Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - countryboy1981

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 8
1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Navel vs Hamlin zone 8B?
« on: December 08, 2021, 01:30:46 PM »
Banking with soil? I’m assuming you are referring to mounding soil up above the graft? My idea was getting a tomato cage to wrap around the trunks and place hay between the cage and tree followed by a wrapping of burlap

That is correct.  Navel oranges are much more cold hardy than they are given credit for after they get some size to them.  My 5+ year old Washington navel takes low 20s without damage even to the leaves.  It is not a great fruit setter though, the Glen Navel sets much more fruit.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Navel vs Hamlin zone 8B?
« on: December 05, 2021, 09:00:00 PM »
No protection other than banking with soil when temps possibly plunge down below 20.

3
I cannot comment as to the hardiness of the artic frost compared to a satsuma as I plantee mine the spring of 2020, but it is more of a cutie sized satsuma.  The peel has a different fragrance but the fruit tastes great.

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Navel vs Hamlin zone 8B?
« on: December 04, 2021, 04:48:48 PM »
My Washington & Glen navel orange trees survived low 20's without any damage.

5
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Arctic Frost Report
« on: November 20, 2021, 10:56:42 PM »
I am at a loss as to why this variety gets a bad rap.  I just ate one today and other than the scent similar to the peel of a changsha mandarin when peeling this variety, it is very good and is of no less quality than my satsumas.  It is more aimilar to the size of cuties than satsumas but they taste very good.  But to note again, my tree is not on its own roots, it is grafted on a trifoliate hybrid.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cold Hardiness of Owari Satsuma???
« on: November 09, 2021, 09:09:51 AM »
I would plant it in the ground amd build a stricture around it during the winter where you can protect it.  It is going to have more cold tolerance in the ground than in the pot if you are keeping the pot outside.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cold Hardiness of Owari Satsuma???
« on: November 07, 2021, 10:16:35 PM »
Your difficulty is not going to be your overall low of 15 degrees but the high the next day and the duration of the cold spells.  My trees have sustained 16 degrees, they were young  (2 to 3 years) and had some significant damage, but we got to 35/36 the next day before plunging back into freezing temps again.  The cold spell was also only 3 days straight.  Satsumas are not very large trees, you could easily build a protective shelter for one if not more than one.

8
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Arctic Frost Report
« on: November 06, 2021, 09:47:23 PM »
Sounds to me like I should try rooting a water shoot from this next year, then…perhaps air graft for roots and then try that as it’s own plant?

You can bank the soil up the tree above the graft line to protect your tree.  It saved a few of my less hardy trees in 2017 when it got down to 16 here.  Here is an illustration:



The soil insulates what is below it and it will regrow from that point.  Just do not leave the soil on it too long.  A trick I have used is a nursrry pot.  Take a plastic nursery pot that is as tall as you would like to bank, cut the bottom out, cut it so you can place it around the tree, then staple it shut, and then fill it with soil to the top.

9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Is this HLB?
« on: November 05, 2021, 09:18:27 PM »
If I were in your location I would preventatively use oak leaf tea on your tree:

https://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/lakeco/2021/01/21/oak-leaf-compost-for-hlb/

10
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Arctic Frost Report
« on: October 27, 2021, 08:10:21 AM »
I wonder what benefit there would be to having Arctic Frost on a rootstock?

Disease resistance and potentially more cold hardiness if they had used pure trifoliate but they did not.

11
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Arctic Frost Report
« on: October 26, 2021, 03:44:06 PM »
My recollection is that the trees are on their own roots. This allows re-sprouting after a freeze. Top killed trees remain true-to-type upon regrowth.

I purchased mine locally and it was grafted by Saxon Becnel & Sons, most likely on a trifoliate hybrid rootstock similar to carrizo citrange (they used to use this exclusively but may have switched in the past few years)

12
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Arctic Frost Report
« on: October 24, 2021, 10:09:15 PM »
I just tasted my first arctic frost today.  I bought the tree last year.  It is a cross between changsha and a satsuma.  Mine is closer to the size of a changsha and with a seed count of in between the two.  Mine tasted similar to a satsuma, I was not disappointed in the flavor at all.  But, I also do think the changsha mandarin I have tastes fine as well but think of it as more a of juicing mandarin due to its seed count.  Do you know what rootstock your tree is on?  My regular satsumas survived more than one night with lows of 16 and making it just above freezing the next day but I am on the south side of the state.

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 17, 2021, 11:32:44 AM »
One charicteristic that is fairly distinctive to limequats is a green cotylidon (the color of the seed when you cut it in half). Most sour citrus (including key limes) have cream colored cotylidons, but Eustis limequat inherited the green color from the kumquat parent. If the seeds are green inside, I'll wager its a limequat regardless of fruit size. However, if the seed is cream colored on the inside, you may have been eating the Volk rootstock fruits.

The leaves match my lakeland limequat above the rootstock and I have had to remove volkamer lemon sprouts which are substantially larger and different looking leaves.  I am not talking about the size of an average satsuma, I am talking about one between the size of a baseball and a golf ball.

