Author Topic: Does anyone know a farmers markets or someone in the US that sell fresh macambo  (Read 846 times)

TropicalPioneers

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Like a farmers market in Florida that sell mocambo

Tropical Sunshine

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Mocambo aka the jaguar chocolate fruit (Theobroma bicolor) and its seeds are still rarely offered on the web. Wish more people would grow it and offer the fresh seeds. Currently a typical mocambo seed could easily fetch as much as 5 times (or more) the price of a “common” cacao seed.

Anyone from Hawaii or Puerto Rico willing to help the folks in the contiguous 48 states get access to the fruits/seeds of the marvelous mocambo?!? :-D

« Last Edit: October 25, 2022, 08:24:02 AM by Tropical Sunshine »
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TropicalPioneers

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Thank you and does anyone know in buy fresh  cupuacu pods

palologrower

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Mocambo aka the jaguar chocolate fruit (Theobroma bicolor) and its seeds are still rarely offered on the web. Wish more people would grow it and offer the fresh seeds. Currently a typical mocambo seed could easily fetch as much as 5 times (or more) the price of a “common” cacao seed.

Anyone from Hawaii or Puerto Rico willing to help the folks in the contiguous 48 states get access to the fruits/seeds of the marvelous mocambo?!? :-D

Is it really five time per cacao seed?  Maybe on etsy that would be the case?! ha ha ha.  If I get, the seed I'll usually sell around a buck a piece.  Fruit can't be shipped to mainland (idk about Puerto Rico...different rules compared to Hawaii re: shipping to mainland). 

Cupuassu, we have them here, but not super common. I can only think of 5-6 guys that have it fruiting. But i'm sure there are more growing here and there in the islands.

CeeJey

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Is it really five time per cacao seed?  Maybe on etsy that would be the case?! ha ha ha.  If I get, the seed I'll usually sell around a buck a piece.  Fruit can't be shipped to mainland (idk about Puerto Rico...different rules compared to Hawaii re: shipping to mainland). 

Cupuassu, we have them here, but not super common. I can only think of 5-6 guys that have it fruiting. But i'm sure there are more growing here and there in the islands.

Yeah, etsy's rampant seedflation has been a thing recently, but also viable macambo seems to be legit rare in the states compared to a lot of other stuff.

Tropical Sunshine

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Is it really five time per cacao seed?  Maybe on etsy that would be the case?! ha ha ha.  If I get, the seed I'll usually sell around a buck a piece.  Fruit can't be shipped to mainland (idk about Puerto Rico...different rules compared to Hawaii re: shipping to mainland). 

Cupuassu, we have them here, but not super common. I can only think of 5-6 guys that have it fruiting. But i'm sure there are more growing here and there in the islands.

Yeah, just recently some one (user name withheld for privacy reason) on the web is selling them at $10 a seed! What’s more, I find the seeds to be finicky with germination—Too little water increases the seeds drying out and too much water could lead to rotting of the seeds.

I would love to try at germinating them again, but at the current asking price per seed and difficulty with germination, it’s a high price to pay to get a mocambo plant in my collection, IMHO.

And please do let us in on the good news when you have some seeds available for a buck each, now that’s what I called a great value!
« Last Edit: October 27, 2022, 08:32:23 AM by Tropical Sunshine »
Teach a man to fish, and he will be able to catch fish for life.

Teach a man to nurture plants, and he will be able to eat durian, soursop, mangosteen, papaya, rambutan, and guava fruits for life!

Jaboticaba45

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Miami fruit has cupuacu fruit for sale...
who wants to pay $87 for 1?
 ;D

TropicalPioneers

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Yeah that is a lot of money and from my experience from the mocambo seeds I did get is that they germinate fairly easily just some coconut coir does the trick and they seem to like until I have to transplant them

Rex Begonias

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At those seed prices tho, buying the fruit is for sure a better option, even at those boutique prices from Miami Fruit compared to shelling out $100 for 10 seeds and not getting to try the fruit, plus I’m sure the fruit has good bit more than 10 seeds.  I guess I would just want to be sure nothing was done to it that would make the seeds unviable. 

ben mango

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Miami fruit has cupuacu fruit for sale...
who wants to pay $87 for 1?
 ;D

I think like cacao, the seeds are where the real value is. The fruit tastes like unsweetened yogurt / bland durian. I would only eat it if there was nothing else to eat

Vegan Potato Man

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Miami fruit has cupuacu fruit for sale...
who wants to pay $87 for 1?
 ;D

I think like cacao, the seeds are where the real value is. The fruit tastes like unsweetened yogurt / bland durian. I would only eat it if there was nothing else to eat

Really? I thought cupuacu pulp was super popular as a drink in south america?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FcrUXoACfM


roblack

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Mocambo (t. bicolor) and cupuaco (t. grandiflorum) are different, but both reportedly can have better tasting pulp than cacao. Cacao pulp is amazing to me. I love it. Better than chocolate, which I also dig.

Yet to try cupuacu or mocambo (growing), but as they are reported to taste better than cacao pulp, also wondering how these fruits (grown and picked right), could be considered "bland."

Not chopping anything yet
« Last Edit: October 28, 2022, 05:01:37 PM by roblack »

ben mango

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Sorry I meant t. bicolor / mocambo I wasn’t impressed with

palologrower

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Sorry I meant t. bicolor / mocambo I wasn’t impressed with

will have to say that the mocambo chocolate is where it's ate.  Definitely agree on the flesh. bleh.  roasted seeds are good too.

TropicalPioneers

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Anyone know what fertilizers mocambo prefers most for growing?

TropicalPioneers

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Hello I have bought the cupuacu and the seeds are actually germinating and plan to sell cupuacu seedlings if they make it for 25 dollars plus shipping

Tropical Sunshine

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Just wondering, but about how tall will they be before they get sold at $25 each plus shipping?
Teach a man to fish, and he will be able to catch fish for life.

Teach a man to nurture plants, and he will be able to eat durian, soursop, mangosteen, papaya, rambutan, and guava fruits for life!

TropicalPioneers

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I do agree with that

Tropical Sunshine

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Yeah I'm going to consider using coco coir that has the consistency of a wrung out sponge (just a few drops of water are released when you squeeze the coco coir). I think the compost that I tried to germinate the previous batch of mocambo in was a little on the wetter side, and plus the compost is not sterile either. I learn that when dealing with seeds that are prone to rot, you need to make sure the seed germinating medium is at the appropriate moisture level and not too wet. Thanks for the tip!
Teach a man to fish, and he will be able to catch fish for life.

Teach a man to nurture plants, and he will be able to eat durian, soursop, mangosteen, papaya, rambutan, and guava fruits for life!

TropicalPioneers

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Anyone know where get some Theobroma gileri like pods or seeds?

 

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