Author Topic: Passiflora incarnata  (Read 1379 times)

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2021, 12:07:18 PM »
If you check back over my YouTube videos I think I did a maypop one last year, and you can see the white one.
Itís a known phenotype, not unique to me :)

If the seed is mature and fully formed (black with dimpled surface) then it should be viable and would cross pollinate, in my view.

Plantinyum

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2021, 02:47:40 PM »
If you check back over my YouTube videos I think I did a maypop one last year, and you can see the white one.
Itís a known phenotype, not unique to me :)

If the seed is mature and fully formed (black with dimpled surface) then it should be viable and would cross pollinate, in my view.
i checked your garden tour video, very nice plants ! Sadly the white one did not had an opened flower but my imagination filled the dead spot.
I haven't seen figs with such long necks to them...
Your pawpaws look awesome, did you paint the trunks and all with latecs paint?? Even the same years growth and u get the buds covered in paint and do not have problems ?

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2021, 08:28:56 AM »
If you go back to 2020 or even 2019 I think I have a video just on incarnata (maypop) just FYI

thanks for the kind words!
Yes I paint the trunks with latex paint and (many of the branches) in late autumn or early winter.
I try to keep the paint off the buds but so far I havenít seen any problems.
I will probably not continue painting branches since the trees are so big now. Normally people only paint the trunks, but Iím a little eccentric 😁

Plantinyum

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #28 on: September 04, 2021, 11:24:18 AM »
If you go back to 2020 or even 2019 I think I have a video just on incarnata (maypop) just FYI

thanks for the kind words!
Yes I paint the trunks with latex paint and (many of the branches) in late autumn or early winter.
I try to keep the paint off the buds but so far I havenít seen any problems.
I will probably not continue painting branches since the trees are so big now. Normally people only paint the trunks, but Iím a little eccentric 😁
i may try the paint on my asimina, u paint them so the trunk does not get a sun injury in winter right ??

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2021, 10:05:31 AM »
Yep! They are very susceptible to winter sun injury.

Plantinyum

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #30 on: September 05, 2021, 03:00:54 PM »
Yep! They are very susceptible to winter sun injury.
thanks, i had some dieback on one of my plants last winter, thought it was on the new branches, not on the thick parts....it may not have been the sun only, since the  plant was newly planted arround fall ...

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #31 on: September 06, 2021, 09:23:59 AM »
Yes I would expect sun injury to take at least a couple seasons to manifest. It doesnít kill them quickly.

Plantinyum

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #32 on: September 06, 2021, 03:13:04 PM »
Yes I would expect sun injury to take at least a couple seasons to manifest. It doesnít kill them quickly.
nice thanks for all the information, i will paint them then, after leaf drop...

vnomonee

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2021, 04:31:58 PM »
Biggest one I've ever had 80g. Smells sweet but will leave it for a few days




Some pawpaws and another maypop fruit for comparison (my pawpaw trees make small fruit)


« Last Edit: September 15, 2021, 04:34:50 PM by vnomonee »

Plantinyum

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2021, 01:12:44 AM »
Biggest one I've ever had 80g. Smells sweet but will leave it for a few days





Some pawpaws and another maypop fruit for comparison (my pawpaw trees make small fruit)


They both look delicious !
My plant has managed to set one fruit which is at a big pea size now. I assume it'll stop growing now since the weather has cooled alot here. I will leave it foe as long as i can, then i will disect it and see if there are any seed formations inside or it ends up being a empty bubble.

nullroar

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #35 on: September 17, 2021, 05:16:00 PM »
Regarding the original Q, i've always assumed incarnata to be self-pollinating, but to be honest, the gulf fritillary caterpillar, which seems to be able to pick out a single maypop plant from 100 miles away, is so darned efficient at locating (and eating) these things, that it wouldn't surprise me if the corresponding butterfly could pollinate pretty much any outdoor incarnata flower, regardless of how far away it was from its closest companion. It's utterly insane how fast these things find passionflowers.

Plantinyum

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2021, 02:40:59 PM »
Regarding the original Q, i've always assumed incarnata to be self-pollinating, but to be honest, the gulf fritillary caterpillar, which seems to be able to pick out a single maypop plant from 100 miles away, is so darned efficient at locating (and eating) these things, that it wouldn't surprise me if the corresponding butterfly could pollinate pretty much any outdoor incarnata flower, regardless of how far away it was from its closest companion. It's utterly insane how fast these things find passionflowers.
ha ive never/first summer i own the plant,  had any kind of butterfly visit it, as long as i'm aware. Never had any caterpillars  or damage from bugs eating the leaves and such. But do theese buterflies pollinate the flowers? Ive never read anywhere about any kind of passiflora that gets pollinated by butterflies. I thought they use it as a host plant thats ment to be eaten by them.... my yard is basically covered with one huge hail net so its generally hard for insects to visit my plants....

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #37 on: September 18, 2021, 04:22:39 PM »
No, they do not pollinate the flowers. They just lay eggs on the leaves and the larvae eat them voraciously.
Here in the US m, carpenter/bumblebees pollinate them. (Not honey bees)

paruck

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Re: Passiflora incarnata
« Reply #38 on: September 20, 2021, 09:15:55 PM »
artificial pollination needs to be done at a specific time, from noon onwards the flowers are ready to receive the pollen

 

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