14
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 16, 2021, 09:56:33 PM »
I am talking about a very small satsuma, not a large one.  My kukusu kumquats get glof ball size on the lemon rootstock.  I bought that one again without knowing it was volkamer.

15
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 12, 2021, 10:49:55 PM »
If your Eustis gets to the size of satsumas, you don't have Eustis. Eustis only gets to the size of key lime or a little larger. Mine is on flying dragon, about 15 years old & the peel is thin.

It is the result of being on the volkamer lemon rootstock.  The rootstock results in larger, less flavorful fruit, with a thicker peel.  The largest are about the size of a small satsuma.  Most do not get that big but some do.

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 11, 2021, 02:27:22 PM »
Countryboy, I am not surprised that your trees on Volkamer did not survive the cold spell.   Trees on Volk generally have poor freeze tolerance.  Fruit also have poor freeze tolerances  Also the fruit of most scions on Volk is only fair. .

Yea that has been my experience.  I have a lakeland limequat in its own roots and a eustis limequat on volkamer.  The fruit on the lakeland have a thin peel, are about half the size or less, and taste way better than store bought key limes.  The eustis has a thick peel, get to about the size of a satsuma, and are not very flavorful at all.  The eustis has also had some considerable damage a couple of winters.  Even freeze tolerance was not an issue, I would not recommend a volkamer lemon rootstock.  I did not know it was volkamer lemon when I purchased the tree.

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 11, 2021, 10:31:27 AM »
Thanks for the find!

18
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 11, 2021, 12:29:19 AM »
Most of my satsumas (and a Washington Navel) are on carrizo and I have not had any issues with them since the 2017/2018 hard freeze (16 degrees for the low for a few nights and highs not much above freezing) but they were only a few years old or less at the time.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 11, 2021, 12:22:10 AM »
Thanks Millet.  I have mostly clay with some sand mixed.  I have at least one tree (centennial kumquat) on swingle out of 50 or so citrus trees, but have never had one on 897.  I purchased two sugarbelles last year from a local home depot that were on volkamer (the rootstock was not labeled and would not have purchased had I known) and both died back to the rootstock this spring after we had warm weather and a cold snap shortly thereafter.  The other sugarbelle I had on rubidoux was unfazed.  I want to purchase two more sugarbelles to replace but am left with those two options.  I am just wondering if the 897 has a little more cold tolerance than the swingle or not.  Swingle should be fine but I want the advantage of any cold tolerance I can get.

20
Citrus General Discussion / Which rootstock has more cold hardiness?
« on: September 10, 2021, 04:17:44 PM »
I have two potential options for rootstock, US-897 or swingle.  Is either more cold tolerant than the other?

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Madison Citrus Nursery.
« on: July 21, 2021, 08:43:36 AM »
What rootstock is primarily used?

22
Justfruitsandexotics.com has them listed on their site but rarely has them available.  Onegreenworld.com may have what you are looking for.

23
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: THAI DWARF MULBERRY PLANTS
« on: February 28, 2021, 09:32:59 AM »
For anyone with questions as to the hardiness of this tree, it was starting to fully leaf out and then we had a low of 20.  I banked soil around the base of it.  The area that was covered in dirt still has green leaves but the leaves above were toast.  It does not appear that the limbs aboved the banked soil line are dead as pf yet but will not know for sure for another couple of weeks.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Thoughts on this citrus
« on: February 12, 2021, 10:17:52 PM »
UCR also has something about Milam being related to volckameriana.  Is that the same as Volkamer Lemon?:

Quote
This species exhibits a remarkable range of variation in fruit characters, and in India, where it is native, four relatively distinct types are recognized, one of which is similar to the form obtained from Italy known as C. volckameriana (for description see Chapot, 1965a).  There is also a sweet-fleshed form.

https://citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/milam.html

Volkameriana is Volkamer lemon. Millam and Volkamer are listed as different varieties in the citrus rootstock ID book that I have access to, but the UCR link you posted says that they have the same parentage (sour orange x citron). The leaves and other tree charicteristics look very similar in the photos that I looked at. Actually, the leaves are virtually identical in shape. One does tend to be slightly larger than the other, but I doubt that you could tell the difference in the field based on that. The most obvious difference that I could find was the seed count. However, since we are almost certainly talking about a seed grown tree, there is always the chance that it does not fit one mold or the other perfectly. Here is the link for the ID book I have at work. I was surprised to see that it was available for free on-line.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://crec.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/citrus_rootstock/Rootstock-Literature/Rootstocks%2520for%2520Florida%2520Citrus.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjHhYzJ7OXuAhVLVTABHdTgDKkQFjAKegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1KDoXw5vD2dgMO46YjtwLu

Thanks for the info!

25
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Thoughts on this citrus
« on: February 12, 2021, 08:48:10 PM »
UCR also has something about Milam being related to volckameriana.  Is that the same as Volkamer Lemon?:

Quote
This species exhibits a remarkable range of variation in fruit characters, and in India, where it is native, four relatively distinct types are recognized, one of which is similar to the form obtained from Italy known as C. volckameriana (for description see Chapot, 1965a).  There is also a sweet-fleshed form.

https://citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/milam.html

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 8
SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk