Author Topic: Salaks  (Read 1234 times)

PitangatubaMoray

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Salaks
« on: December 04, 2020, 02:19:30 PM »
Are salaks good potted plants/House plants?
« Last Edit: December 04, 2020, 02:21:31 PM by PitangatubaMoray »

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2020, 02:27:05 PM »
X
« Last Edit: December 22, 2020, 10:07:04 AM by Jaboticaba45 »
Ryan is my name; growing artocarpus is my game-but I also grow a lot of other stuff

PitangatubaMoray

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2020, 02:41:23 PM »
Salaks could be grown in containers, just needs a climate controlled greenhouse with high humidity and temps never below 60...its ultra tropical, thorny, and slow growing. Sorry to discourage you, but growing them in a temperate climate isn't gonna happen.

Eeh, it was worth a shot

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2020, 02:57:54 PM »
X
« Last Edit: December 22, 2020, 10:06:56 AM by Jaboticaba45 »
Ryan is my name; growing artocarpus is my game-but I also grow a lot of other stuff

Mike T

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2020, 03:36:54 PM »
I would try the Bali types as they are more gracile and smaller and monos as well.

brian

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2020, 05:06:07 PM »
How big do they need to get to produce fruit?

Need male and female plants, too, right?

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2020, 08:02:47 PM »
X
« Last Edit: December 22, 2020, 10:06:46 AM by Jaboticaba45 »
Ryan is my name; growing artocarpus is my game-but I also grow a lot of other stuff

Andreas Gia

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2020, 09:36:38 PM »
Ryan,

No disrespect, but I have three salaks that grow outside in 9a. They have taken at least 2 freezes. Don’t really need a greenhouse in my experience. Had 5 plants 2 years later 3 are still alive. Other two died from not being watered. All were/still grown/growing in containers

JoeP450

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2020, 09:48:43 PM »
Agree this is false, I have 7-8 salaks growing outside in martin county Fl, ast year low was around 38 I think, they were fine. I feel people are overly cautious on soursop too which will definitely loose its leaves but my sour sop seedlings didn’t die either.

Joe

Mike T

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2020, 12:16:51 AM »
Balis are self pollinating bisex of var. amboina and much smaller than other S.zalacca forms. Sub varieties from the highland such as gula pasir will be more cold tolerant. No others in the genus are monos. All wallichiana types are too big for pots anyway and the rest of the genus has lower quality fruit or are way too robust for pots. Balis can fruit at a small size when just a few years old especially if grown from suckers.

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2020, 09:55:01 AM »
X
« Last Edit: December 22, 2020, 10:06:37 AM by Jaboticaba45 »
Ryan is my name; growing artocarpus is my game-but I also grow a lot of other stuff

brian

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2020, 02:37:19 PM »
Balis are self pollinating bisex of var. amboina and much smaller than other S.zalacca forms. Sub varieties from the highland such as gula pasir will be more cold tolerant. No others in the genus are monos. All wallichiana types are too big for pots anyway and the rest of the genus has lower quality fruit or are way too robust for pots. Balis can fruit at a small size when just a few years old especially if grown from suckers.

Thanks Mike

JoeP450

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2020, 10:02:27 PM »
From my readings the gist has been keep shaded when young, moist or wet mostly, and watch out for temps below 50. What I have done though is not entirely that, I have planted them in shaded areas as understory plants  though I haven’t went out of my way to water them or protect them from cold weather.... I suspect they are hardy like any other palm in Fl in regards to temp and water but I’m going to find out one way or the other as time goes on.

I bought my seeds from Han sen here as “honey salak” http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=32884.msg360032#msg360032 anyone know if this this is the Bali type and monoecious?

Thanks

Joe

Mike T

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2020, 10:24:01 PM »
Of 20 species of Salaks really 3 maybe 4 species are alright to eat with Salacca zalacca and S. wallichiana being the best 2. S.zalacca not bali separate sex ones like yougyarta and honey are big and very pickly but not as big as S.wallichiana and spines are not quite as angry. Balis are more gracile and have btter pineapple core like fruit with some variation. There are 20 to 25 bali types and about the same with standard S.zalaccas from indo and malysia. S.wallichiana is a spectrum ranging from poorer wild-like types sakum and rakum to proper sala, highest form of this species so far as fruit quality goes. Noen wong and sumalee are the best and fruit produce more females. All salaks are swampy area palms enjoying filtered light and can handle full sun when adult.

Andreas Gia

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2020, 10:26:52 PM »
If anyone can decipher this as to what I actually am growing that would be appreciated. They are from Thailand. Not much to go on.
Joe to your point. These seeds actually survived a frost when they were planted, they had just breached the surface. I would suspect that they are like most other palms like you’ve said.

The image section isn’t working but this is the item that was bought from Thailand.
“5 seeds salacca zalacca salak rare/ very hard to find Thailand”
« Last Edit: December 05, 2020, 10:33:50 PM by Andreas Gia »

Mike T

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2020, 10:32:54 PM »
Ok Thailand then it is Salacca wallichiana.. Was it like snake skin with a point yellow flesh like pineapple with a hint of cough medicine? Purchased in bangkok markets? The story of salaks is long and multi-faceted and when you try to say something concisely it can be hard to understand. The more precise the question then the easier it is to answer.

Andreas Gia

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2020, 10:35:19 PM »
Mike, can you tell the difference by looking at the plant? Never had the fruit. Just bought that seeds.

Mike T

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2020, 10:46:18 PM »
Much of the time yes. I will wind back with salaks generally and say they are a genus of a few over 20 swampy palms related to calamus in SE Asia with edible fruit. In Java to Malaysia a bit Sallaca zallaca subs zalacca was improved into good varieties with separate sexes still. The closely related Bali salak of bali and amboina S.salacca subs amboina is a much smaller plant and is bisex and also has a number of varieties. By contrast the Thailand S. wallichiana is a big prickly plant with separate sexes and in the markets you can all the stages of its improvement reflected in the fruit quality. Sala is the Thai name for the best types.
The question is where did the seeds come from? What did the fruit look like? Then all will be revealed.

Andreas Gia

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2020, 11:36:24 PM »




Mike, do these pictures work for you or would you still need the fruit?

JoeP450

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2020, 11:43:15 PM »

 Any guesses here?

Joe

Mike T

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2020, 01:12:04 AM »
What I know as Honey variety of S. zalacca zalacca is more spherical than that but fruit vary. If I was forced to guess I would say pondoh but it could be honey. Some balis have fruit that look very similar.  That young plant looks too robust for bali but too young to distinguish between zalacca and wallichiana for me. Is the source of the seed an information vacuum?

Andreas Gia

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #21 on: December 06, 2020, 01:38:55 AM »
As you would expect little to nothing to go on. Not even pictures of the fruit were listed. Just titled S. Zalacca seeds

Mike T

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2020, 01:51:32 AM »
Ok most likely Salacca zalacca variety pondoh

Plantinyum

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2020, 05:51:38 AM »
I have tried two times to grow salak from seeds, dunno the variety. First time the plants sprouted in winter and grew slow, come spring I took them out and for month or more they just sat with theyr first two leaves and did not do anything, it was not summer yet so it was maybe coolish for them to grow . Anyway I just ran out of patience and discarded them, they were fine in any matter.
Second time I sprouted the seeds again in winter ,maybe around january , then took them out with the rest of my tropicals around middle of april, in a unheated nylon greenhouse and for 2/3 nights there was frost . All other plants did well, the salaks started desicating in a few days and died in a week. Temps in the greenhouse got maybe to 0-1 C maybe lower . I knew I should have took them in ...

Capt Ram

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Re: Salaks
« Reply #24 on: January 01, 2021, 05:17:38 AM »
opp deleted
« Last Edit: January 01, 2021, 05:26:08 AM by Capt Ram »
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