Author Topic: citradia and taiwanica, who can tell me the self expirienced winterhardiness in  (Read 315 times)

tedburn

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I got this year a citradia and taiwanica and plan to plant them next spring in ground in zone 7, everyone out there who  cultivates them in ground and can tell me of his experience how frosthardy they are, which lowest temperature have they born good, which temperature survived with small damages?
Thanks for your help  ;)

Citradia

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I have grown and lost several citradia and tiawanica seedlings over the years. Both have died down to ground and came back from roots several times when temps got down below 5 degrees F or when they started to grow in mid March and got a freeze of 14 degrees F. My tiawanica finally totally died one year, but I still have one citradia that is multi trunked and about five feet tall. I’m grafting it and growing cuttings of it to perpetuate the variety since it is extremely rare in the USA at this time. I’ve never got fruit from any of my citranges or hybrids since they freeze down to immature wood at least every other year if not every year if left uncovered. This past winter was very mild and my citradia and a dunstan and an 80-5, and one ichangensis seeeling were unscathed but my unprotected Thomasville lost half of its height again. My tiawanica was not any hardier than Ichang lemon even inside an unheated hoop house/high tunnel. Tiawanica really can’t handle five degrees F without suplimental heating and covering, as is the case for any true citrus variety without poncirus parentage.

tedburn

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thanks citradia for your very interesting information and experience. So I will also have to protect them when planting in ground.
Best regards Frank

SoCal2warm

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From talking with Nat Bradford, I know Taiwanica can easily survive the border of zone 8a/7b in the US South, and if it does suffer damage it will easily recover, but I'm not sure how it will do in the same zone classification further north in a cooler climate.
You should at least plant it in an optimal spot, not completely out in the open.

I have difficulty imagining it will like zone 7 Germany.
Could probably grow in zone 8a part of Germany, but not 7.

I doubt it's hardier than Yuzu, probably similar.

As for the Citradia, I'd imagine it would have no problem in 7b but not sure about 7a. Might suffer some damage most years but could then recover, due to its sour orange parentage which is pretty vigorous growing.

Disclaimer: I do not grow these two varieties, but have lots of experience growing many others, all different kinds, rare Japanese varieties and strange hybrids, so I think I do have some intuition on this.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2021, 01:32:02 PM by SoCal2warm »

tedburn

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SoCal,
my Yuzu froze down a few cm about earth (-16 degree celsius) this winter but no comes back.
And due to my experiences with this winter and small plants in ground, I still will keep them 1 or 2 winters in pot
before planting in ground.

Citradia

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Here’s a current pic of my citradia under pvc pipe frame ready to be covered if temps predicted to get too low. This tree is around 10 years old. Froze back many times and once to roots and was given up for dead. Came back.

 

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