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Growing Mango trees in Southern California

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simon_grow:

--- Quote from: Victoria Ave on November 21, 2021, 01:41:07 PM ---Unfortunately I came home today to find my Valencia Pride which was just starting to turn yellow the other day when I left had split on the tree. Luckily it seems to be close to ripe so I covered the split with a bandaid and put it in a paper bag with bananas hopefully I'm a few days it will have a little give and I can enjoy my first properly grown mango!

Reason for the split? I'm guessing it may well be the hot and dry Santa Ana winds we've been having. At the end of summer I switched my irrigation timer from every 4 days to every 7 going off on Sunday. I imagine the hot dry winds this week changed the ETO drastically I should have irrigated a little sooner. But if anyone has any other theories let me know






--- End quote ---

Sorry for the late reply but VP is prone to splitting. Especially if soil moisture or atmospheric humidity has large swings.

Simon

simon_grow:

--- Quote from: Goyo626 on January 19, 2022, 08:41:48 AM ---Is now the time to cut off first bloom?

--- End quote ---

Allow the blooms to fully form and then cut off 1/2 to 2/3 of each panicle. If your tree is young or has weak branches, you can trim the blooms earlier in order to avoid the weight of the blooms to cause the branches to droop. This type of bloom trimming is only for young or non established trees that you donít want to fruit.

When young mango trees in colder climates blooms, the weight of the panicles causes the branches to droop to a horizontal position which exposes the cambium to the sun which in turn can lead to sunburn. If your branches are already hardened in a horizontal position, you can paint the exposed surfaces with a 50:50 mixture of white paint and water. Youíll have to look up what type of paint as I canít remember.

Simon

Goyo626:

--- Quote from: simon_grow on January 19, 2022, 05:46:16 PM ---
--- Quote from: Goyo626 on January 19, 2022, 08:41:48 AM ---Is now the time to cut off first bloom?

--- End quote ---

Allow the blooms to fully form and then cut off 1/2 to 2/3 of each panicle. If your tree is young or has weak branches, you can trim the blooms earlier in order to avoid the weight of the blooms to cause the branches to droop. This type of bloom trimming is only for young or non established trees that you donít want to fruit.

When young mango trees in colder climates blooms, the weight of the panicles causes the branches to droop to a horizontal position which exposes the cambium to the sun which in turn can lead to sunburn. If your branches are already hardened in a horizontal position, you can paint the exposed surfaces with a 50:50 mixture of white paint and water. Youíll have to look up what type of paint as I canít remember.

Simon

--- End quote ---

Thanks for the response. I was thinking about getting a second bloom. I read it earlier in a thread that cutting off first bloom at the right time would cause a second bloom to occur. And second bloom is less prone to powdery mildew. Just curious as to when is the right time to do it.

simon_grow:
It really depends on the weather patterns and itís the average low temps that determine if a push is vegetative, blooms or partial blooms. If you remove the blooms too early, like now, you may need a third bloom to avoid the fungal issues.

I would let your blooms develop almost completely and then thin out half the volume of the blooms and then let any fruit set. Around Early March, if you have no or poor fruit set, remove all the blooms in hopes of a secondary bloom.

Simon

Goyo626:
Thanks ill give it a shot for at least some of the trees.

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