clay that characterizes some Inland Empire or Orange County areas.   Assuming that drainage isn't too big a problem do you tend to plant in (1) straight native sandy clay,  (2) supplement with some percentage of sand / gypsum / pumice, or (3) alter the planting hole some other way?  Also, does the rootstock or variety matter in the decision of your soil choices?

Thanks Ahead.

--- End quote ---

Sand and clay soil is very different but if you have good drainage, Iím assuming you have sandy soil.

Itís probably best to plant directly into your native soil wether itís sandy or clay. Dig a square hole with sharp corners so the roots donít circle. You can add about 25-50% or more of a good quality top soil but make sure itís just top soil and not mulch or compost. Top soil will generally add a bit of organic matter and may help sandy soil retain moisture.

Plant selection is critical and I highly recommend planting many seedlings from mono and Polyembryonic seeds/fruit. Also plant a couple Home Depot Manilla mangos and plant them directly into the soil and donít graft any of your seedlings until they have developed their scaffold branches.

Simon

Victoria Ave:
Unfortunately I came home today to find my Valencia Pride which was just starting to turn yellow the other day when I left had split on the tree. Luckily it seems to be close to ripe so I covered the split with a bandaid and put it in a paper bag with bananas hopefully I'm a few days it will have a little give and I can enjoy my first properly grown mango!

Reason for the split? I'm guessing it may well be the hot and dry Santa Ana winds we've been having. At the end of summer I switched my irrigation timer from every 4 days to every 7 going off on Sunday. I imagine the hot dry winds this week changed the ETO drastically I should have irrigated a little sooner. But if anyone has any other theories let me know





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